9 results in English
Eastern Part of Canada, Translated from English from the Map by Jefferys Published in London in May 1755
Partie orientale du Canada (Eastern part of Canada) is a hand-colored manuscript map by cartographer, author, and illustrator Georges-Louis Le Rouge (born 1712), royal geographer to King Louis XV. It was based upon an English map made by Thomas Jefferys (circa 1719–71), who was geographer to King George III and engraved and published many maps and atlases in the mid-18th century, particularly of North America. It covers the northeastern region from Montreal to Île du Petit Mecatina and southwest to Boston Harbor. The map prominently displays the eastern part ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of Quebec City
Plan de la ville de Québec (Map of Quebec City) is by cartographer, author, and illustrator Georges-Louis Le Rouge (born 1712), royal geographer to King Louis XV. The map shows the Upper and Lower Towns of Quebec City near the confluence of the Saint Lawrence and Saint Charles Rivers. It has an index that indicates the location of churches, hospitals, redoubts, gardens, and batteries in and around the city. Located on the Saint Lawrence River, Quebec was an administrative, military, and commercial hub, as well as a religious center that ...
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Map of Bays, Harbors, and the Port of Placentia by the Island of Newfoundland
This map, Carte des bayes, rades et port de Plaisance dans l'Isle de Terre-Neuve (Map of bays, harbors, and the port of Placentia by the island of Newfoundland), was created by the French cartographer Jacques Nicolas Bellin (1703‒72) in 1755, based in part upon earlier geographic notations compiled by Pierre-François-Xavier de Charlevoix (1682−1761), a French Jesuit priest, historian, and explorer. The map shows the Avalon Peninsula in Newfoundland with the harbors of Placentia and Argentia. It also highlights a battery on Signal Hill above Placentia Road, as ...
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Niagara Falls, from 135 Feet
This engraving of Niagara Falls was made by Georges-Louis le Rouge (born 1712), royal geographer to King Louis XV, and published in Recueil des plans de l’Amérique septentrionale (Collection of the maps of North America) in 1755. The engraving depicts a view of the falls from an elevation of 135 feet (41.15 meters). In the foreground are four men: three Europeans, one of whom is in clerical garb holding a cross, and an Indian, who is possibly their guide. People can be seen walking up a path pictured ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Map of the British and French Dominions in North America with the Roads, Distances, Limits, and Extent of the Settlements
This landmark map of North America published in 1755 shows British sovereignty over large parts of the continent at the outset of the French and Indian War (1754–63). It is perhaps the most well-known 18th-century map of North America. Created by John Mitchell, a native Virginian who moved to London in his mid-thirties, the map was compiled using information provided by governors of the British colonies. Although territories of other European powers are shown, the map is biased toward British interests. French claims in the Mississippi and Ohio valleys ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Western part of New France, or Canada, Done by Mr. Bellin, Royal Marine Engineer, in Order to Further Understanding of Present-Day Political Matters in America
This detailed map of the Great Lakes region of western “New France” by Jacques Nicolas Bellin was published by the Heirs of Homan in 1755, shortly before the outbreak of the Seven Years’ War, the conflict that resulted in the transfer of New France to British hands. Bellin was just one representative of a greater movement by French royal and military cartographers in the 18th century to map New France using the knowledge possessed by Native Americans. This map shows details not only of the Canadian waterways, but also of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of Quebec, Capital of Canada
This illustrated map, from the Rochambeau Collection of the Library of Congress, presents a striking panorama of the City of Quebec during its last years as the capital of New France, the French colony of Canada. Drawn in 1755 by Royal Geographer Georges-Louis Le Rouge, the map identifies ten key sites throughout the city. Located on the St. Lawrence River, Quebec was an administrative, military, and commercial hub, as well as a religious center that was home to a cathedral, bishop’s palace, seminary, and Jesuit mission. Originally established in ...
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The Battle of the Monongahela
This manuscript pen-and-ink map shows the disposition of troops at the beginning of the Battle of Monongahela, which took place on July 9, 1755, in the second year of the French and Indian War. Determined to drive the French out of western Pennsylvania, the British had sent a force of 2,000 army regulars and colonial militia commanded by General Edward Braddock to capture Fort Duquesne, located at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers in what is now downtown Pittsburgh. After an arduous march through northern Virginia and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of the Country about the Mississippi, Circa 1755
A handwritten note on the back of this manuscript pen-and-ink map from around 1755 states: “Map of the country about the Mississippi. Drawn by Chegeree (the Indian) who says he has travelled through the country.” It is not known who Chegeree was, but he appears to have made the map for an anonymous British official early in the French and Indian War (1754–63). The map and accompanying notes portray the extent of French forces and troop strengths in the Ohio and Mississippi River valleys at the outset of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress