12 results in English
Kiev Caves and the Kiev-Pechersk Lavra
This book, published in Kiev in 1864, is a history and description of Kiev-Pechersk Lavra, also called the Monastery of the Kiev Caves (pechera means cave; lavra indicates a monastery of status), a large complex founded in 1051 by a monk named Anthony in caves dug out of the hillside. The monastery soon became the center of Christianity in Russia and played an important part in local cultural development, housing the first printing press in Kiev and famous chroniclers, writers, physicians, scientists, and artists. Kiev-Pechersk Lavra is the most important ...
Johnson’s Turkey in Asia, Persia, Arabia, etc.
This map of the Middle East and Central and South Asia extending from the Nile Valley to the boundary of Afghanistan with British India is from Johnson’s New Illustrated Family Atlas, published in New York in 1864. The map shows national capitals, provincial capitals, principal towns, and railroads. The Suez Canal, under construction at this time, is shown as proposed. The map provides a detailed overview of the towns and cities along the Nile in Egypt, Nubia (present-day southern Egypt and northern Sudan), and Sennar (present-day Sudan), and of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Commentary on the Mysteries of Revelation, the Perfection of Locution, and Comprehensive Interpretation
Al-Kashshāf (Commentary) is among the most widely known tafsirs (explications or exegeses) of the Qurʼan. Written in 12th-century Persia by Mahmud ibn ʻUmar Zamakhshari, it remains the object of study and debate among exegetes, who argue against its Mu’tazilite rationalism, even as they recognize its deep learning and linguistic sophistication. The work is taught, if not admired, by all the Sunni and Shia schools of interpretation. Modern scholar Kifayat Ullah states that “no other work in the history of tafsir has been commented on in the forms of glosses ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
Assault and Siege of the Fortified City of Chimkent from September 19–25, 1864
This topographic map shows the Russian battle plan for the siege of Chimkent (also seen as Shymkent, in present-day southern Kazakhstan) in September 1864, when Russian forces under General Cherniaev captured the city by defeating the forces of the Kokand khanate. The map is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Recipients of the Cross of Saint George, Awarded with the Highest Military Honor. For the Capture of the City of Turkestan on June 12, 1864: Professional Soldiers Tatarinov, Prokof'ev, and Kashin
This photograph is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The compiler of the first three parts was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Parade at the Palace Square on the Occasion of the Wedding of Princess Isabel and the Count d'Eu
The Thereza Christina Maria Collection consists of 21,742 photographs assembled by Emperor Pedro II and left by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a vast range of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and the Brazilian people in the 19th century, as well as includes many photographs from Europe, Africa, and North America. This photograph shows the parade celebrating the marriage of Princess Isabel, the daughter of Emperor Pedro II and Empress Thereza Christina Maria, with the Count of Eu on October, 15, 1864.
Spiritual Considerations on the Life of Saint Antony the Great
This manuscript is an Arabic translation of a work on the life of Saint Antony, the early Egyptian ascetic, originally written in Latin by a Jesuit priest. The work was translated by a Maronite priest named Alexander “for the benefit of those who seek perfection in the Christian religion.” It is made up of nine “considerations” or “contemplations” (ta’ammulat) on the saint’s life. The text was copied at the Mar Qubriyanus Kfifan monastery in Lebanon. Saint Antony the Great (circa 251—356) was a prominent leader among the ...
Moroccan State Trumpeters, 1864
This original gouache painting of 1864 is by the celebrated British artist, Sir John Gilbert (1817–97). It originally was thought to depict Moroccan state trumpeters, but many of Gilbert’s paintings are indistinct in terms of time and place and their exact subjects difficult to determine. Gilbert never traveled beyond Europe, but like many Victorian painters he was attracted to exoticism and to tales from Arabia, such as the story of Aladdin, and this piece reflects this interest in the exotic. One of the most prolific painters of his ...
Contributed by Brown University Library
Great Central Fair Buildings, Philadelphia
The Great Central (or Sanitary) Fair took place in Philadelphia in June 1864. The purpose of the fair, which featured art, craft, and historical exhibits, was to raise funds for the United States Sanitary Commission. This was a private organization during the American Civil War, which operated under the authority of the federal government to provide relief to soldiers and assistance to the Union army in matters relating to health and hygiene. The commission played a major role in mobilizing civilian support for the Union cause and represented the largest ...
Buildings of the Great Central Fair, in Aid of the U.S. Sanitary Commission, Logan Square, Philadelphia, June 1864
The Great Central Fair took place in Philadelphia in June 1864. The purpose of the fair, which featured art, craft, and historical exhibits, was to raise funds for the United States Sanitary Commission. This was a private organization that operated during the American Civil War under the authority of the federal government to provide relief to soldiers and assistance to the Union army in matters relating to health and hygiene. This print is a bird's-eye view of the exhibition grounds at Logan Square that was printed and for sale ...
Christ Church
This 1864 lithograph shows an exterior view looking northwest at Christ Church Episcopal church located at 22-34 North Second Street in Philadelphia. Christ Church was built between 1727 and 1744. The steeple was completed in 1754, after the designs of architects John Harrison and Robert Smith. The scene includes pedestrian traffic walking along both Second and Church Streets, a flock of birds near the weathervane and steeple, and in the foreground, trolley tracks running the length of Second Street. The artist, Charles P. Tholey (1832–95), was born in Germany ...
Christ Church Hospital
This 1864 lithograph shows an exterior view of the front facade of a hospital building constructed between 1856 and 1861 and located at 2100 North 49th Street in Philadelphia. The building was designed by architect John M. Gries (1827–62). Gothic architectural details can be seen in this image, including narrow pointed arched windows, gable roofs, pinnacles, and spires. A carriage drives away from the front entrance, using the same path pedestrians use to stroll on the grounds. The Christ Church Hospital was founded in 1772 by Dr. John Kearsley ...