236 results in English
Great Trading Routes of the Sahara
This 1889 map of trans-Saharan trading routes by French explorer Edouard Blanc reflects the growing priority that Europeans gave to land-based trade during the late 19th-century imperial “scramble for Africa.” In articles about his work, Blanc stressed the importance of identifying “natural” geographic routes that would connect French colonial possessions in west Africa, such as Senegal, to Algeria in north Africa, and link the Mediterranean coast to Sudan and central Africa. Blanc based his maps not only on his own travels but also on nearly a century of reports from ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Guide to Kiev and Its Environs, Including an Address Section, Map and Phototype Views of Kiev
This 1890 guidebook provides comprehensive information for visitors to Kiev. It includes a history of the city and details of places of interest, such as Kiev-Pechersk Lavra, the cathedrals and other churches, historical monuments, public gardens and wooded areas, public and administrative buildings, and bridges over the Dnieper River. Included is useful information for travelers, such as timetables for trains, steamships, and other passenger transport and a directory for hotels, restaurants, doctors, banks, stores, baths, libraries, clubs, and city and church authorities. The guide anticipates by 24 years Baedeker’s ...
Memoirs of Babur
This book is a lithograph edition of the Persian translation of Bāburnāmah (Memoirs of Babur), the autobiography of Ẓahīr al-Dīn Muḥammad Bāburshāh (1483–1530), the first Mughal emperor of India. Bāburnāmah originally was written in Chagatai Turkish and was translated into Persian during the reign of the Mughal emperor Akbar. The translation was undertaken by Bairam Khan (died 1561), an Afghan bureaucrat and military commander who served under Emperor Humayun and who was briefly appointed regent over his successor, Emperor Akbar, when Akbar was a child. This book was printed ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Costa Rica
This map of Costa Rica was published by the International Bureau of the American Republics (instituted in 1910 as the Pan American Union), an agency established in 1890 in Washington D.C., by resolution of the International Conference of American States. The bureau published handbooks, maps, and a monthly bulletin for disseminating information relating to the promotion of trade among the countries of the Americas. The map shows the routes of steamship lines from the ports of Limon, Puntarenas, and San Juan del Sur (Nicaragua); undersea telegraph cables; railroads; and ...
Ciniselli Circus Water Pantomime
This poster by an unknown artist is devoted to the Ciniselli Circus water pantomime (probably The Four Elements). Produced in Berlin by the firm Dinse & Eckert, the picture is a colored lithograph with the letters written in gold. The water pantomime was performed for the first time in Russia in 1892. In The Four Elements, water rushed down in a cascade and fountains gushed out in different places of the arena. Deer, elephants, and horses with riders swam in the arena lake. Pantomime, an art form in which the ...
Tales of Heroes and Great Men of Old
Siyar al-Abtal wa-al-Uzama’ al-Qudama’ (Tales of heroes and great men of old) introduces young readers to classical mythology. It typifies many publications of the British and American missionaries in the Levant in the mid-to-late 19th century. Uplifting humanistic writing of this kind was new to the Middle East. It grew directly from the children’s book movement in Britain in the first half of the century, led by the British Tract Society, which later reinforced the efforts of American missionaries to the Middle East, such as Cornelius Van Dyck. The ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
Across the Border, or Pathan and Biloch
Across the Border, or Pathan and Biloch is a work of ethnographic description by little-known English writer Edward Emmerson Oliver. It deals with the Afghan and Baluch tribes of the northwest frontier of British India bordering Afghanistan (in what is today Pakistan) and of Afghanistan itself. The book is in a long line of British writing about these territories going back to the foundational study of Mountstuart Elphinstone (1779−1859‏), An Account of the Kingdom of Caubul and its Dependencies in Persia, Tartary, and India, published in 1815. Unlike Elphinstone ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Japanese House of Representatives Member Certificate of Mutsu Munemitsu
The first election to the House of Representatives, the lower house of the Japanese Diet, was held on July 1, 1890, with 300 seats to be filled. The franchise was limited to about one percent of the total population. Mutsu Munemitsu, minister of agriculture in the first cabinet of Kōshaku (Prince) Yamagata Aritomo  (1838—1922), the first prime minister under Japan’s new parliamentary system, won a seat in the House of Representatives in his home region of Wakayama. He was the only member of the cabinet to become a ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
The Eastern Basin of the Mediterranean, the Red Sea, and the Persian Gulf
This undated Italian map of the Middle East was published by the firm G.B. Paravia of Turin, Italy. It is a political map marking the boundaries of states and empires at the date of printing, probably at the very end of the 19th century. A clue to dating is the designation of Somalia Italiana (Italian Somalia). A series of Italian protectorates was established in the Horn of Africa beginning in the late 1880s, indicating that the map was produced after that time. International political boundaries are indicated by colored ...
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: Cloth-Beating Moon - Yūgiri
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: As I am About to Enter the Ranks of Those Who Disobey/ Ever More Brightly Shines/ The Moon of the Summer Night - Akashi Gidayū
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: Kazan Temple Moon
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: Frost Fills the Camp and the Autumn Air is Still/ Lines of Returning Geese Cross the Moon of the Third Hour - Kenshin
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: Moon of Kintoki Mountain
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: Moon of the Lonely House
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: How Noisy, the Sound of Insects Calling in the Meadow/ As for Me, I Make No Sound but Think of Love
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: Hōrin Temple Moon - Yokobue
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: Pleasure is This/ To Lie Cool under the Moonflower Bower/ The Man in His Undershirt, the Woman in Her Slip
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Comprehensive Map of Vietnam’s Provinces
This undated brush and ink manuscript map of Vietnam during the 19th century combines features of the traditional cartography practiced in both China and Vietnam with some Western elements. The place names and a text block in the lower right-hand corner are in classical Chinese calligraphy, the writing system used by both Chinese and Vietnamese scholar-officials. Traditional elements include its pictorial style (mountains, trees, and structures such as the border gate between Vietnam and China), lack of precise scale, and emphasis on mountains and water. A large number of mountains ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Members of Gaucho Tribe, Argentina
This photograph of gauchos at work in Argentina is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Immigrants Being Transported on Horse-Drawn Wagon, Buenos Aires, Argentina
This photograph of newly arrived immigrants in Buenos Aires, Argentina is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Busload of Immigrants, Buenos Aires, Argentina
This photograph of immigrants in Buenos Aires, Argentina is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Entrance to the Temple of Jupiter
This photograph depicting the ruins of the entrance to the Temple of Jupiter in Baalbek, Lebanon, is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Barbados, Native Huts
This photograph is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives. The easternmost island in the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Fredericksborg Castle, Copenhagen, Denmark
This photochrome print is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It shows Fredericksborg Castle as it appeared in the last decade of the 19th century. The 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden, and Denmark: Handbook for Travellers offered the following information about the castle: “This palace was erected in 1602-20 by Christian IV in a plain and vigorous Renaissance style, on the site of an older building of Frederick II. The massive edifice, which consists ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Royal Theater, Copenhagen, Denmark
This photochrome print is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It shows the Royal, or National Theater, which is identified in the 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden, and Denmark: Handbook for Travellers as “a handsome Renaissance structure by Petersen and Dahlerup, built in 1872-74.” To the right and left of the entrance are bronze statues of the Danish poets Ludvig Holberg (1684-1754) and Adam Oehlenschläger (1779-1850). The theater is located on Kongens Nytorv (King ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Saviour Church, Copenhagen, Denmark
This photochrome print from circa 1890-1900 is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It shows Our Savior’s Church (Vor Frelsers Kirke), a large baroque church in the Christianshavn district of the city, that was built in 1682-96. The church was constructed in a Palladian-Netherlandic style for King Christian V by the court builder, Lambert van Haven (1630-95). Lauritz de Thurah (1706-59) designed the spire, which was completed in 1752, more than 50 years after the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Klampenborg Hermitage, with View of Park, Copenhagen, Denmark
This photochrome from circa 1890-1900 is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It shows the Eremitage Hunting Lodge in the Jaegersborg Deer Park near Klampenborg, Denmark, which was built in 1734-36 by King Christian VI for royal hunting dinners. The deer park was established in 1669 by King Frederik III as a private hunting reserve, and was opened to the public in 1756. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Tivoli Park Entrance, Copenhagen, Denmark
This photochrome from circa 1890-1900 is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It shows the entrance to Tivoli Gardens, which opened in 1843, and is the second-oldest amusement park in the world (after Dyrehavsbakken, also in Denmark). The park was inspired by the romantic pleasure gardens of Europe, which were landscaped according to the naturalistic English tradition rather than the French style based on geometric lines. Tivoli's founder, Georg Carstensen (1812-57), had seen pleasure gardens ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Helsingborg, Sweden
This photochrome print is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section of the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts a ship entering the harbor at Helsingborg, Sweden, which, between 1874 and 1896, was connected to Copenhagen by regular ferry service. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
University, Belgrade, Servia
This photochrome print of Kapetan Misino zdanje (Captain Misa's building) in Belgrade, Serbia, is part of “Views of Belgrade, Serbia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. Built between 1858 and 1863, the structure was designed by Czech architect Jan Nevole (1812-1903). It was intended to be the residence of the wealthy merchant and proponent of education, Captain Misa Anastasijevic, who donated it to the city on the condition that it be used for educational and cultural pursuits. The building, with its many domes and portals, recalls the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Landing Place and Cathedral, Belgrade, Servia
This photochrome print of Belgrade as seen from the neighborhood of Kalemegdan is part of “Views of Belgrade, Serbia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. At the top of the hill is the Saborna Crkva (Cathedral church), the great Serbian Orthodox cathedral dedicated to St. Michael, built by Prince Miloš Obrenović in 1837-40. The waterway is the Sava River, which flows into the Danube River. The “landing space,” or the port of Sava, played a role in Belgrade's history since the Roman occupation in the 3rd century ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
From the West, Cetinje, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the town of Cetinje, the capital of Montenegro, an independent principality that separated from the Ottoman Empire in 1878. According to Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900), Cetinje had 3,000 inhabitants at the time. “In some respects the place resembles a little German country town, but it has several distinctive features of its own. It may be seen in an hour, but a whole day ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Convent, Cetinje, Montenegro
This late 19th-century photochrome print is part of “Views of Montenegro” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the Cetinje Monastery at the foot of Mount Lovćen in Cetinje. The monastery was built in 1701 by Bishop–Prince Danilo (1670–1735), the founder of the Petrović Njegoš dynasty, following the destruction by Venetian forces of the medieval Cetinje Monastery, a Serb Orthodox monastery built by Ivan the Black in 1484. The monastery has great historical significance for the Montenegrin people. It contains the remains of Saint Peter ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Arrival of the Post, Cetinje, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts a scene from Cetinje, the capital of Montenegro, an independent principality that separated from the Ottoman Empire in 1878. According to Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900), Cetinje, a town of about 3,000 inhabitants, was a two-day excursion by mountainous road from the town of Catarro (present-day Kotor) on the Adriatic coast. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
General View, Njegus, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts a view from Njegus, characterized by Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900) as “the ancestral home of the reigning family and the cradle of the Montenegrin wars of independence.” The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Inn di Krstac on the Cetinje Road, Njegus, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900) recommended that European and American travelers of this period take a two-day excursion to Montenegro--from the port city of Catarro (present-day Kotor) to Cetinje, the then-capital of Montenegro. This photochrome print depicts a scene along the road in the town of Njegus, which Baedeker identified as “the ancestral home of the reigning family and the cradle of the Montenegrin wars of independence ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
General View, Thal von Rieka, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900) recommended that European and American travelers of this period take a two-day excursion to Montenegro--from the port city of Catarro (present-day Kotor) to Cetinje, the then-capital of Montenegro. This photochrome print shows a scene on the road from Cetinje to the town of Rjeka, noted by Baedeker for its splendid mountain views. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Fish Market, Bergen, Norway
This photochrome print from the “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company shows the Bergen fish market as it looked in the last decade of the 19th century. According to the 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark: Handbook for Travellers, “fish has always been the staple commodity of Bergen, which is the greatest fish-mart in Norway. The Hanseatic merchants compelled the northern fishermen to send their fish to Bergen, and to the present day the trade still flows mainly ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Storthings Bygningen, Christiania, Norway
The Storthings Byningen is the hall of the Norwegian parliament, which was completed in 1866. This photomechanical print from the Detroit Publishing Company shows how it appeared in the last decade of the 19th century. Oslo, the present-day capital of Norway, was called Christiania from 1624 to 1878 (Kristiania from 1878 to 1924). It was named after King Christian IV of Denmark, which was part of a Nordic union with Norway for more than 400 years.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Oscarshal, Christiania, Norway
According to the 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark, the “château of Oscarshall was erected in the English Gothic style by Nebelong for King Oscar I in 1849-52, and adorned with paintings by eminent Norwegian artists. It was sold to the government by Charles XV, but it is still kept up as a royal residence. It deserves a visit for the sake of its pictures and the view.” This photomechanical print from the Detroit Publishing Company shows how a late 19th-century tourist would have approached ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Norwegian Carriage, Hardanger Fjord, Norway
This photochrome print of a Norwegian girl in a carriage at Hardanger Fjord in Norway is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. In his Peeps at Many Lands: Norway (1909) the British travel writer A.F. Ferryman-Mockler observed that "all that is grand, all that is beautiful, will be found in the Hardanger.” The fjord, located in southern Norway, is approximately five kilometers miles wide at its center and more than 650 meters deep in some places. The fjord is ...
Contributed by Library of Congress