15 results in English
Upper Senegal and Niger
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Upper Senegal and Niger is Number 107 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. Upper Senegal and Niger was a French colony, established in 1904 as part of the Government-General of ...
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Macao
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Macaois Number 81 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. Macau was at that time a colony of Portugal, leased by China to the Portuguese as a trading port. The ...
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British and German New Guinea
This 1906 map of British New Guinea, German New Guinea (also known as Kaiser-Wilhelms-land), and the Bismarck Archipelago was produced by the Geographical Section of the General Staff of the War Office of Great Britain. Germany annexed the northern area of the island of New Guinea in 1884, together with islands of New Britain and New Ireland. The Germans renamed the former New Pomerania and the latter New Mecklenburg. Also shown is Bougainville Island, which Germany annexed in 1889. When World War I broke out in 1914, German New Guinea ...
Chile, 1816
This hand-colored map of 1816 shows most of Chile, from its northern border to approximately 44° South. Relief is shown by hachures. An inset map depicts Isola de Tierra, the easternmost of the Juan Fernández Islands, the archipelago in the Pacific Ocean that appears at the far western edge of the map. The map has two distance scales, Spanish geographical miles and British statute miles. Yellow is used to highlight the borders of the Viceroyalty of La Plata, an administrative unit of the Spanish Empire established in 1776 out of ...
The Province of Tierra Firme and the New Kingdom of Granada and Popayán
This map of 1631 by Willem Janszoon Blaeu (1571–1638) shows Central America and the northwestern part of South America, including all or parts of Colombia, Ecuador, and Venezuela. A Dutch text on the reverse of the map explains the geography of the regions depicted, which encompassed the Spanish viceroyalty of New Granada and the province of Popayán, which took its name from the colonial city located at the foot of Volcán Puracé in the Cordillera Central of the Andes. The map shows rivers and other geographic features, along with ...
Comparative View of the Extent and Population of the Colonial Possessions of Great Britain and Other Powers
This map shows the extent of the British and the other European empires at the time it was published, in 1829. Different colors are used to indicate the colonial possessions of Great Britain, France, Spain, Portugal, the Netherlands, Denmark, and Sweden. A table at the bottom lists all of the possessions of these seven powers, their size in square miles, populations, and exports to and imports from their respective mother countries (in pounds sterling). Britain’s overall trade with its colonies was roughly in balance, but this was the result ...
The Course of the Mississippi River, According to the Most Modern Accounts
Le cours du fleuve Missisipi (The course of the Mississippi River) shows the extensive course and watershed of the Mississippi River as well as eastern parts of North America, according to the latest geographical information available in the mid-1730s. The map highlights broad stretches of eastern North America from Hudson Bay to the Gulf of Mexico, and from the mouth of the Saint Lawrence River to the Mississippi Delta. The map identifies New France, New England, and New Spain. It gives the names of lakes, rivers, and other points of ...
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An Accurate Map of North and South Carolina, with Their Indian Frontier
This hand-colored map of the Carolinas dating from 1775 is known as the “Mouzon map.” Henry Mouzon (circa 1741–circa 1807), mapmaker and civil engineer of Saint Stephen’s Parish, was appointed by Governor Lord Charles Greville Montague to survey South Carolina in 1771. Mouzon’s map is more detailed and accurate than any previous map of the Carolinas. Extending from the Atlantic Ocean westward to the Appalachian Mountains, the map was based on James Cook’s 1773 map of South Carolina and John Collet’s 1770 map of North ...
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Map of Louisiana and the Course of the Mississippi River, Based on a Large Number of Records, Including Those of Monsieur le Maire, by Guillaume de l'Isle, of the Royal Academy of Sciences
Carte de la Louisiane et du cours du Mississipi (Map of Louisiana and the course of the Mississippi River) was created in the early 18th century by the noted French cartographer Guillaume de L’Isle (1675–1726), famous for his relatively accurate maps of Europe, Africa, and North and South America. The map mostly shows the Louisiana Territory, centered on the course and watershed of the Mississippi River. It covers from the Great Lakes in the north to the Gulf of Mexico in the south and the Rocky Mountains to ...
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A Map of the British and French Dominions in North America with the Roads, Distances, Limits, and Extent of the Settlements
This landmark map of North America published in 1755 shows British sovereignty over large parts of the continent at the outset of the French and Indian War (1754–63). It is perhaps the most well-known 18th-century map of North America. Created by John Mitchell, a native Virginian who moved to London in his mid-thirties, the map was compiled using information provided by governors of the British colonies. Although territories of other European powers are shown, the map is biased toward British interests. French claims in the Mississippi and Ohio valleys ...
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North America, and the West Indies; A New Map, Wherein the British Empire and its Limits, According to the Definitive Treaty of Peace, in 1763, are Accurately Described, and the Dominions Possessed by the Spaniards, the French, and Other European States
Following the 1763 Treaty of Paris, which officially marked the end of the French and Indian War, the major European colonial powers divided North America. Article VII of the 1763 treaty, prominently displayed in the lower right corner of this map, established the boundary between French and British territory on the continent as “a line drawn along the middle of the River Mississippi.” The colonial boundaries shown on this map, as determined by the treaty, reflect the legally-recognized British possession of the territory east of the Mississippi River. Earlier maps ...
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The Anglo-Russian Rivalry in Nineteenth Century Asia: Persian Gulf, Frontiers of India
La rivalité anglo-russe au XIXe siècle en Asie: golfe Persique, frontières de l'Inde (The Anglo-Russian rivalry in 19th century Asia: Persian Gulf, frontiers of India) is a history of the competition between the British and Russian Empires over territories lying between their respective dominions in Asia. Russian expansion into Central Asia and British penetration east of Suez to the Indian subcontinent led the two powers into this diplomatic and military competition, which became known as the Great Game. The author, Alphonse Rouire (1855‒1917), was a French physician and ...
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Hijaz in the World War
Le Hedjaz dans la guerre mondiale (Hijaz in the World War) is an account by French general Édouard Brémond of the French army’s part in the defeat of Ottoman forces by British, Arab, and French allies. Brémond describes his role as chief of the French military and political mission in Hijaz, the aim of which was to defeat the Ottomans and place the sharif of Mecca, Husayn ibn ‘Ali (circa 1853‒1931), on the throne of the new Kingdom of Hijaz. Brémond was ordered to Arabia in 1916 at ...
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British Empire Throughout the World, Exhibited in One View
John Bartholomew and Co. was a mapmaking firm established in Edinburgh, Scotland, by John Bartholomew, Sr. (1805-61). His son, John Bartholomew, Jr. (1831-93), carried on the business. In the 1830s, the firm secured the commission to produce the maps in the Encyclopedia Britannica, which it held for the next 90 years. The business grew in the late 19th century as the British Empire expanded abroad and educational opportunity increased at home, driving up demand for maps. Among the cartographic innovations attributed to the firm were the use of red to ...
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Austria, Hungary, Foreign Policy of Austria-Hungary
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Austria, Hungary, Foreign Policy of Austria-Hungary is Number 1 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. The book is in three parts. The first is an overview of the political history ...
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