7 results in English
Results of the Revolutionary Movement in Russia during a Period of 40 Years (1862-1902)
This book, published in Geneva in 1903, is number 24 in a series of 43 titles produced in 1902−4 by the social democratic organization Zhizn’ (Life) as “The Library of the Russian Proletariat.” The book is a compilation of documents, including programs, manifestoes, and articles, related to the Russian revolutionary movement in 1862−1902. Among the documents in the book are the declaration Molodaia Rossiia (Young Russia) published in 1862; articles from Zemlia i Volia (Land and liberty), the organ of the Narodnik (Populist) society that was published in ...
Essays on the History of the Civil War of 1917-1920
Essays on the History of the Civil War of 1917-1920 is an early history of the civil war that followed the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. The book was written by Anatolii Anishev, a researcher at the Tolmachev Military-Political Academy in Leningrad (present-day Saint Petersburg), and published in Leningrad in 1925. In his introduction, Anishev notes that archival sources relating to the war were in poor condition and that almost no monographs existed. This forced him to rely on articles in White Russian magazines and newspapers, which were biased and unreliable ...
Biography of Zou Rong
Zou Rong (1885−1905), whose original name was Zou Shaotao, was also called Guiwen and had the style name Weidan. He was a native of Baxian, Sichuan. He changed his name to Zou Rong while studying in Japan. In 1903 he published a little book entitled Ge ming jun (The revolutionary army), calling for the Chinese people to carry out revolution, overthrow the Manchu regime, and establish the Chinese republic. Zhang Taiyan (1868−1936), a Chinese philologist, philosopher, and also a revolutionary, wrote the preface. It was published in the ...
Contributed by National Library of China
The Insurrection in Dublin
The Easter Rising of April 1916 was an attempt by Irish nationalists to provoke a nationwide rebellion and thereby secure Ireland’s independence from British rule. In fighting that was largely confined to Dublin, 60 insurgents and 130 troops and police were killed, along with 300 civilians caught in the crossfire. In the aftermath of the uprising the British executed another 15 conspirators, including Sir Roger Casement, a Protestant who had become an ardent Irish nationalist and who had sought to acquire weapons for the insurgents from Germany, Britain’s ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
History of the Sinn Fein Movement and the Irish Rebellion of 1916
Sinn Fein (Gaelic for “We Ourselves”) was founded to promote the cultural revival and political independence of Ireland. History of the Sinn Fein Movement and the Irish Rebellion of 1916 is a detailed history of the movement, written by Francis P. Jones, a former member of the movement who had immigrated to the United States from Ireland. The book covers the period from the founding of Sinn Fein in Dublin in 1905 to the Easter Rising of April 1916. It deals with the economic, cultural, religious, and political aspects of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Doing My Bit for Ireland
Margaret Skinnider (circa 1893‒1971) was born in Scotland to Irish parents. She trained as a teacher and taught mathematics in Glasgow, Scotland, before resigning her position to go to Dublin to take part in the Easter Rising of April 1916. Skinnider’s Doing My Bit for Ireland, published in the United States in 1917, is her account of her revolutionary activities in 1915 and 1916. She begins by telling the story of her first trip to Dublin, in 1915, when she smuggled detonators for bombs into Ireland for use ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Aguinaldo's Navy
The Spanish-American War of 1898, in which the United States wrested Cuba, the Philippines, Guam, and Puerto Rico from Spain, was one of the first wars to be captured by the motion picture camera. Fighting in the Philippines between Spanish and U.S. forces ended in August 1898. On January 1, 1899, a constitutional convention declared the establishment of a new Philippine Republic, with Emilio Aguinaldo, the leader of Philippine resistance to Spanish rule, as president. The United States refused to recognize the new government, and in February 1900 fighting ...
Contributed by Library of Congress