11 results in English
South Korea, Prince Min Yong Ik and Diplomats
This image, showing a group of Korean and American diplomats (including Prince Min Yong Ik, minister plenipotentiary), is one of 43 photographs of Korea taken by George Clayton Foulk between 1883 and 1886 and held at the American Geographical Society Library at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Foulk’s note on the image reads: “Special mission from Korea to U.S.A., 1883. Prince Min Yong Ik, minister plenipotentiary. From left to right, bottom row: Hong Yong Sik (vice minister), Prince Min Yong Ik (minister plenipotentiary), Soh Kong Pom (secretary to ...
South Korea, Prince Min Yong Ik, Korean Officials and American Naval Officers
This image, showing a group of Korean and American officials (including Prince Min Yong Ik, minister plenipotentiary), is one of 43 photographs of Korea taken by George Clayton Foulk between 1883 and 1886 and held at the American Geographical Society Library at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Foulk’s note on the image identifies the men from left to right, and reads: “Number 3 is Lieutenant T.W.B. Mason, U.S. Navy; number 1 is Prince Min Yong Ik (minister plenipotentiary); number 4 is Percival Lowell (escort from Japan to ...
François d'Orléans, Prince of Joinville
François-Ferdinand-Philippe-Louis-Marie d'Orléans, prince de Joinville (1818–1900), was a French naval officer, writer, and artist. He was born in Neuilly-sur-Seine, the third son of Louis-Philippe, duc d’Orléans, later king of France from 1830 to 1848. The prince de Joinville served with distinction in the Battle of Veracruz (1838), which resulted in the French capture of the city and most of the Mexican navy. He commanded the expedition of the retour des cendres (return of the ashes) that returned the body of Napoleon to France from Saint Helena (1840 ...
Prince Pierre d'Orléans, Duke of Penthièvre
Pierre Philippe Jean Marie d'Orléans, duc de Penthièvre (1845–1919), was the grandchild of Louis-Philippe, duc d’Orléans and king of the French from 1830 to 1848. In 1861, he traveled to New York with his father, the prince de Joinville, and two of his cousins, Prince Robert d’Orléans, duc de Chartres, and Prince Philippe d’Orléans, comte de Paris, to offer support to President Abraham Lincoln in the American Civil War. The duc de Penthièvre attended the United States Naval Academy and received an honorary appointment as ...
Prince Jérôme-Napoléon
Napoléon-Joseph-Charles-Paul Bonaparte (1822‒91) was the son of Jérôme Bonaparte, the youngest brother of Napoléon I, and thus a nephew of the emperor. He participated in French politics both as an elected official in the republican order and as a member of a family with claims to the French throne. He was elected to the National Assembly in 1848, and in 1851 he was named as the successor to Napoléon III. After the fall of the empire he left France for England, but he returned in 1872 and sat in ...
Prince Philippe d'Orléans, Count of Paris
Louis-Philippe-Albert d'Orléans, comte de Paris (1838–94) was a Union army officer in the American Civil War. He was the grandchild of Louis-Philippe, duc d’Orléans and king of the French from 1830 to 1848. Prince Philippe was pretender to the throne after the deaths of his grandfather and father, but after the fall of the monarchy in 1848 he left France for England. During the Civil War, he traveled with his brother, Prince Robert, and uncle, Prince François d'Orléans, to the United States to offer support to ...
Prince Robert d'Orléans, Duke of Chartres
Robert-Philippe-Louis-Eugène-Ferdinand d'Orléans, duc de Chartres (1840–1910) was a French army officer and grandchild of Louis-Philippe, duc d’Orléans and king of the French from 1830 to 1848, who served as a Union army officer in the American Civil War. Born in Paris, he left France for Turin after the fall of the monarchy in 1848, where he received military training and was commissioned with the 21st Dragoons, a Piedmontese regiment. During the Civil War, he traveled with his brother, Prince Philippe, and uncle, Prince François d'Orléans, to ...
The Tale of Genji
This book is an old movable-type edition of one of the best-known classic works of Japanese literature. It is said to be the first printed version of Genji monogatari (The tale of Genji) and appears in 54 volumes produced in the Keichō Era (1596–1615). This is one of the earliest books for which hiragana types were used, and only two others are extant as scribal copies. Hiragana is a cursive script of the Japanese syllabary. One of the oldest novels in the world, Genji monogatari was written in the ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
The Interesting History of Prince Lee Boo, Brought to England from the Pelew Islands
The Interesting History of Prince Lee Boo, Brought to England from the Pelew Islands, is an abridged version of a longer work by George Keate (1729-97), An Account of the Pelew Islands, Situated in the Western Part of the Pacific Ocean. Composed from the Journals and Communications of Captain Henry Wilson, and some of his Officers, who, in August 1783, were there Shipwrecked, in the Antelope, a Packet belonging to the Hon. East India Company, published in 1788. The book tells the story of Captain Henry Wilson’s shipwreck on ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Tale of Genji: Volumes 1-54
Genji monogatari (Tale of Genji) is often considered the first great novel in world literature. The author of the work, Murasaki Shibuku, was born around 978 and spent most of her life at or near the imperial court in Kyoto. After a brief marriage to an older man, she entered the service of Empress Akiko (or Shōshi) around 1005 as a lady-in-waiting. The novel consists of 54 books or chapters that recount the life and romances of Prince Genji, the young, handsome, and talented son of an emperor. The novel ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Small Mirror of Genji
Genji Monogatari (The tale of Genji) is widely regarded as the pinnacle of classical Japanese literature. It tells the story of Hikaru Genji, son of the Japanese emperor who, for political reasons, is relegated to commoner status and has to start a career as an imperial official. The text covers his entire life, concentrating especially on his private life as a courtier, including his numerous love affairs. The tale was written around the year 1000 at the imperial court of Heian-kyo (Kyoto) by a lady-in-waiting at the court whose real ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library