12 results in English
Trevelyon Miscellany, 1608
Thomas Trevilian, or Trevelyon, a London craftsman of whom little is known, created his miscellany in 1608 when he was about the age of 60. The bulky manuscript of 290 double-sided folios contains texts and images appropriated from books, woodcuts, and engravings of his day. Part one of the manuscript (leaves 3–36) consists of historical and practical information: a time line; an illustrated calendar; moralizing proverbs; a series of computational tables and astronomical diagrams; lists of families linked to William the Conqueror; distances between London and cities around the ...
The Insurrection in Dublin
The Easter Rising of April 1916 was an attempt by Irish nationalists to provoke a nationwide rebellion and thereby secure Ireland’s independence from British rule. In fighting that was largely confined to Dublin, 60 insurgents and 130 troops and police were killed, along with 300 civilians caught in the crossfire. In the aftermath of the uprising the British executed another 15 conspirators, including Sir Roger Casement, a Protestant who had become an ardent Irish nationalist and who had sought to acquire weapons for the insurgents from Germany, Britain’s ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The "Graphic" Statistical Maps of Ireland
This set of six statistical maps provides an economic and demographic overview of Ireland in the first half of the 1880s. Color coding is used to show population density, education, religion, agricultural production, wealth (measured by the value of taxed property), and poverty for each of the 32 counties. Small tables in the lower right of each map provide the same data in numerical form for the four provinces into which the counties of Ireland are grouped. Among the notable facts that can be gleaned from the map is the ...
The British Isles
This 1842 map of the British Isles was published “under the superintendence” of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, an organization founded in London in 1826 for the purpose of improving the educational level of the British working and middle classes. The map was engraved by J. & C. Walker, a London firm of engravers, draftsmen, and publishers that flourished in the mid-19th century. It was published by Chapman and Hall, a London bookselling and publishing business established in 1830 by William Hall (1800–1847) and Edward Chapman (1804 ...
The Kingdom of Ireland, Divided as Much into the Main Regions of Ulster, Connacht, Leinster and Munster
This hand-colored map of Ireland was published in 1715 by the firm of Nuremberg engraver and publisher Johann Baptist Homann (1663–1724). It is based on earlier works by Nicolaes Visscher (1649-1702), of the second of three generations of Visschers who were art dealers and map publishers in Amsterdam, and Sir William Petty (1623–87), the pioneering English political economist who directed the nationwide cadastral survey of Ireland carried out under Oliver Cromwell in 1656–58. The map is in Latin, but place-names are in English and the original Celtic ...
The Province of Ulster Surveyed by Sir William Petty
This map of Ulster (present-day Northern Ireland), published in London in 1689, is based on the Down Survey of Ireland undertaken in 1656–58. As indicated in the subtitle, the map shows the counties and baronies of the province, archbishoprics, cities, roads and bridges, and the distribution of seats in parliament. Relief is shown pictorially. The map has two distance scales, Irish miles and English miles. The Down Survey was the first detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world. Its purpose was to measure lands which ...
History of the Sinn Fein Movement and the Irish Rebellion of 1916
Sinn Fein (Gaelic for “We Ourselves”) was founded to promote the cultural revival and political independence of Ireland. History of the Sinn Fein Movement and the Irish Rebellion of 1916 is a detailed history of the movement, written by Francis P. Jones, a former member of the movement who had immigrated to the United States from Ireland. The book covers the period from the founding of Sinn Fein in Dublin in 1905 to the Easter Rising of April 1916. It deals with the economic, cultural, religious, and political aspects of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Doing My Bit for Ireland
Margaret Skinnider (circa 1893‒1971) was born in Scotland to Irish parents. She trained as a teacher and taught mathematics in Glasgow, Scotland, before resigning her position to go to Dublin to take part in the Easter Rising of April 1916. Skinnider’s Doing My Bit for Ireland, published in the United States in 1917, is her account of her revolutionary activities in 1915 and 1916. She begins by telling the story of her first trip to Dublin, in 1915, when she smuggled detonators for bombs into Ireland for use ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
World Chronicle with the Descent of the Kings of England from Adam and Eve to Richard III
This manuscript, produced in London around 1500, traces the genealogy of the kings of England from Adam and Eve to Richard III. The manuscript was made in the manner of William Caxton (circa 1422–92), the first English printer. Written in English, on vellum, the volume still has its original brown calf binding. Illustrations are mostly large compositions in pen and ink and include images of the Last Judgment and the fall of the rebel angels, the Creation, the fall of Adam and Eve, and Noah’s ark. Also included ...
Contributed by Irish College in Paris
Royal Farewell to the Imperial Yeomanry: the Prince of Wales Shaking Hands with the Officers
This wash drawing on paper, mounted on board, is by Henry Marriott Paget (1856-1936), who created it for the British illustrated weekly newspaper, the Graphic, where it appeared on February 3, 1900. The drawing shows Albert Edward, the Prince of Wales (the future King Edward VII), saying farewell to the soldiers of the Imperial Yeomanry, a volunteer cavalry regiment established to fight in the Boer War. The first contingent of soldiers left for South Africa in February 1900. Paget was one of three brothers--Henry, Sidney Edward (1860-1908), and Walter Stanley ...
Contributed by Brown University Library
In Memoriam. An Address, on the Occasion of the Service in Memory of Queen Victoria, February 2, 1901
“In Memoriam” is an address delivered by Alfred R. Tucker (1849–1914), bishop of Uganda, in the Cathedral Church of Saint Paul, Mengo, Uganda, on February 2, 1901, on the occasion of the service in memory of Queen Victoria, who had died on January 22. Tucker thanked God for Victoria’s “life and noble example,” her “wise and sympathetic rule,” and “that high and holy courage with which she bore the burdens of state.” Victoria’s reign, he concluded, “will stand out as the brightest and most glorious page in ...
An Address in Memory of King Edward VII, May 20, 1910
This document is an address delivered by Alfred R. Tucker (1849–1914), bishop of Uganda, in the Cathedral Church of Saint Paul, Mengo, Uganda, on May 20, 1910, on the occasion of the service in memory of King Edward VII, who had died on May 6. Edward was born in 1841, and became king of Great Britain and Ireland in 1901, following the death of his mother, Queen Victoria. Tucker characterized Edward as “a Sovereign whose name I venture to think will go down to posterity as ‘Edward the Peacemaker ...