138 results in English
Antietam, Maryland. Allan Pinkerton, President Lincoln, and Major General John A. McClernand: Another View
At the outset of the U.S. Civil War, Mathew Brady dispatched a team of photographers to document the conflict. Among them was a Scottish-born immigrant named Alexander Gardner, the photographer who took this photo of Lincoln at Antietam as well as other famous wartime shots. The man to Lincoln's right is Allan Pinkerton, founder of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency, whom Lincoln had as head of a personal security detail during the war. Gardner titled another shot of Pinkerton and his brother William at Antietam “The Secret Service ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Fortress of Brum in Pernambuco
This 19th-century plan, made by a captain in the Brazilian Army’s inspectorate of fortresses, shows the fortress at Brum, which was constructed by the Dutch and the Portuguese in the 17th century.
German Lutheran Church (1861-64), Southwest View, Perm', Russia
This southwest view of the Lutheran Church in Perm' was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Established in the 1720s as a factory settlement on the middle reaches of the Kama River, Perm’ (so named in 1781) is a city of many ethnic groups and faiths. In 1861, the small Lutheran community, primarily of German origin, was given permission to construct a house of worship on St. Catherine Street ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map Showing the Different Routes Surveyed for the Union Pacific Rail Road Between the Missouri River and the Platte Valley
President Abraham Lincoln signed the Pacific Railroad Act into law on July 1, 1862. The act gave two companies, the Union Pacific Railroad and the Central Pacific Railroad, responsibility for completing the transcontinental railroad. The Union Pacific was to lay track westward from a point near Omaha, Nebraska toward Ogden, Utah; the Central Pacific was to build eastward from Sacramento, California. The Union Pacific began construction on December 2, 1863. This map, submitted to Secretary of Interior James Harlan on September 18, 1865, by Lieutenant Colonel J.H. Simpson of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Johnson’s Turkey in Asia, Persia, Arabia, etc.
This map of the Middle East and Central and South Asia extending from the Nile Valley to the boundary of Afghanistan with British India is from Johnson’s New Illustrated Family Atlas, published in New York in 1864. The map shows national capitals, provincial capitals, principal towns, and railroads. The Suez Canal, under construction at this time, is shown as proposed. The map provides a detailed overview of the towns and cities along the Nile in Egypt, Nubia (present-day southern Egypt and northern Sudan), and Sennar (present-day Sudan), and of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Personal Narrative of a Year’s Journey through Central and Eastern Arabia (1862–63)
William Gifford Palgrave (1826–88) was a famous English traveler to Arabia who inspired a generation of European explorers and missionaries. He became fluent in Arabic while serving as a Jesuit missionary in Syria. In 1862 he undertook a year-long journey through the Arabian Peninsula with the stated aim of studying the “moral, political, and intellectual conditions of living Arabia.” He was also working as a secret agent for the French emperor, Napoleon III (1808–73). Palgrave disguised himself as a Syrian doctor and was accompanied by his assistant, Barakāt ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Journey through the Atmosphere on an Airship
Al-riḥla al-jawwīya fī al-markaba al-hawā'iya (A journey through the atmosphere on an airship) is an Arabic translation by Yusuf Ilyan Sarkis (1856−1932 or 1933) of Cinq Semaines en Ballon (Five weeks in a balloon), a novel by the French author Jules Verne originally published in 1863. Shown here is a second edition of this work, produced by the Jesuit print shop in Beirut in 1884 (the first edition having been published in 1875). The novel tells the story of an explorer, Dr. Samuel Ferguson, who, accompanied by a ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
Alphabet of the Five Parts of the World
This abecedarium, published in Paris in 1863, is made up of color lithographs, purportedly illustrating the people of the different countries of the world. Each letter is associated with a country, which is represented by individuals in traditional dress, usually a couple, who are supposed to reflect the place and its population. These representations, somewhat romantic, are more theatrical than anthropologically accurate. Many are very approximate, sometimes even unrealistic or inaccurate. For the letter Q, for example, “Quebec” is represented by a woman in oriental dress, and a minaret and ...
Unidentified African American Soldier in Union Uniform with Wife and Two Daughters
In May 1863, U.S. Secretary of War Edwin Stanton issued General Order Number 143 creating the Bureau of U. S. Colored Troops. This photograph shows an unidentified African American soldier in a Union uniform, with his wife in dress and hat, and two daughters wearing matching coats and hats. The image was found in Cecil County, Maryland, making it likely that this soldier belonged to one of the seven United States Colored Troop regiments raised in Maryland. The photograph is from the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Private Henry Augustus Moore of Company F, 15th Mississippi Infantry Regiment
This photograph shows a Confederate soldier during the American Civil War (1861−65). He is identified as Private Henry Augustus Moore of Company F, 15th Mississippi Infantry Regiment. Moore is wearing a grey coat with short, one-inch wide bars across the chest, a uniform based in part on regulations prescribed by the state of Mississippi. He holds a short artillery sword and a sign that reads “Jeff Davis and the South!” Jefferson Davis was a former senator from Mississippi who was inaugurated president of the Confederate States of America on ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Actors Backstage Sugoroku
Actors Backstage Sugoroku is an e-sugoroku (picture board game) that depicts the backstage area of a Kabuki theater (playhouse). Published in 1863, towards the end of the Edo period, it contains pictures by Utagawa Kunisada II (also seen as Utagawa Toyokuni IV, 1823−80). This is a type of sugoroku called tobi-sugoroku (flying sugoroku), in which the squares are not lined up in order and the player moves around the board by jumping from square to square, depending on the roll of the die. From the furi-hajime (start) at the ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Lectures Notes on Natural Law, International Law, Constitutional Law, Political Economy, and Statistics
In 1853, after the arrival of Commodore Matthew C. Perry (1794–1858), there was an urgent need to introduce Western learning and technology in Japan. The Bakufu (shogunate) therefore devised a plan to acquire Western ships and to send Japanese to study abroad. At first Japan considered the United States as the best country from which to order warships and to send students, but it was unable to do so because of the American Civil War. The Bakufu therefore approached Holland and negotiated and finalized with the Dutch an order ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
A Street Vendor from Bahia
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. In 1862, the government of Spain under Queen Isabella II sent a team of naturalists to South America to collect objects for Spanish museums. The endeavor was known as ...
A Street Vendor from Bahia
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. In 1862, the government of Spain under Queen Isabella II sent a team of naturalists to South America to collect objects for Spanish museums. The endeavor was known as ...
The Battery at a Fort in Bahia
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. The Fort of San Marcelo, also known as the Sea Fort, is located on a slab of land in the Bay of All Saints off the coast of Bahia ...
Commentary on the Mysteries of Revelation, the Perfection of Locution, and Comprehensive Interpretation
Al-Kashshāf (Commentary) is among the most widely known tafsirs (explications or exegeses) of the Qurʼan. Written in 12th-century Persia by Mahmud ibn ʻUmar Zamakhshari, it remains the object of study and debate among exegetes, who argue against its Mu’tazilite rationalism, even as they recognize its deep learning and linguistic sophistication. The work is taught, if not admired, by all the Sunni and Shia schools of interpretation. Modern scholar Kifayat Ullah states that “no other work in the history of tafsir has been commented on in the forms of glosses ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
Assault and Siege of the Fortified City of Chimkent from September 19–25, 1864
This topographic map shows the Russian battle plan for the siege of Chimkent (also seen as Shymkent, in present-day southern Kazakhstan) in September 1864, when Russian forces under General Cherniaev captured the city by defeating the forces of the Kokand khanate. The map is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Recipients of the Cross of Saint George, Awarded with the Highest Military Honor. For the Capture of the City of Turkestan on June 12, 1864: Professional Soldiers Tatarinov, Prokof'ev, and Kashin
This photograph is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The compiler of the first three parts was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Recipients of the Cross of Saint George, Awarded with the Highest Military Honor. For Action near Murza-Rabat on April 5, 1865: Ensign M.G. Bogdanov
This photograph is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The compiler of the first three parts was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Recipients of the Cross of Saint George, Awarded with the Highest Military Honor. For Action near Murza-Rabat on April 5, 1865: Staff Captain Aleksandr E. Efremov
This photograph is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The compiler of the first three parts was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Major General Franz Sigel
The German-American Franz Sigel (1824–1902) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in Sinsheim, Grand Duchy of Baden, he graduated from the Karlsruhe military academy in 1843. Sigel served as colonel and later secretary of war of the Baden revolutionary army during the revolutions of 1848 and 1849. He immigrated to New York City in 1852, where, along with his father-in-law, he founded the German-American Institute. He was favored by President Abraham Lincoln for his ability to garner German-American support for the Union, and in May ...
Blockade and Siege of the Fortified City of Tashkent from May 9 to June 15, 1865
This topographic map shows the battle plan used by Russian forces in the blockade and siege of the ancient city of Tashkent in May-June 1865. The Russians under the command of General Cherniaev captured the city by overcoming the forces of the Kokand khanate commanded by ʻAlimqul, who died in the battle. The map is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Recipients of the Cross of Saint George, Awarded with the Highest Military Honor. For the Capture of Ak-Mechet (Fort Perovskii) on June 22, 1853: Non-Commissioned Officer Sharapov of the Orenburg Cossack Troops
This photograph is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The compiler of the first three parts was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Recipients of the Cross of Saint George, Awarded with the Highest Military Honor. For the Capture of Ak-Mechet (Fort Perovskii) on June 22, 1853: Kirgiz Safarov
This photograph is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The compiler of the first three parts was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Recipients of the Cross of Saint George, Awarded with the Highest Military Honor. For the Capture of Tashkent on June 18, 1865: Non-Commissioned Officer Gladyshev of the Medical Company
This photograph is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The compiler of the first three parts was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Recipients of the Cross of Saint George, Awarded with the Highest Military Honor. For the Capture of Tashkent on June 18, 1865: Professional Soldier Smoliak
This photograph is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The compiler of the first three parts was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Recipients of the Cross of Saint George, Awarded with the Highest Military Honor. For the Capture of Tashkent on June 18, 1865: Non-Commissioned Officer Bukin of the Ural Cossack Troops
This photograph is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The compiler of the first three parts was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Brigadier General Abram Duryée
Abram Duryée (1815–90) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in New York City, he graduated from Columbia University and was a wealthy mahogany importer. He rose rapidly in the New York State Militia to reach the rank of colonel in 1859. Unlike many generals from both the North and the South, he did not see action in the Mexican War. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Duryée recruited a regiment, known as Duryée’s Zouaves, or the Fifth New York, which he led during ...
Recipients of the Cross of Saint George, Awarded with the Highest Military Honor. For the Capture of Tashkent on June 18, 1865: Private Mozgatov of the Chinaz Local Company
This photograph is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The compiler of the first three parts was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Brigadier General Joseph Hooker
Joseph Hooker (1814‒79) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in Hadley, Massachusetts, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point and served in the Mexican War (1846‒48). During the Civil War, he commanded a division in the Peninsular Campaign of 1862 and as a corps commander led the initial Union attacks at the Battle of Antietam. In January 1863 he replaced Ambrose Everett Burnside as commander of the Army of the Potomac, but he was relieved of his command by President ...
Brigadier General Robert Anderson
Robert Anderson (1805–71) was a U.S. Army officer in the American Civil War who gained national fame as the major commanding the Union garrison at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina when the Civil War began. Born near Louisville, Kentucky, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1825. He fought in the Black Hawk (1832) and Second Seminole (1835–42) Wars. Anderson’s fluency in French and study of French artillery tactics enabled him to help develop highly mobile “flying artillery,” also ...
Brigadier General Joseph K. Mansfield
Joseph King Fenno Mansfield (1803–62) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in New Haven, Connecticut, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1822. Mansfield served in the Army Corps of Engineers planning fortifications along the southeast coast, such as Fort Pulaski, Georgia. He served with distinction as chief engineer under Colonel Zachary Taylor in the Mexican War (1846–48), which led to his promotion to inspector general of the army. With the outbreak of the Civil War in April 1861 ...
Captain David Farragut
David Farragut (1801‒70) was a Union naval officer in the American Civil War. He entered the U.S. Navy in 1810, at the age of nine, and fought against the British in the War of 1812 and later against pirates in the Caribbean. During the Civil War, he led the Union forces that captured New Orleans in April 1862, and worked closely with the army of General Ulysses S. Grant in the siege and capture of Vicksburg in July 1863. He was promoted to admiral in 1866 and remained ...
Commodore Theodorus Bailey
Theodorus Bailey (1805–77) was a Union naval officer in the American Civil War. He was born in Chateaugay, New York, and joined the navy as a midshipman at age 13. His early service included two circumnavigations of the globe by the age of 31. Bailey received his first command during the Mexican War (1846‒48). At the outbreak of the Civil War in April 1861, Captain Bailey was assigned a command in the Gulf Blockading Squadron. In April 1862, he was promoted to second-in-command of the West Gulf Coast ...
Commander Charles S. Boggs
Charles Stuart Boggs (1811–88) was a Union naval officer in the American Civil War. Born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, he served as lieutenant aboard the steamer USS Princeton in the Mexican War (1846–48), where he earned a reputation for remaining calm in time of danger. During the Civil War, he was assigned to command the USS Varuna in the fleet of Admiral David Farragut. In April 1862 he took part in the capture of New Orleans, which led to his promotion to captain and reassignment to command ...
Commodore Andrew Hull Foote
Andrew Hull Foote (1806–63) was a Union naval officer in the American Civil War. Born in New Haven, Connecticut, he attended the United States Military Academy at West Point but left in 1822 to serve in the United States Navy. Foote was a dedicated advocate of temperance and was a key figure in the elimination of the naval spirit ration. In February 1862, he led a successful attack on Fort Henry on the Tennessee River and was wounded in an attack several days later on Fort Donelson. Foote was ...
Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Du Pont
Samuel Francis Du Pont (1803–65) was a Union naval officer in the American Civil War. Born in Bergen Point (present-day Bayonne), New Jersey, he was a member of the prominent du Pont family. His paternal grandfather, Pierre Samuel du Pont de Nemours, was a French economist, diplomat, and advisor to Louis XVI. Du Pont started his naval career at the age of 12 as a midshipman on the USS Franklin. He served with distinction in the Mexican War (1846‒48) and was instrumental in taking San Diego. With the ...
Commander Charles Henry Davis
Charles Henry Davis (1807–77) was a scientist and Union naval officer in the American Civil War. Born in Boston, Massachusetts, he attended Harvard for two years and left to serve in the United States Navy. He was the first superintendent of the American Nautical Almanac Office, where he helped establish the American Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac,and a charter member of the National Academy of Sciences. During the Civil War, Davis was appointed commander of the Mississippi Flotilla. On June 6, 1862, he led the Union fleet to victory ...
Flag Officer Silas H. Stringham
Silas Horton Stringham (1798–1876) was a Union naval officer who served in the American Civil War. Born in Middletown, New York, he began his naval career at the age of 12 as a midshipman aboard the frigate President. He saw action in the War of 1812 and the Mexican War (1846‒48). Upon the outbreak of the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln appointed Stringham commander of the Atlantic Blockading Squadron, where, with General Benjamin Butler of the Union Army, he led a successful joint amphibious attack on Fort Clark ...
Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase
Salmon P. Chase (1808‒73) was secretary of the treasury in the administration of President Abraham Lincoln. Born in New Hampshire, as a child he was sent to live with an uncle in Ohio after the death of his father. Chase was a deeply religious man who throughout his life sought to reconcile his personal and political ambitions with his faith and sense of obligation to society. After graduating from Dartmouth College in 1826, he studied law in Washington, DC, but then returned to Ohio where he developed a successful ...
Secretary of the Interior Caleb B. Smith
Caleb B. Smith (1808‒64) was President Abraham Lincoln’s first secretary of the interior. He was born in Boston but at a young age moved with his parents to Cincinnati. After studying law in Ohio, as a young man he left the state for Indiana, where he was admitted to the bar, practiced law, and became active in politics. He was elected to five terms in the Indiana House of Representatives (1833‒42), followed by four terms in the U.S. House of Representatives (1843‒49). A member of ...
Attorney General Edward Bates
Edward Bates (1793‒1869) served as attorney general in the cabinet of President Abraham Lincoln during the early years of the American Civil War. Born in Virginia into a slaveholding family, Bates moved to Maryland, where he enlisted in the militia to fight the British during the War of 1812. At a young age, he moved to the Missouri Territory, where he studied law, developed a successful law practice, and became involved in politics. At age 27 he was elected to the post of attorney general in the new state ...