4 results in English
Bazaar of Isfahan
This photograph shows a part of the bazaar in Isfahan, Iran as it appeared in 1944. A bazaar is a marketplace or assemblage of shops where a wide variety of goods and services are displayed for trade. “Bazaar” is derived from the Persian word for “market,” and many believe that the bazaar is one of the most important landmarks of Persian civilization. Archaeologists have found evidence of bazaars in different parts of Iran, and scholars have concluded that the development of cities was based on not only a rising population ...
Different Views of the Major Cities in Persia
This map by the Nuremberg engraver and publisher Johann Baptist Homann (1663-1724) features 15 aerial views of cities in Persia (present-day Iran), Afghanistan, southern Russia, eastern Turkey, and the Caucasus region. Beneath each city portrait is a number or letter key indicating the most important points in each city, including city gates and walls, bodies of water, royal palaces, and markets. The cities depicted are (1) Astrakhan, Russia; (2) Derbent, Dagestan, Russia; (3) Tiflis, Georgia; (4) Kars, Turkey; (5) Erzurum, Turkey; (6) Baku, Azerbaijan; (7) Sultanieh (Zanjān Province), Iran; (8 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Behind the Veil in Persia and Turkish Arabia. An Account of an Englishwoman's Eight Years' Residence Amongst the Women of the East
Behind the Veil in Persia and Turkish Arabia: An Account of an Englishwoman's Eight Years' Residence Amongst the Women of the East is an account by Mary Hume-Griffith, the wife of Dr. Albert Hume-Griffith, a British medical missionary, of living and working in Persia (Iran) and the Turkish province of Mosul (in present-day northern Iraq) in the years 1900‒1908. While her husband was engaged in medical work, Mary Hume-Griffith spent much time in the company of women, whose culture behind closed doors in andarun (women’s quarters) she ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Quatrain on Reaching Divine Unity
This calligraphic fragment includes a rubaʻi (iambic pentameter quatrain) on the subject of spiritual transformation. At the top right, an invocation to God, Huwa al-ʻaziz (He is the Glorified), precedes the quatrain’s verses, which read: “When the close of my pain became the reason of my cure / My lowness changed into loftiness, and disbelief became faith / Spirit and heart and body were the obstacle to the path (toward God) / But now body became heart, heart became spirit, and spirit became the ‘Spirit of Spirits’.” The mystic describes his path ...
Contributed by Library of Congress