22 results in English
Outline Map of Japan
This picture map of Japan was published at the end of the 17th century. The cartographer, Ishikawa Tomonobu (also known as Ryūsen and Ryūshū, date of birth and death unknown) was an ukiyo-e artist and mapmaker. He is said to have been a student of Hishikawa Moronobu (1618–94), often considered the first ukiyo-e artist. It is the first map of Japan by Ryūsen with an imprint of his name. Said to be based on an original commissioned by the shogunate government, it was distorted and enlarged on the woodblock-printed ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Armorial of Cornelis van Aeken, or Beyeren Armorial
The Beyeren Armorial, also known as the Armorial of Cornelis van Aeken, was compiled by Claes Heynenzoon (also known as the Gelre Herald, circa 1345−1414), who was Ruwieren King of Arms, the chief herald of the Netherlands, around 1400.  Heraldry had steadily increased in importance throughout the Middle Ages. In tournaments and on the battlefield, knights were unrecognizable once they donned their helmet and armor, unless they used a coat of arms as an identifying symbol. The coats of arms also were used to indicate the noble lord to ...
The Armorial of Conrad von Grünenberg
The Armorial of Conrad von Grünenberg is a splendid manuscript containing several hundred colored coats of arms. It was written on parchment and seems to be a contemporary copy from the original version on paper written in 1483, preserved today in Berlin. It formed part of the library of the dukes of Bavaria and was probably in the possession of Duke Wilhelm IV of Bavaria (1493−1550). Depicted are the coats of arms of barons, dukes, margraves, archbishops, free cities and towns, and orders of knights from throughout Germany, as ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library
Description of Ukraine, or Regions of the Kingdom of Poland between Muscovy and Transylvania
Presented here is an early translation into Russian of Description d'Ukranie, an influential work first published in French in 1651. The author, Guillaume Le Vasseur de Beauplan, was a French engineer who worked in Poland between 1630 and 1647. He built fortifications in Ukraine, most of which was then under Polish control, took part in battles with the Cossacks and Tatars, and in 1639 traveled by boat down the Dnieper River. Beauplan produced two important early maps of Ukraine that were based on his own observations and his own ...
The Princess of Montpensier
This first edition of La Princesse de Montpensier (The Princess of Montpensier)by Madame de La Fayette was published anonymously in 1662. Taking place during the religious wars of the previous century, it is the story of the entangled loves of the princess, her husband the prince, the duke of Guise whom she had loved before her arranged marriage, and his friend, the count of Chabannes. The count, in love with the princess who does not care for him, sacrifices his honor to save that of his lady, before being ...
Recipients of the Cross of Saint George, Awarded with the Highest Military Honor. For Action on Kulikelansk Hill June 25, 1870: Junkers Iurkevich and Bychkov of the 1st Turkestan Artillery Brigade
This photograph is from the historical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The compiler of the first three parts was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Theater of Nobility in Europe. Genealogy of the Illustrious Progenitors of the Christian World
Theatrum, Nobilitatis. Europeae, Tabulis. Progonologicis. Praecipuorum. In. Cultiori. Christiano. Orbe. Magnatum. Et. Illustrium. Progenitores (The theater of nobility in Europe. Genealogy of the illustrious progenitors of the Christian world) is a work on the family trees of royal and noble families of Europe by the German Lutheran theologian Philipp Jakob Spener (1635‒1705). Spener was one of the founders of Pietism and is considered the father of modern heraldry and genealogy studies. He worked as a preacher in Strasbourg, Frankfurt, and Dresden, before becoming consistorial counselor in Berlin. Theatrum, Nobilitatis ...
Contributed by Slovak National Library
Seven Centuries of Monarchy and the Holy Crown of Hungary
De Monarchia Et Sacra Corona Regni Hungariae Centuriae Septem (Seven centuries of monarchy and the Holy Crown of Hungary) is a history of Hungary for 700 years up to the time when the book was written in the mid-17th century. The author, Peter Révai (also seen as Révay, 1568‒1622), was a historian and government official. He was the hereditary district administrator of Turiec District from 1598 and from 1608 was the guardian of the royal crown; he also served as royal adviser and was a judge of the royal ...
Contributed by Slovak National Library
The Story of the Chevalier des Grieux and of Manon Lescaut
Histoire du chevalier des Grieux et de Manon Lescaut (Story of the Chevalier des Grieux and of Manon Lescaut), more commonly known as Manon Lescaut, is a novel by the Abbé Prévost (1697‒1763), first published in Paris in 1731. Considered scandalous at the time, it was immediately banned. The novel tells the story of Chevalier des Grieux and his lover, the amoral courtesan Manon Lescaut. Des Grieux is from a noble family, but he forfeits his inheritance when he displeases his father and runs away with Manon. The two ...
The Photographic Album
The Photographic Album is an album of portraits by the famous American photographer Matthew Brady (circa 1823‒96) that belonged to Emperor Pedro II of Brazil (1825‒91), a collector of photography as well as a photographer himself. The album was a gift to the emperor from Edward Anthony (1818‒88), another early American photographer who, in partnership with his brother, owned a company that in the 1850s became the leading seller of photographic supplies in the United States. Dom Pedro may have acquired the album during a trip to ...
"Hortus Regius" or Queen Christina’s Genealogical Tree with Political Emblems
Hortus Regius (The royal garden) was given to the Swedish queen Christina about 1645 by its creator, the diplomat Shering Rosenhane (1609‒63). With this elegant manuscript, Rosenhane wanted to celebrate the first year of the queen’s reign. The volume is introduced by a full-length portrait of Queen Christina. Hortus Regius is an emblem book, in which each emblem consists of textual and pictorial elements. Elements from classical, medieval, and contemporary literature of a sententious character useful to a queen are combined with illustrations by the Dutch painter Pieter ...
Princess Maria Clotilde of Savoy
Maria Clotilde of Savoy (1843–1911) was the wife of Napoléon-Joseph-Charles-Paul Bonaparte (1822–91), nephew of French emperor Napoléon I. Born in Turin, she was the first child of Victor Emmanuel II, King of Sardinia, and Adelaide of Austria. Prince Napoléon participated in French politics both as an elected official in the republican order and as a member of a family with claims to the French throne. Maria Clotilde was a pious and modest woman who often disapproved of her husband’s excesses. The couple had two sons, Victor-Napoléon-Jérôme-Frédéric (1862 ...
François d'Orléans, Prince of Joinville
François-Ferdinand-Philippe-Louis-Marie d'Orléans, prince de Joinville (1818–1900), was a French naval officer, writer, and artist. He was born in Neuilly-sur-Seine, the third son of Louis-Philippe, duc d’Orléans, later king of France from 1830 to 1848. The prince de Joinville served with distinction in the Battle of Veracruz (1838), which resulted in the French capture of the city and most of the Mexican navy. He commanded the expedition of the retour des cendres (return of the ashes) that returned the body of Napoleon to France from Saint Helena (1840 ...
Prince Pierre d'Orléans, Duke of Penthièvre
Pierre Philippe Jean Marie d'Orléans, duc de Penthièvre (1845–1919), was the grandchild of Louis-Philippe, duc d’Orléans and king of the French from 1830 to 1848. In 1861, he traveled to New York with his father, the prince de Joinville, and two of his cousins, Prince Robert d’Orléans, duc de Chartres, and Prince Philippe d’Orléans, comte de Paris, to offer support to President Abraham Lincoln in the American Civil War. The duc de Penthièvre attended the United States Naval Academy and received an honorary appointment as ...
Prince Jérôme-Napoléon
Napoléon-Joseph-Charles-Paul Bonaparte (1822‒91) was the son of Jérôme Bonaparte, the youngest brother of Napoléon I, and thus a nephew of the emperor. He participated in French politics both as an elected official in the republican order and as a member of a family with claims to the French throne. He was elected to the National Assembly in 1848, and in 1851 he was named as the successor to Napoléon III. After the fall of the empire he left France for England, but he returned in 1872 and sat in ...
Prince Philippe d'Orléans, Count of Paris
Louis-Philippe-Albert d'Orléans, comte de Paris (1838–94) was a Union army officer in the American Civil War. He was the grandchild of Louis-Philippe, duc d’Orléans and king of the French from 1830 to 1848. Prince Philippe was pretender to the throne after the deaths of his grandfather and father, but after the fall of the monarchy in 1848 he left France for England. During the Civil War, he traveled with his brother, Prince Robert, and uncle, Prince François d'Orléans, to the United States to offer support to ...
Prince Robert d'Orléans, Duke of Chartres
Robert-Philippe-Louis-Eugène-Ferdinand d'Orléans, duc de Chartres (1840–1910) was a French army officer and grandchild of Louis-Philippe, duc d’Orléans and king of the French from 1830 to 1848, who served as a Union army officer in the American Civil War. Born in Paris, he left France for Turin after the fall of the monarchy in 1848, where he received military training and was commissioned with the 21st Dragoons, a Piedmontese regiment. During the Civil War, he traveled with his brother, Prince Philippe, and uncle, Prince François d'Orléans, to ...
Heian Period Tale of the Nightingale in the Plum Tree
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. This print by Kitao Shigemasa (1739–1820) illustrates an 11th-century tale ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Letter Confirming Nobility
This manuscript from Mexico City is the record of testimony offered by Sebastián Vizcaíno (1550?-1615) in 1597-1600 to prove the noble status of his wife, Magdalena Martínez Orejón, and her brother, Francisco Martínez Orejón. Vizcaíno was a prominent Mexico City merchant and an explorer of Baja California. The proofs of nobility were important to defend Vizcaíno's brother-in-law, Francisco Martínez Orejón, in a lawsuit that put him in debtor's prison. The text is written in an italic style in black ink within ruled frames, on both sides of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
English Coats of Arms
In the mid-16th century, tradesmen working for the Fugger mercantile and banking empire and commissioned by the Augsburg patrician and book lover Johann Jakob Fugger were busy acquiring new treasures, from sources near and far, for Fugger’s huge collection of books. To enlarge his collection of European dynastic history and heraldry, a special interest of Fugger’s in 1545–50, he procured this work, the latest version of the armorial of the English nobility. The collection opens with a magnificent coat of arms of King Henry VIII (reigned 1509 ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library
Ortenburg Armorial
This armorial was probably written and illuminated by different hands in Bavaria between 1466 and 1473. It contains heraldic devices of the Quaternions (Groups of Four, each representing different social groups of the Holy Roman Empire). It also illustrates the crests of (mostly) Bavarian princes, noblemen, territories, bishoprics, and prince-bishops. Despite its somewhat crude execution, it is a valuable resource for the heraldry of Southern Germany towards the end of the 15th century. By 1534 the manuscript had come into the possession of the counts of Ortenburg, near Passau; there ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library
Collection on the Genealogy of Bavarian Nobility, Volume 27
Johann Franz Eckher von Kapfing (1649–1727), prince-bishop of Freising from 1696 onwards, was keenly interested in history and genealogy. Having amassed material since his youth, he enlisted his Hofkammerdirektor (director of the court chamberlain’s office), Johann Michael Wilhelm von Prey zu Strasskirchen (1690–1747), to help him with his research. Some years after the death of Eckher, a clean copy was made of all the collected material; it was then arranged and bound into more than 30 bulky volumes. The collection, never printed, is the most extensive genealogical-historical ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library