15 results in English
A Modern Depiction of Ireland, One of the British Isles
Abraham Ortelius (1527-98) was a Flemish engraver and businessman who traveled widely to pursue his commercial interests. In 1560 he became interested in scientific geography during a voyage with Gerardus Mercator. Ortelius’s major work, Theatrum orbis terrarum (Theater of the world), was published in Antwerp in 1570, at the threshold of the golden age of Dutch cartography. Theatrum presented the world in its component parts and reflected an age of exploration, broadened commercial connections, and scientific inquiry. Now considered the world’s first atlas, the original Theatrum was enhanced ...
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Sean Lester
Sean Lester (1888–1959) was an Irish journalist and government official who held important positions in the League of Nations. A Protestant who was educated at the Methodist College in Belfast, he nonetheless supported Irish independence and was a member of Sinn Fein. Following the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922, he joined the country’s foreign ministry and in 1929 became Ireland’s representative to the League of Nations. He chaired committees attempting to resolve territorial disputes between Peru and Colombia and between Bolivia and Paraguay, and ...
The Insurrection in Dublin
The Easter Rising of April 1916 was an attempt by Irish nationalists to provoke a nationwide rebellion and thereby secure Ireland’s independence from British rule. In fighting that was largely confined to Dublin, 60 insurgents and 130 troops and police were killed, along with 300 civilians caught in the crossfire. In the aftermath of the uprising the British executed another 15 conspirators, including Sir Roger Casement, a Protestant who had become an ardent Irish nationalist and who had sought to acquire weapons for the insurgents from Germany, Britain’s ...
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The "Graphic" Statistical Maps of Ireland
This set of six statistical maps provides an economic and demographic overview of Ireland in the first half of the 1880s. Color coding is used to show population density, education, religion, agricultural production, wealth (measured by the value of taxed property), and poverty for each of the 32 counties. Small tables in the lower right of each map provide the same data in numerical form for the four provinces into which the counties of Ireland are grouped. Among the notable facts that can be gleaned from the map is the ...
The British Isles
This 1842 map of the British Isles was published “under the superintendence” of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, an organization founded in London in 1826 for the purpose of improving the educational level of the British working and middle classes. The map was engraved by J. & C. Walker, a London firm of engravers, draftsmen, and publishers that flourished in the mid-19th century. It was published by Chapman and Hall, a London bookselling and publishing business established in 1830 by William Hall (1800–1847) and Edward Chapman (1804 ...
The Kingdom of Ireland, Divided as Much into the Main Regions of Ulster, Connacht, Leinster and Munster
This hand-colored map of Ireland was published in 1715 by the firm of Nuremberg engraver and publisher Johann Baptist Homann (1663–1724). It is based on earlier works by Nicolaes Visscher (1649-1702), of the second of three generations of Visschers who were art dealers and map publishers in Amsterdam, and Sir William Petty (1623–87), the pioneering English political economist who directed the nationwide cadastral survey of Ireland carried out under Oliver Cromwell in 1656–58. The map is in Latin, but place-names are in English and the original Celtic ...
The Province of Ulster Surveyed by Sir William Petty
This map of Ulster (present-day Northern Ireland), published in London in 1689, is based on the Down Survey of Ireland undertaken in 1656–58. As indicated in the subtitle, the map shows the counties and baronies of the province, archbishoprics, cities, roads and bridges, and the distribution of seats in parliament. Relief is shown pictorially. The map has two distance scales, Irish miles and English miles. The Down Survey was the first detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world. Its purpose was to measure lands which ...
History of the Sinn Fein Movement and the Irish Rebellion of 1916
Sinn Fein (Gaelic for “We Ourselves”) was founded to promote the cultural revival and political independence of Ireland. History of the Sinn Fein Movement and the Irish Rebellion of 1916 is a detailed history of the movement, written by Francis P. Jones, a former member of the movement who had immigrated to the United States from Ireland. The book covers the period from the founding of Sinn Fein in Dublin in 1905 to the Easter Rising of April 1916. It deals with the economic, cultural, religious, and political aspects of ...
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A German Illustration of "Freedom of the Seas" in War Time
Freedom of the seas was a highly contentious issue during World War I. Great Britain, which enjoyed maritime superiority over Germany, used its navy to block the shipment of military and industrial goods to Germany, including by way of ports in Denmark, Sweden, the Netherlands, and other neutral countries through which cargoes could be transshipped to Germany. Germany protested the British blockade and sought to position itself as a champion of freedom of the seas, in part to curry favor with the United States and other neutrals, who strongly objected ...
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Doing My Bit for Ireland
Margaret Skinnider (circa 1893‒1971) was born in Scotland to Irish parents. She trained as a teacher and taught mathematics in Glasgow, Scotland, before resigning her position to go to Dublin to take part in the Easter Rising of April 1916. Skinnider’s Doing My Bit for Ireland, published in the United States in 1917, is her account of her revolutionary activities in 1915 and 1916. She begins by telling the story of her first trip to Dublin, in 1915, when she smuggled detonators for bombs into Ireland for use ...
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A Large Proportion of Interior Ireland Consists of Bogs from Which Peat Is Dug
This photograph of a peat cutter and a woman at a bog in Ireland is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs ...
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All in One with the Irish Canadian Rangers 199th Overseas Battalion
In World War I, many Irish immigrants to Canada volunteered to serve in the Canadian armed forces. To assist with recruitment, the Canadian government established a purely Irish battalion, the Irish Canadian Rangers 199th Overseas Battalion. Based in Montreal, the unit began signing up volunteers in the winter of 1915–16. Also known as the Duchess of Connaught's Own Irish Rangers, after their royal patron, wife of Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Governor-General of Canada, the rangers sailed for Europe in December 1916 and made a triumphal tour ...
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For the Glory of Ireland
This World War I recruiting poster, published in Dublin in 1915, shows a woman holding a rifle. She gestures to a distant shore in flames labeled "Belgium," as she addresses a man with a walking stick. The caption reads: “Will you go or must I?” Appeals to manly pride, often voiced by women, were a common device used in posters aimed at encouraging men to enlist. The title, “For the Glory of Ireland,” appeals to national pride. Until 1922, when the southern counties seceded to form the Irish Free State ...
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Irish Canadians. Enlist in an Irish and Canadian Battalion. 199th Battalion C.E.F. Irish Canadian Rangers
This World War I recruiting poster from Canada shows two soldiers, one presumably Canadian, the other Irish, shaking hands, as one points to the motto, "Small nations must be free." The background features the maple leaf and shamrocks, symbols, respectively, of Canada and Ireland. The address of the recruiting office and the name of commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel H.J. Trihey, are given at the bottom of the poster. During the war, many Irish immigrants to Canada volunteered to serve in the Canadian armed forces. To assist with recruitment, the Canadian ...
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Irishmen - Avenge the Lusitania. Join an Irish Regiment To-Day
Until 1922, when the southern counties seceded to form the Irish Free State, Ireland was part of the United Kingdom. When World War I broke out, many Irish nationalists seeking independence for Ireland urged their compatriots to shun the British war effort. Some went so far as to conspire with German agents in various anti-British activities, but other Irishmen rallied to the British cause. Between 1914 and 1916, approximately 180,000 Irishmen volunteered to serve in the British armed forces. This poster, published in 1915 by the Central Council for ...
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