4 results in English
President Wilson's Policy
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. President Wilson’s Policy is Number 161 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. The book consists entirely of excerpts from statements made by Woodrow Wilson, president of the United States ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Subject Nationalities of the German Alliance. From the Allies’ Peace Terms as Stated in their Reply to President Wilson's Note of 19th December 1916
In December 1916, President Woodrow Wilson of the United States, as the leader of the world’s most important neutral power, put forward a plan to end World War I with a “peace without victory.” Wilson asked the Allied and Central powers to state their terms for peace. In their reply to Wilson’s note, the Allied powers declared: “The civilized world knows that the aims of the Allies include the reorganization of Europe, guaranteed by a stable settlement, based alike upon the principle of nationalities on the right which ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
When the First Ship Sails through the Panama Canal
The construction of the Panama Canal, its opening to traffic in early 1914, and the Panama Pacific International Exposition, held in San Francisco in 1915 to celebrate the completion of the canal, all inspired a wave of songwriting in the United States. The most notable of the compositions honoring the canal was “The Pathfinder of Panama,” written by the military march composer John Philip Sousa in 1915. This was also a time in which American popular sheet music publication was enjoying a golden age of sorts. Songs were published with ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Boundary Between Turkey and Armenia: As Determined by Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America
The disintegration of the Ottoman and Russian empires at the end of World War I gave birth to a number of new states. In May 1918, Eastern Armenia, formerly part of the Russian Empire, declared itself an independent republic. In April 1920, the victorious Allied Powers, dismantling the Ottoman Empire, directed that Western Armenia be attached to the new republic and appointed U.S. President Woodrow Wilson to arbitrate the boundary between Turkey (successor to the Ottoman Empire) and Armenia. In November 1920, Wilson set a boundary based on a ...
Contributed by Library of Congress