16 results in English
Personal Narrative of a Year’s Journey through Central and Eastern Arabia (1862–63)
William Gifford Palgrave (1826–88) was a famous English traveler to Arabia who inspired a generation of European explorers and missionaries. He became fluent in Arabic while serving as a Jesuit missionary in Syria. In 1862 he undertook a year-long journey through the Arabian Peninsula with the stated aim of studying the “moral, political, and intellectual conditions of living Arabia.” He was also working as a secret agent for the French emperor, Napoleon III (1808–73). Palgrave disguised himself as a Syrian doctor and was accompanied by his assistant, Barakāt ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Porte Maillot. The Great Battery from the Left. May 14th, 1871, 5:30 AM, under Fire of Mont Valérien
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
Pilgrimage to the Caaba and Charing Cross
Hafiz Ahmed Hassan was an Indian Muslim, treasurer and advisor to the nawab of Tonk, Muhammad ‘Ali Khan (died 1895). Tonk was a principality in northwest India and is today part of the state of Rajasthan. When the nawab was deposed in 1867, the author accompanied him into exile, going first to Benares and then, in 1870, to the Muslim holy cities on pilgrimage. After completing thehajj, Hafiz proceeded to England where he spent a short time before returning to India. The focus of the book is his travel ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
Porte Maillot. The Great Battery from the Right. May 14th, 1871, 5:30 AM, under Fire of Mont Valérien
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
Turkestan Album, Industrial Crafts and Trades Part
In the mid-to-late 19th century, the Russian Empire expanded into Central Asia, annexing territories located in present-day Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan. Tsar Alexander II approved the establishment of the governor-generalship of Russian Turkestan in 1867. General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general, commissioned the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of the region that includes some 1,200 photographs, along with architectural plans, watercolor drawings, and maps. The work is in four parts, spanning six large, leather-bound volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
La Renaxensa, Volume 1, Number 1, 1 February 1871
La Renaixensa was the first periodical written entirely in Catalan since 1714, when King Philip V of Spain banned the language. La Renaixensa (La Renaxensa between 1871 and 1876) takes its name from the movement that was born at the end of 18th century and early in the 19th with the cautious writing of some works in Catalan. The magazine was founded in 1871 as a literary magazine and appeared twice a month. Two years later it began to include political articles, which led to it being suspended in 1878 ...
Recipients of the Cross of Saint George, Awarded with the Highest Military Honor. For the Capture of Chin-cha-go-zi June 18, 1871: Private Federov and Non-Commissioned Officer Sergeev of the Turkestan Sapper Unit
This photograph is from the historical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The compiler of the first three parts was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Battle over Chin-cha-go-zi and Siege of the City. June 18, 1871
This topographical map shows battle plans for the Russian assault on Chin-cha-go-zi, located in the northwestern part of Xinjiang province, China. The battle was part of the Russian invasion of the Ili River region. During the Dungan Revolt of 1864, this region had come under the control of the Muslim Dungans and Taranchis, who had overthrown the Qing authority and established the Taranchi Sultanate. The Russians captured the town of Chin-cha-go-zi with a quick artillery offensive on June 18, 1871, and a few days later entered Ghulja, capital of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Battle over Suidun. June 19, 1871
This topographical map shows battle plans for the Russian assault on the citadel at Suidun (present-day Shuiding), located in the northwestern part of Xinjiang province, China. The capture of Suidun took place on June 19, 1871, and was part of the Russian invasion of the Ili River region. During the Dungan Revolt of 1864, this region had come under the control of the Muslim Dungans and Tarachis, who had overthrown the Qing authority and established the Taranchi Sultanate. Following their victories at Chin-cha-go-zi and Suidun, the Russians temporarily assumed control ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Bird's Eye View of the City of Little Rock, the Capitol of Arkansas, 1871
This panoramic map shows Little Rock, Arkansas, as it appeared in 1871. Little Rock, the capital of Arkansas, was officially incorporated in 1831. The area had been named in the 18th century for a rock formation near the Arkansas River by French explorer Jean-Baptiste Bénard de la Harpe (1683–1765). In this view, the city streets can be seen laid out in an orderly fashion and extending away from the Arkansas River. Numerous vessels traverse the river or are docked along the shore; some vessel names are visible, such as ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Bird's Eye View of the City of Atlanta, the Capitol of Georgia, 1871
This panoramic map shows Atlanta, Georgia, as it appeared in 1871. The town sprang up at the confluence of the Chattahoochee River and Peachtree Creek; it later became a railroad settlement, located at the intersection of the Western & Atlantic Railroad and the Georgia Railroad. The capital of Georgia was moved to Atlanta in 1868. The importance of the railroad to the area is evident in this map, which shows a view looking northeast over the city. The railroad depot (Union Depot) is visible near the center of the image, with ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Antiquities of Samarkand. Tomb of the Saint Kusam-ibn-Abbas (Shah-i Zindah) and Adjacent Mausoleums. Grave Where the Sepulcher of the Saint Stands. Grave of the Saint Kusam-ibn-Abbas (Shah-i Zindah) Who Died in 57 A.H.
This sketch of the interior of the Kusam-ibn-Abbas Mausoleum in the northern cluster of shrines at the Shah-i Zindah necropolis in Samarkand is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72, under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire's Central Asian territories were called. The album devotes special attention to Samarkand’s Islamic architecture, such as 14th- and 15th-century monuments from the reign of Timur (Tamerlane) and his successors. The Shah-i ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Syr-Darya Oblast. Ruins of the City of Sauran. Taken in 1871
This photograph of the ruined walls of the city of Sauran, located in the southern part of present-day Kazakhstan, is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire’s Central Asian territories were called. The caption notes that the photograph was taken in 1871, when the area was part of the Syr-Darya Province, named after the Syr-Darya River. Sauran (also known as Savran) was ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Turkestan Album, Archaeological Part
This work is the “Archaeological Part” of the Turkestan Album, which contains a detailed visual record of the Islamic architecture of Samarkand as it appeared shortly after the Russian conquest in the 1860s. The mid-to-late 19th century was when the Russian Empire expanded into Central Asia, annexing territories located in present-day Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan. Russian armies occupied Tashkent in 1865 and Samarkand in 1868. Tsar Alexander II approved the establishment of the governor-generalship of Russian Turkestan in 1867. General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
China: A Manchu Bride
This photograph by the great Scottish traveler, geographer, and photographer John Thomson (1837-1921) shows a young woman of the Manchu ethnic group in her wedding dress. She is dressed in a richly embroidered costume and a large floral headdress with tassels. Her face is powdered white. As an ethnographer, Thomson took many photographs of brides in lavish costumes, but he also expressed a gloomy view of the brides’ future lives, which he compared to slavery. "No Manchu maiden can be betrothed until she is fourteen years of age. Usually some ...
Contributed by Wellcome Library
Sermons
This manuscript, dated 1871, contains a selection of 87 homilies of John Chrysostom (circa 347–407), a church father and archbishop of Constantinople. Chrysostom originally wrote in Greek, but he was commonly read in Arabic translations, especially by Coptic and Melkite readers. This particular collection of 87 sermons remains extant in several manuscripts. This copy, however, lacks sermon 15, although the copyist indicates its subject: the casting out of Satan from the man dwelling among the tombs (see Mark 5:1-20). The Orthodox and Eastern Catholic churches honor John Chrysostom ...