90 results in English
Antietam, Maryland. Allan Pinkerton, President Lincoln, and Major General John A. McClernand: Another View
At the outset of the U.S. Civil War, Mathew Brady dispatched a team of photographers to document the conflict. Among them was a Scottish-born immigrant named Alexander Gardner, the photographer who took this photo of Lincoln at Antietam as well as other famous wartime shots. The man to Lincoln's right is Allan Pinkerton, founder of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency, whom Lincoln had as head of a personal security detail during the war. Gardner titled another shot of Pinkerton and his brother William at Antietam “The Secret Service ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Interview with Fountain Hughes, Baltimore, Maryland, June 11, 1949
Approximately 4 million slaves were freed at the conclusion of the American Civil War. The stories of a few thousand have been passed on to future generations through word of mouth, diaries, letters, records, or written transcripts of interviews. Only 26 audio-recorded interviews of ex-slaves have been found, 23 of which are in the collections of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. In this interview, 101-year-old Fountain Hughes recalls his boyhood as a slave, the Civil War, and life in the United States as an African American ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Unidentified African American Soldier in Union Uniform with Wife and Two Daughters
In May 1863, U.S. Secretary of War Edwin Stanton issued General Order Number 143 creating the Bureau of U. S. Colored Troops. This photograph shows an unidentified African American soldier in a Union uniform, with his wife in dress and hat, and two daughters wearing matching coats and hats. The image was found in Cecil County, Maryland, making it likely that this soldier belonged to one of the seven United States Colored Troop regiments raised in Maryland. The photograph is from the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Unidentified Girl in Mourning Dress Holding Framed Photograph of Her Father
This photograph shows a girl holding a framed image of her father. Judging from her necklace, mourning ribbons, and dress, it is likely that her father was killed in the war. The man in the portrait is recognizable as a Union cavalryman with a sword, wearing a Hardee hat (the regulation hat for enlisted men). The photograph is from the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs at the Library of Congress. The collection includes more than 1,000 special portrait photographs, called ambrotypes and tintypes, representing both Union and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Private Henry Augustus Moore of Company F, 15th Mississippi Infantry Regiment
This photograph shows a Confederate soldier during the American Civil War (1861−65). He is identified as Private Henry Augustus Moore of Company F, 15th Mississippi Infantry Regiment. Moore is wearing a grey coat with short, one-inch wide bars across the chest, a uniform based in part on regulations prescribed by the state of Mississippi. He holds a short artillery sword and a sign that reads “Jeff Davis and the South!” Jefferson Davis was a former senator from Mississippi who was inaugurated president of the Confederate States of America on ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Major General Franz Sigel
The German-American Franz Sigel (1824–1902) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in Sinsheim, Grand Duchy of Baden, he graduated from the Karlsruhe military academy in 1843. Sigel served as colonel and later secretary of war of the Baden revolutionary army during the revolutions of 1848 and 1849. He immigrated to New York City in 1852, where, along with his father-in-law, he founded the German-American Institute. He was favored by President Abraham Lincoln for his ability to garner German-American support for the Union, and in May ...
Brigadier General Henry Washington Benham
Henry Washington Benham (1813–84) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in Connecticut, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1837. Benham served in the Army Corps of Engineers developing fortifications along the Eastern seaboard and was wounded in the Mexican War (1846–48). During the Civil War, he led the troops which defeated Confederate General Robert S. Garnett at Corrick’s Ford, resulting in the death of the first general officer of the war and his own promotion to brigadier ...
Brigadier General George Washington Cullum
George Washington Cullum (1809–92) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in New York City, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1833 and served in the Army Corps of Engineers developing fortifications along the New England coast and in the Mexican War (1846–48). Prior to the outbreak of the Civil War, he was promoted to lieutenant colonel and aide-de-camp to Commanding General of the Army Winfield Scott. In 1861 he became a member of the U.S. Sanitation Commission ...
Brigadier General Abram Duryée
Abram Duryée (1815–90) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in New York City, he graduated from Columbia University and was a wealthy mahogany importer. He rose rapidly in the New York State Militia to reach the rank of colonel in 1859. Unlike many generals from both the North and the South, he did not see action in the Mexican War. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Duryée recruited a regiment, known as Duryée’s Zouaves, or the Fifth New York, which he led during ...
Brigadier General Joseph Hooker
Joseph Hooker (1814‒79) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in Hadley, Massachusetts, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point and served in the Mexican War (1846‒48). During the Civil War, he commanded a division in the Peninsular Campaign of 1862 and as a corps commander led the initial Union attacks at the Battle of Antietam. In January 1863 he replaced Ambrose Everett Burnside as commander of the Army of the Potomac, but he was relieved of his command by President ...
Major General William Rosecrans
William Rosecrans (1819‒98) was a general on the Union side in the American Civil War. Born in Kingston, Ohio, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1842. After serving in the Engineer Corps and as assistant professor at West Point, he left the army in 1854 to take up a career in architecture and civil engineering. Upon the outbreak of the Civil War, he rejoined the army, commanded the Department of Western Virginia, and later commanded the Army of the Mississippi and the Army ...
Brigadier General Robert Anderson
Robert Anderson (1805–71) was a U.S. Army officer in the American Civil War who gained national fame as the major commanding the Union garrison at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina when the Civil War began. Born near Louisville, Kentucky, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1825. He fought in the Black Hawk (1832) and Second Seminole (1835–42) Wars. Anderson’s fluency in French and study of French artillery tactics enabled him to help develop highly mobile “flying artillery,” also ...
Brigadier General Joseph K. Mansfield
Joseph King Fenno Mansfield (1803–62) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in New Haven, Connecticut, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1822. Mansfield served in the Army Corps of Engineers planning fortifications along the southeast coast, such as Fort Pulaski, Georgia. He served with distinction as chief engineer under Colonel Zachary Taylor in the Mexican War (1846–48), which led to his promotion to inspector general of the army. With the outbreak of the Civil War in April 1861 ...
Captain David Farragut
David Farragut (1801‒70) was a Union naval officer in the American Civil War. He entered the U.S. Navy in 1810, at the age of nine, and fought against the British in the War of 1812 and later against pirates in the Caribbean. During the Civil War, he led the Union forces that captured New Orleans in April 1862, and worked closely with the army of General Ulysses S. Grant in the siege and capture of Vicksburg in July 1863. He was promoted to admiral in 1866 and remained ...
Commodore Theodorus Bailey
Theodorus Bailey (1805–77) was a Union naval officer in the American Civil War. He was born in Chateaugay, New York, and joined the navy as a midshipman at age 13. His early service included two circumnavigations of the globe by the age of 31. Bailey received his first command during the Mexican War (1846‒48). At the outbreak of the Civil War in April 1861, Captain Bailey was assigned a command in the Gulf Blockading Squadron. In April 1862, he was promoted to second-in-command of the West Gulf Coast ...
Commander Charles S. Boggs
Charles Stuart Boggs (1811–88) was a Union naval officer in the American Civil War. Born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, he served as lieutenant aboard the steamer USS Princeton in the Mexican War (1846–48), where he earned a reputation for remaining calm in time of danger. During the Civil War, he was assigned to command the USS Varuna in the fleet of Admiral David Farragut. In April 1862 he took part in the capture of New Orleans, which led to his promotion to captain and reassignment to command ...
Commodore Andrew Hull Foote
Andrew Hull Foote (1806–63) was a Union naval officer in the American Civil War. Born in New Haven, Connecticut, he attended the United States Military Academy at West Point but left in 1822 to serve in the United States Navy. Foote was a dedicated advocate of temperance and was a key figure in the elimination of the naval spirit ration. In February 1862, he led a successful attack on Fort Henry on the Tennessee River and was wounded in an attack several days later on Fort Donelson. Foote was ...
Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Du Pont
Samuel Francis Du Pont (1803–65) was a Union naval officer in the American Civil War. Born in Bergen Point (present-day Bayonne), New Jersey, he was a member of the prominent du Pont family. His paternal grandfather, Pierre Samuel du Pont de Nemours, was a French economist, diplomat, and advisor to Louis XVI. Du Pont started his naval career at the age of 12 as a midshipman on the USS Franklin. He served with distinction in the Mexican War (1846‒48) and was instrumental in taking San Diego. With the ...
Commander Charles Henry Davis
Charles Henry Davis (1807–77) was a scientist and Union naval officer in the American Civil War. Born in Boston, Massachusetts, he attended Harvard for two years and left to serve in the United States Navy. He was the first superintendent of the American Nautical Almanac Office, where he helped establish the American Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac,and a charter member of the National Academy of Sciences. During the Civil War, Davis was appointed commander of the Mississippi Flotilla. On June 6, 1862, he led the Union fleet to victory ...
Flag Officer Silas H. Stringham
Silas Horton Stringham (1798–1876) was a Union naval officer who served in the American Civil War. Born in Middletown, New York, he began his naval career at the age of 12 as a midshipman aboard the frigate President. He saw action in the War of 1812 and the Mexican War (1846‒48). Upon the outbreak of the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln appointed Stringham commander of the Atlantic Blockading Squadron, where, with General Benjamin Butler of the Union Army, he led a successful joint amphibious attack on Fort Clark ...
Commodore Hiram Paulding
Hiram Paulding (1797–1878) was a Union naval officer who served in the American Civil War. Born in Westchester County, New York, he began his naval career at the age of 13. Three years later, he was an acting lieutenant during the Battle of Lake Champlain in the War of 1812. After his promotion to captain in 1844, he went to Bremen, Germany,to advise the Frankfort Assembly on naval matters and was offered command of the future German navy, a post that he declined. Just before the outbreak of ...
Vice President Alexander H. Stephens, Confederate States of America
Alexander H. Stephens (1812‒83) was vice president of the Confederate States of America. Born on a small farm in the Georgia Piedmont, he studied law, was admitted to the bar, and soon was elected to the Georgia state assembly. In 1843 he was elected to the U.S. Congress as a member of the Whig Party. Unusually for a southern politician, he had reservations about the annexation of Texas and opposed the Mexican War and President James K. Polk’s vast program of territorial expansion, all of which he ...
William H. Seward
William H. Seward (1801‒72) was a prominent New York politician who served as secretary of state to Abraham Lincoln and emerged as Lincoln’s closest cabinet adviser. A graduate of Union College, he studied law and was admitted to the bar but soon entered politics, serving first in the New York state senate. A member of the Whig Party, he was elected to the U.S. Senate, in which he served 1849‒61. By the late 1850s, he was the most prominent figure in the newly formed Republican Party ...
Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles
Gideon Welles (1802‒78) was secretary of the navy in the cabinet of President Abraham Lincoln.  Born in Glastonbury, Connecticut, the son of a merchant and shipbuilder, Welles studied law but never practiced.  He worked as a journalist for the Hartford Times and Weekly Advertizer and in 1825 he was elected to the Connecticut General Assembly. A longtime Democrat, he broke with his party over the issue of slavery and helped to found the Hartford Evening Press to promote the Republican Party and its principles.  When Welles took office in ...
Young America
“Young America” is a print, copyrighted by Edward Anthony (1818‒88) in 1862, that was intended as a commentary on slavery, the major cause of the American Civil War (1861‒65) then raging. A counterpart print, “Young Africa: Or, The Bone of Contention”, also copyrighted by Anthony in 1862, shows an African-American child (presumably a slave) of similar age. Both prints were included in an album of mostly Civil War-era portraits by the famous American photographer Matthew Brady (circa 1823‒96) that belonged to Emperor Pedro II of Brazil (1825 ...
Young Africa: Or, The Bone of Contention
“Young Africa: Or, The Bone of Contention” is a print, copyrighted by Edward Anthony (1818‒88) in 1862, that was intended as a commentary on slavery, the major cause of the American Civil War (1861‒65) then raging. The print depicts a young African-American child, presumably a slave. A counterpart print, “Young America,” also copyrighted by Anthony in 1862, shows a white child of similar age. Both prints were included in an album of mostly Civil War-era portraits by the famous American photographer Matthew Brady (circa 1823‒96) that belonged ...
Major General Francis Preston Blair, Jr.
Francis Preston Blair, Junior (1821‒75) was a member of prominent political family with ties to the border states of Missouri and Maryland but which opposed slavery and stood with Lincoln during the Civil War. After serving two terms in the Missouri Senate, he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1856 as a Free Soil Democrat, an opponent of the expansion of slavery to the territories. He switched his affiliation to the Republican Party in 1860. During the secession crisis that followed Lincoln’s election, he ...
John Ericsson
John Ericsson (1803‒89) was an inventor and engineer whose innovations revolutionized naval warfare. In 1826 he emigrated from his native Sweden to Great Britain, where in 1836 he made significant improvements to the screw propeller. He moved to the United States in 1839. He designed the USS Princeton, the first steam-powered ship with engines and boilers entirely below the waterline. His most famous ship design was for the ironclad USS Monitor, which was completed in 1861 and fought the ironclad Merrimack (sunk April 1861, raised, reconstructed, and recommissioned as ...
Lieutenant General Winfield Scott
Winfield Scott (1786‒1866) was one of four generals during the American Civil War to hold the post of general in chief of the armies of the United States, the others being George McClellan, Henry Halleck, and Ulysses S. Grant. Scott was born in Virginia, graduated from William and Mary College, and then studied law and was admitted to the bar. He joined the army during the War of 1812, in which he was captured by the British, released in a prisoner exchange, and then severely wounded at the Battle ...
Major General George B. McClellan
George McClellan (1826‒85) was one of four generals during the American Civil War to hold the post of general in chief of the armies of the United States, the others being Winfield Scott, Henry Halleck, and Ulysses S. Grant. McClellan was born in Philadelphia, graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1846, and served in the engineer corps during the Mexican War (1846‒48). He left the army in 1857 to work in the railroad industry, but returned when the Civil War broke out. After ...
Major General Henry Halleck
Henry Halleck (1815−72) was born in Waterville, New York. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1839, and served in the Mexican War of 1846−48. He retired from the army in 1854 to practice law, but after the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861 he reentered the service with the rank of major general. He commanded the Department of the Missouri from November 19, 1861, to July 11, 1862, when he became general in chief of all the Union armies, a position ...
Major General Irvin McDowell
Irvin McDowell (1818−85) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in Columbus, Ohio, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1838 and fought in the Mexican War of 1846−48. Early in the Civil War he was a brigadier general at the head of the Department of Northeastern Virginia, and thus was in command of the Union army at the First Battle of Bull Run in July 1861. He held several other commands during the war, and was promoted to major ...
Major General John Adams Dix
John Adams Dix (1798–1879) was a U.S. senator and Union general in the American Civil War. Born in Boscawen, New Hampshire, he joined the army at the age of 15 to take part in the War of 1812. He fought in the battles at Chrysler’s Field in 1813 and Niagara, also known as Lundy’s Lane, in 1814. While still in the military, he studied law and was admitted to the District of Columbia bar. In 1828 Dix left the army to work in New York and ...
Major General Nathaniel P. Banks
Nathaniel Prentiss Banks (1816−94) was a lawyer who served as a member of Congress from 1853 to 1857 and was governor of Massachusetts from 1858 to 1861. When the Civil War broke out, he offered his services to the government and was made major general of volunteers. He commanded the Department of the Shenandoah in 1862 and the Department of the Gulf in 1863−64.  In the latter capacity, Banks led the Union forces at the siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana (May 22−July 9, 1863), which ended with ...
Major General John E. Wool
John Ellis Wool (1784–1869) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in Newburg, New York, he was first a bookseller and subsequently a lawyer in New York. Upon the outbreak of the War of 1812, he joined the army and served with distinction in that war and in the Mexican War (1846–48). Before the Civil War and in its early days, he commanded the Department of the East and, as commander of the Department of Virginia, secured control for the Union of Fort Monroe, Virginia ...
Major General David Hunter
David Hunter (1802–86) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in Washington, DC, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1822. Unlike many generals of his generation, he did not see action in the Mexican War (1846‒48). He was assigned a division at the onset of the Civil War in 1861. He was badly injured in the First Battle of Bull Run, also known as First Manassas, and reassigned to the Western Department in Missouri. In 1862, as commander of ...
Major General Benjamin Butler
Benjamin F. Butler (1818−93) was a Massachusetts politician and Union army general in the American Civil War. Appointed an officer largely for political reasons, he had a mixed record as a military commander. He earned an important place in history, however, for his actions during the war toward the people and territory of the South. In 1861, while serving as commander of Fort Monroe, Virginia, he made the decision, on his own authority, not to return to the Confederacy slaves fleeing into Union lines on the grounds that they ...
Governor William Sprague IV of Rhode Island
William Sprague IV (1830–1915) was a wealthy textile manufacturer and politician who served as governor of Rhode Island from 1860 to 1863 and as a U.S. senator from 1863 to 1875. Born in Cranston, Rhode Island, he attended Irving Institute in Tarrytown, New York, but was forced, after the murder of his father, to leave school early to tend to the family business. As governor he played a fundamental role in organizing troops for the Civil War. He accompanied a Rhode Island infantry regiment into action in the ...
Major General Ambrose Burnside
Ambrose Burnside (1824−81) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in Liberty, Indiana, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1847. Unlike many generals from both the North and the South, he did not see action in the Mexican War of 1846−48. He resigned his commission in 1853 to manufacture a breech-loading rifle that he had invented, and then worked in the railroad industry. With the outbreak of the Civil War he returned to the army, and commanded troops in ...
Brigadier General John Pope
John Pope (1822−92) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born in Louisville, Kentucky, he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1842 and served in the Mexican War of 1846−48 and in the Army engineering corps in connection with the development of the American West. When the Civil War broke out, he initially commanded troops in the western theater of the war, where he scored his most notable military achievement, the capture, on April 8, 1862, of Island Number Ten in ...
Brigadier General Louis Blenker
Louis Blenker (1812–63) was a Union general in the American Civil War. Born as Ludwig Blenker in Worms, Germany, he joined the Bavarian Legion in 1832, which fought for Prince Otto (subsequently King Otto I of Greece). He later fought with distinction in the German revolutions of 1848. He immigrated to the United States in 1849 and settled in Rockland County, New York, before moving to New York City. Upon the outbreak of the Civil War, he formed the Eighth New York Infantry, a regiment of German-American volunteers, and ...
Edward W. Stanly
Edward Stanly (1810–72) was a lawyer who served as a member of Congress from 1837 to 1843 and again from 1849 to 1853. He was born in New Bern, North Carolina, and graduated from the American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy (present-day Norwich University, Vermont) in 1829. During the Civil War, he was appointed brigadier general in the Union army and served as the Unionist military governor of eastern North Carolina. He found this to be an impossible position under wartime conditions and resigned in less than a year ...