4 results in English
Map of Bolivia, Showing Forest and Agriculture Areas, and Mineral Localities
This 1912 map shows the agricultural, forest, and mineral wealth of Bolivia. Mineral production is shown as located mainly in the western part of the country, in or near the Andes Mountains. The locations of mines producing antimony, bismuth, copper, gold, lead, silver, wolfram, and tin, Bolivia’s most important mineral product, are indicated. Tin was mined in the departments of Cochabamba, La Paz, Oruro, and Potosí. Production boomed in the late-19th century–early 20th century, as the extension of the rail line to Oruro made possible the export of ...
Belgian Congo
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Belgian Congo is Number 99 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. The Belgian Congo (present-day Democratic Republic of the Congo, called Zaire 1971−97) was an enormous colony in southern ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Goodyears Rubber-Packing and Belting Company
This circa 1856 advertising print shows the five-story offices and storefront known as the Girard Building (102-104, i.e., 306-308 Chestnut Street), in Philadelphia. The building was tenanted by Goodyears, i.e., the Philadelphia warehouse of the New York Belting and Packing Company (104); and "Peterson's Book Establishment," i.e., the store of bookseller T.B. Peterson & Brothers, and C. J. Peterson, publisher of Peterson’s Ladies National Magazine (102). Lettering reading "Goodyears Rubber Packing & Belting Company" adorns the roof. Through open entryways and large display windows, clerks, patrons, and merchandise displays are visible in both stores. At Peterson's, clerks assist patrons with items from ...
Planting in Uganda. Coffee—Para Rubber—Cocoa
Planting in Uganda. Coffee—Para Rubber—Cocoais a comprehensive analysis of plantation agriculture in early 20th-century Uganda, written by two senior managers of Ugandan companies. As stated in the preface, it was intended to assist white planters who were attracted to Uganda by the fertile soils and favorable climate but who, in many cases, had no knowledge of agricultural conditions in the country. It deals with three main products—coffee, Para rubber (today usually simply referred to as rubber), and cocoa—and focuses on two provinces, Buganda and Bugosa ...