33 results in English
Products of Mexico and Central America
This black-and-white sketch map showing the products of Mexico and Central America was prepared for publication in the Bulletin of the Pan American Union. It is now preserved in the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States, successor organization to the Pan American Union. Typed or written on the map are the locations of centers of both agricultural and mineral production. The map shows mineral production located mainly in Mexico, with asphalt, coal, gold, lead, petroleum, precious stones (opals), quicksilver (mercury), and silver listed. Mexico is also shown ...
Map of Bolivia, Showing Forest and Agriculture Areas, and Mineral Localities
This 1912 map shows the agricultural, forest, and mineral wealth of Bolivia. Mineral production is shown as located mainly in the western part of the country, in or near the Andes Mountains. The locations of mines producing antimony, bismuth, copper, gold, lead, silver, wolfram, and tin, Bolivia’s most important mineral product, are indicated. Tin was mined in the departments of Cochabamba, La Paz, Oruro, and Potosí. Production boomed in the late-19th century–early 20th century, as the extension of the rail line to Oruro made possible the export of ...
Salmon Canneries of the Pacific Northwest
In the late 19th century, salmon canneries became a major industry along the Pacific coastline of the United States and Canada. American fishing interests in the Pacific Northwest pressed for the Alaska Purchase in 1867 and strongly shaped regional politics up until the turn of the 20th century. Imperial Russia had imposed limits on Americans fishing in Alaskan waters. After Russia sold Alaska to the United States in 1867, Americans gained access to new fishing grounds, including some of the world’s best salmon runs. The combination of access to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cart Production. Cart Assembly
This photograph is from the trades (economic) part of Turkestan Album,a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Commerce with Cast-iron and Copper Wares and the Manufacture of Copper Wares. Knife Grinder
This photograph is from the trades (economic) part of Turkestan Album,a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Small Commerce. Jewish Distillery
This photograph is from the trades (economic) part of Turkestan Album,a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Grading Dried Tea. Yangloudong Village, Hubei Province, China, 1874
In 1874-75, the Russian government sent a research and trading mission to China to seek out new overland routes to the Chinese market, report on prospects for increased commerce and locations for consulates and factories, and gather information about the Dungan Revolt then raging in parts of western China. Led by Lieutenant Colonel Iulian A. Sosnovskii of the army General Staff, the nine-man mission included a topographer, Captain Matusovskii; a scientific officer, Dr. Pavel Iakovlevich Piasetskii; Chinese and Russian interpreters; three non-commissioned Cossack soldiers; and the mission photographer, Adolf Erazmovich ...
Tea Drying and Roasting before Transportation. Yangloudong Village, Hubei Province, China, 1874
In 1874-75, the Russian government sent a research and trading mission to China to seek out new overland routes to the Chinese market, report on prospects for increased commerce and locations for consulates and factories, and gather information about the Dungan Revolt then raging in parts of western China. Led by Lieutenant Colonel Iulian A. Sosnovskii of the army General Staff, the nine-man mission included a topographer, Captain Matusovskii; a scientific officer, Dr. Pavel Iakovlevich Piasetskii; Chinese and Russian interpreters; three non-commissioned Cossack soldiers; and the mission photographer, Adolf Erazmovich ...
Tea Wholesaler Testing and Tasting Teas. Yangloudong Village, Hubei Province, China, 1874
In 1874-75, the Russian government sent a research and trading mission to China to seek out new overland routes to the Chinese market, report on prospects for increased commerce and locations for consulates and factories, and gather information about the Dungan Revolt then raging in parts of western China. Led by Lieutenant Colonel Iulian A. Sosnovskii of the army General Staff, the nine-man mission included a topographer, Captain Matusovskii; a scientific officer, Dr. Pavel Iakovlevich Piasetskii; Chinese and Russian interpreters; three non-commissioned Cossack soldiers; and the mission photographer, Adolf Erazmovich ...
Thousands of Live Alligators on Free Exhibition
This broadside, dating from about 1950, is an advertisement for Osky’s, also known as Osky’s Curio Shop or Osky’s Alligator Store, a Jacksonville mercantile store that sold gift items, rare or bizarre decorative items, and goods made out of alligator skin, including lamps, purses, and wallets. The shop also exhibited live alligators and other reptiles. Jacksonville was home to many of Florida’s earliest tourist attractions, including the Florida Alligator Farm. Operating for several decades on Jacksonville’s historic Bay Street, Osky’s promoted itself through postcards ...
Gathering Rubber Sap, Java, Indonesia
This photograph of workers at a rubber plantation in Java, Indonesia is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Large Proportion of Interior Ireland Consists of Bogs from Which Peat Is Dug
This photograph of a peat cutter and a woman at a bog in Ireland is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Tapping a Rubber Tree, Motagua Valley, Guatemala
This photograph from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress shows a man tapping a rubber tree in the valley of the Motagua River in Guatemala. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Braden Copper Mines, Sewell, Chile
This photograph from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress shows the Braden Copper Mines in the town of Sewell, located on the slopes of the Andes Mountains in Cachapoal Province, Chile. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
An Earthen Hell. The Women Dressed in Rags Stand All Day in Hot Oil Shoveling up the Refuse to a Terrace above Them and Thence into Cars So That Not a Speck of Oil Is Wasted...
This 1923 photograph depicting a scene from the early history of the petroleum industry in Romania is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Zero Job! Shoveling Out Refuse from the Hot Pools of Oil That Comes up from a Spouting Well
This 1923 photograph depicting a scene from the early history of the petroleum industry in Romania is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Successive Stages of Grinding a Stone Egg. Imperial Lapidary Works, Ekaterinburg
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, urban settings, and natural scenes. In 1909 and 1910 he photographed extensively in the Urals region, including the city of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). Founded in 1751, the Ekaterinburg Lapidary Factory was the first of its kind in Russia. Located in the center of town at City Pond, it had a dedicated water mill to facilitate the laborious functions of cutting, grinding ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Tea Factory in Chakva. Chinese Foreman Lau-Dzhen-Dzhau
By the beginning of the 20th century, the plantation and processing plants at Chakva, Georgia, north of the port of Batumi, had become one of the main suppliers of tea to the Russian Empire. Seen here is the leading Chinese specialist at the Chakva tea plantation, Lau-Dzhan-Dzhau, who is dressed in a traditional Chinese style. Proudly displayed on his silk tunic is a Russian medal in recognition of his substantial contribution to the demanding and highly profitable cultivation of tea. Behind him are carefully tended trellised rows of plants arranged ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Drying Ovens for Tea. Tea Factory in Chakva
In 1905 and again in 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) traveled and photographed extensively in the Caucasus region, including in the territory of Georgia and along the coast of the Black Sea. The various kingdoms of the southern Caucasus were dominated by the Ottoman Empire beginning in the first half of the 16th century. In the 19th century the Russian Empire expanded into the area, particularly following the conclusion of the Caucasian War in 1864. With its mild climate along the Black Sea near the Turkish border ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Packaging Department. Borzhom
In 1905, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) traveled and photographed extensively in the Caucasus region. In 1912, Prokudin-Gorskii returned to photograph the dramatic landscape and ancient monuments of the mountainous interior of the Caucasus region. He also photographed Borzhom (present-day Borjomi), located in the Borjomi Gorge in south-central Georgia. Long occupied by the Ottoman Empire, the Borjomi area came under Russian control in the 1820s and developed into a resort known for its waters. In 1871, the town was granted to Grand Duke Mikhail Nikolaevich (1832–1909), who ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Weighing Tea: Ceylon
This photograph of work in the tea industry of Ceylon is from the George Grantham Bain Collection at the Library of Congress. The collection contains approximately 40,000 glass plate negatives and 50,000 photographic prints, most dating from the 1900s to the mid-1920s. Bain, who was born in 1865 and died in 1944, founded the New York-based Bain News Service in 1898. Specializing in news about New York City and to a lesser degree the eastern United States, Bain distributed its own pictures, and those purchased from other commercial ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Village of Razsolnaia. Extraction of Brown Iron Ore. Chusovaia River
The Chusovaya River originates in the southern Urals, flows some 590 kilometers to the northwest, and empties into the Kama River near the city of Perm. Bounded in many places by high, rocky cliffs, the Chusovaya was known for its dramatic scenery. The village of Rassol’naia, shown here, is perched on the riverbank, with a forest of tall firs in the background. Among the barns and sheds is a large two-story log house. The original caption indicates that this area was a source for rich brown iron ore. A ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Men Crafting Feluccas and Canoes, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows two men at work building boats in Barbacoas (present-day Nariño Department), Colombia. Located in the far southwest of Colombia near the border with Ecuador, Barbacoas is both a town and was the name of a province when Paz painted this picture. The man on the left is finishing a canoe. Behind the individual on the right is a felucca, inside the rough shelter. Transport of goods by river to the Pacific Ocean was an important aspect of the provincial economy of ...
Cigar Maker, Province of Cauca
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a cigar maker, a common sight in 19th-century Colombia, where tobacco was an important export crop. The woman is sitting on the floor of the shop rolling tobacco leaves, while a man wearing a ruana (poncho) enters the shop carrying a basket. In the background are blue sky and a palm tree. The scene is set in the Province of Cauca (present-day Cauca Department) in southwest Colombia. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the ...
Franklin Marble Mantel Manufactory, Race Street between 6th and 7th Street, Philadelphia
This lithograph of 1831 depicts the Franklin Marble Mantel Manufactory, located on Race Street between 6th and 7th Streets in Philadelphia. A sign on the facade of the building advertises “Marble Mantels, Tombs &c. neatly executed by Peter Fritz.” Workmen are seen on the sidewalk alongside the building while a clerk looks out the front door. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an Account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes, who was active in the city between about 1825 and 1855. Born in England circa 1773, Breton immigrated to Philadelphia around 1824. In the late 1820s, he contributed illustrations to Annals of Philadelphia, compiled by the antiquarian John F. Watson. In 1829 Breton entered the lithographic trade to execute the illustrations for the Annals. He worked extensively with the firm of Kennedy & Lucas, operated by David Kennedy and William B. Lucas, which produced Annals of Philadelphia. Breton also contributed to other publications at this time, including Mease and Porter's Picture of Philadelphia, also produced by Kennedy & Lucas, the first commercial lithographers in Philadelphia.
View of Robert Buist's City Nursery and Greenhouses. Number 140 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, 1846
This advertising print from 1846 depicts a bird's-eye view looking northwest at the enclosed nursery and greenhouses of Robert Buist, located on 12th Street, south of Lombard Street, in Philadelphia. Two long rows of hotbed frames extend west from 12th Street and run the length of Rodman Street behind a three-story building marked "140" (a preconsolidation address, i.e., from before the Act of Consolidation of 1854, a law passed by the Pennsylvania General Assembly that consolidated many smaller municipalities into the City of Philadelphia). Men and women stroll ...
John Baird, Steam Marble Works. Ridge Road Northwest of Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia
This tinted lithograph from circa 1848 is an advertisement showing an exterior view of the Ridge Road entrance to the “Spring Garden Marble Mantle Manufactory” and “Steam Marble Works” in Philadelphia owned by John Baird. The factory was erected in 1846, and included a central courtyard, offices, and an adjoining yard, marked here with a sign reading, “Garden Statuary, Vases, Ornamental Sculpture, &c.” A variety of fountains, vases, and statues are displayed on the platform roof covering the yard. Outside the fence enclosing the adjoining yard gravestones are displayed. On ...
John C. Baker and Company, Wholesale Dealers and Importers of Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Paints and Dye Stuffs. Number 100, North Third Street, Philadelphia
This advertising print from 1849 shows the five-story storefront, adorned with signage and an ornamental ironwork balcony, of the druggist located at 100 North Third Street, Philadelphia. A patron enters the establishment as a crate is hoisted in front of him. To the left, the window and second entrance of the building are open, and casks, jugs, bottles, and boxes line a wall of shelves and the floor. Additional inventory is visible near the upper windows. A clerk oversees the loading of a cart with boxes and barrels, while pedestrians ...
Thomas Hargrave, Ornamental Carver and Sculptor. Southwest Corner of Ridge Road and 13th Street
This advertising print from circa 1848 shows the facade of the three-story business and the adjacent marble yard located at North 13th Street and Ridge Avenue in Philadelphia (east of North Broad Street and north of Spring Garden Street). Signage on the business facade reads: “Thomas Hargrave. Monuments Tombs &c.” Under the front window, another sign advertises: "Union Refectory. Oysters Terrapins & Game in Season by Charles Epley.” A female patron is seen entering the doorway of the Hargrave establishment. Next to her, displayed in the front window, is a monument adorned with a reclining figure. A male patron descends the stairs to the oyster cellar. On the sidewalk outside, a man and a boy admire the sepulchral monuments and headstones that crowd the adjacent fenced, marble yard. Many of the monuments and headstones are ornamented; ornamentations include eagles, urns, a reclining female figure, a standing statue, and the inscription "Mother." In the street, a horse-drawn cart is positioned to receive goods near a stopped omnibus labeled, "Girard College & Green Hill Chesnut [sic] and Thirteenth." A ...
J.E. and B. Schell. City Marble Works and Steam Mantel Factory. Corner of Tenth and Vine Streets, Philadelphia
This advertisement from around 1854 shows a corner view of the three-building showroom and factory operated by the Schells at Tenth and Vine Streets in Philadelphia, from 1853 to 1856. J.E. Schell continued the business as J.E. Schell & Company starting in 1857. Patrons are seen entering the four-story storefront and mantel room adorned with signage reading, “J.E. & B. Schell” and “City Marble Works.” Statuary is displayed on a second-floor veranda. At the corner, a coach waits, and the disembarked African American driver stands at the ready. On ...
Dunlap's Phoenix Coach Works. Corner of Fifth and Buttonwood Streets, Philadelphia
This circa 1856 advertising print details the industrial complex for the "Phoenix Coach Works" located on the 400 block of Buttonwood Street in Philadelphia. The complex includes a four-story main building with street signs indicating the building is at the corner of Buttonwood and Fifth Streets; large signage at the top of the building reads: “Phoenix Coach Works” and “Dunlap’s Carriage Factory.” The main building is connected to additions and to the smaller "General Coach Furnishing Store." Several smokestacks and a tower decorated with the model of a carriage ...
Donnelly's Match Manufactory. Linden Street near the Stone Bridge, Philadelphia
This 1847 lithograph by an unknown artist advertises the steam patent match manufactory of John Donnelly, located south of Front Street near the Delaware River, in Philadelphia. Signage covers the three-story building, reading: “Donnelly’s Steam Patent Match Manufactory,” and “Linden Street Near the Stone Bridge.” White lettering on the roof reads, “Kensington Match Manufactory.” A small sign for “Donnelly’s Match Manufactory” hangs near the top of the short side of the building. Male and female workers are visible at many of the windows lining the building. Workers also ...
H. S. Tarr's Marble Yard. Number 274 Green Street above Seventh Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
This advertising print from around 1858 shows a view of the marble yard fronted by a triple arch adorned with plaques, the adjoining three-story office building, and rear factory of the establishment at Green Street north of Seventh Street. From the sidewalk, laid with decorative black and white tile, a lady with a parasol and a gentleman admire the ornate obelisks and monuments within the yard. Several of the pieces display patriotic details, urns, and statuary. Plaques on the arches include the name of the business in addition to text ...