18 results in English
National Exposition 1866: Throne Room
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. In 1866, Rio de Janeiro hosted the National Exposition, which took place in a palace that today houses the National Archives. The Exposition was visited by 52,824 persons ...
Nankou Manufacturing Works
This photograph shows the large-scale buildings of a manufacturing works in Nankou, situated along the tracks of the Jing-Zhang (or Beijing-Zhangjiakou) Railway. Behind the buildings are mountains. The photograph is from Jing-Zhang lu gong cuo ying (Photographs of the Jing-Zhang Railway construction), an album issued in 1909 to mark the opening of the Beijing-Zhangjiakou Railway (formerly known as the Imperial Peking-Kalgan Railway), the first railroad in China designed, built, and financed by the Chinese, without foreign involvement. The photographs in the album were taken between 1905 and 1909 by the ...
Contributed by National Library of China
Nankou Machinery Management Bureau
The title of this photograph indicates that this building houses the Nankou Machinery Management Bureau, located near the Jing-Zhang (or Beijing-Zhangjiakou) railroad line, but no signs are visible. The photograph is from Jing-Zhang lu gong cuo ying (Photographs of the Jing-Zhang Railway construction), an album issued in 1909 to mark the opening of the Beijing-Zhangjiakou Railway (formerly known as the Imperial Peking-Kalgan Railway), the first railroad in China designed, built, and financed by the Chinese, without foreign involvement. The photographs in the album were taken between 1905 and 1909 by ...
Contributed by National Library of China
Nankou Transport Machinery Company
The title of this photograph indicates that this building houses the Nankou Transport Machinery Company, located on the Jing-Zhang (or Beijing-Zhangjiakou) railroad line. Standing in front of the building is a group of workers. At the front and center of the image is a tall structure used for loading and unloading freight. The photograph is from Jing-Zhang lu gong cuo ying (Photographs of the Jing-Zhang Railway construction), an album issued in 1909 to mark the opening of the Beijing-Zhangjiakou Railway (formerly known as the Imperial Peking-Kalgan Railway), the first railroad ...
Contributed by National Library of China
Nankou General Railway Materials Works
This photograph shows the buildings of the Nankou General Railway Materials Works, situated at the foot of a mountain and near the Jing-Zhang (or Beijing-Zhangjiakou) railroad line. The sign on the door of the main building is illegible. On the right, workers stand in front of piles of packages. The photograph is from Jing-Zhang lu gong cuo ying (Photographs of the Jing-Zhang Railway construction), an album issued in 1909 to mark the opening of the Beijing-Zhangjiakou Railway (formerly known as the Imperial Peking-Kalgan Railway), the first railroad in China designed ...
Contributed by National Library of China
Are YOU in This?
This 1915 poster, published in London for the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee, shows soldiers and other citizens busy with war work, as a well-dressed man looks on pensively. The man is clearly being urged to enlist. Until March 2, 1916, when the Military Service Act introduced conscription, Great Britain’s World War I army was comprised entirely of volunteers, and many of the most famous wartime posters were recruitment appeals. The Parliamentary Recruiting Committee was set up following the outbreak of war in August 1914. A cross-party organization chaired by the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Loud and Brothers Piano Forte Manufacturers, Number 150, Chestnut Street, Philadelphia
This 1831 lithograph print shows the Loud & Brothers piano factory and shop, located at 150 Chestnut Street (above Sixth Street) in Philadelphia. Pianos can be seen through the window at the front of the shop. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes who was active in the city between about 1825 and 1855. Born in England circa 1773, Breton immigrated to Philadelphia around 1824. In the late 1820s, he contributed illustrations to Annals of Philadelphia, compiled by the antiquarian John F. Watson. In 1829 Breton entered the lithographic trade to execute the illustrations for the Annals. He worked extensively with the firm of Kennedy & Lucas, operated by David Kennedy and William B. Lucas, which produced Annals of Philadelphia. Breton also contributed to other publications at this time, including Mease and Porter's Picture of Philadelphia, also produced by Kennedy & Lucas, the first commercial lithographers in Philadelphia.
View of the Glass Works of T.W. Dyott at Kensington on the Delaware, near Philadelphia
This lithograph of 1831 depicts the glass works owned by T.W. Dyott at Kensington on the Delaware River near Philadelphia. Ships are visible on the river, and smoke is rising from the chimneys of these early industrial buildings. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an Account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes ...
Wetherill and Brothers White Lead Manufactory and Chemical Works, Corner of 12th and Cherry Streets, Philadelphia
This lithograph of 1831 depicts the Wetherill & Brothers White Lead Manufactory & Chemical Works, located at the corner of 12th and Cherry Streets in Philadelphia. Barrels, a horse-drawn cart, and a few workmen are seen in the courtyard of the U-shaped industrial complex, while dark smoke rises from several chimneys. White lead is a chemical compound made up of lead, carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen, historically used to make white paint. It was an important industrial product in 19th-century America, later banned for use in paint in the United States and most other countries as a cause of lead poisoning. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an account of its origin, increase and improvements in arts, sciences, manufactures, commerce and revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes who was active in the city between about 1825 and 1855. Born in England circa 1773, Breton immigrated to Philadelphia around 1824. In the late 1820s, he contributed illustrations to Annals of Philadelphia, compiled by the antiquarian John F. Watson. In 1829 Breton entered the lithographic trade to execute the illustrations for the Annals. He worked extensively with the firm of Kennedy & Lucas, operated by David Kennedy and William B. Lucas, which produced Annals of Philadelphia. Breton also contributed to other publications at this time, including Mease and Porter's Picture of Philadelphia, also produced by Kennedy & Lucas, the first commercial lithographers in Philadelphia.
William D. Rogers' Coach Manufactory. Sixth and Brown Streets, Philadelphia
This advertising print from 1847 shows a two-story factory on the 800 block of North Sixth Street near Spring Garden in Philadelphia. The building is adorned with signage reading: “Wm. D. Roger’s Coach Manufactory,” and “Rogers’ Coach Factory. 6th & Brown Sts.” A boy pulls a carriage out of one of the two entries to the building on Sixth Street as patrons inspect a different model of coach being pushed out the other door by a factory worker. A family walks between the coaches and other carriages are visible inside the building. Around the corner on Brown Street, two gentlemen converse on the sidewalk and a couple peers into a factory window. Near the rear of the factory, a hackney coach is displayed on top of a one-story addition. A laborer transports a sack on his back and passes near a strolling couple. In the street, a driver tries to reign in his speeding carriage, which is occupied by a couple, and is being chased by a barking dog. Nearby, a boy works on the wheel of a factory carriage. A pedestrian watches the scene from the corner. Hitching posts line the sidewalks, and a smaller factory with several smokestacks can be seen in the right background. William D. Rogers operated this factory at the site from 1846 to 1854. The lithograph was created by Alfred M. Hoffy, who was born circa 1790 in England and immigrated to the United States in the mid-1830s; the printer was Peter S. Duval, one of the most prominent lithographers and printers of his day.
Wakefield Manufacturing Company. Hosiery. Germantown, Philadelphia County
This lithograph from circa 1850 shows a pastoral view of the hillside area surrounding the mills of the Wakefield Manufacturing Company. The mills were established circa 1815 by William Logan Fisher, and were located at Eighteenth Street and Fisher's Lane in Philadelphia. In the foreground of this image, six children (one with a basket over his head) play on the hillside, while a man drives a horse-drawn cart loaded with boxes marked "hosiery" on the left. Mill buildings are visible in the distance, behind which more people can be ...
Robert Wood's Railing, Architectural and Ornamental Iron Works. Ridge Road below Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia
This circa 1851 advertising print shows a long three-story brick factory occupied by the iron works owned by Robert Wood and located at 1126 Ridge Avenue in Philadelphia. The central portion of the building looms a few feet over the wings, and is adorned by tall, narrow windows on the second story. The building is topped by a decorative cornice adorned with a statue, bell cupola, and advertising flag. Banners on the building advertise a range of iron goods: “Iron Railings, Verandas, &c.,” “Lions, Newfoundland Dogs, Grey Hounds, Statuary &c ...
Abbott and Lawrence Liberty Stove Works. Brown Street above Fourth Street, Philadelphia
This circa 1852 advertising print shows the Abbott & Lawrence Liberty Stove Works, founded in 1851 on the 400 block of Brown Street, west of Fourth Street, in the Northern Liberties neighborhood of Philadelphia. This view shows a four-story building containing the office and adorned with a cupola, a large work yard, and a foundry building in the rear. At the multi-story building, a laborer loads stoves that are lined on the sidewalk into a horse-drawn wagon under the eye of a man at the doorway. On the roof, two other men stand in the cupola that is adorned with a statue of Liberty. In the adjacent work yard, laborers shovel and pick at mounds of coal and bricks, and load and transport hand- and horse-drawn carts on the grounds and up a ramp leading to an opening in the foundry. Near the workers, a group of men convenes; one man leans on a shovel. Next to the multi-story building, two boys chase each other over a mound. On the sidewalk, pedestrians (including men, women, and children) stroll past a street lamp, watch the workers, and converse near a dog sniffing a fire hydrant. In the street, drivers guide horse-drawn carts, a drayman travels, a man rides on horseback, and two dogs can be seen in a greeting stance. A pedestrian crosses the path of an "Abbott & Lawrence Liberty Stove ...
H. B. McCalla, Successor to the Late Andrew McCalla. Number 252 Market Street. First Hat and Cap Store below 8th Street, South Side, Philadelphia
This circa 1852 chromolithograph is an advertising print showing the three-and-one-half story storefront located on the 700 block of Market Street in Philadelphia. The building is covered in advertising text, reading: "The Cheapest Wholesale & Retail Hat and Cap Manufactory in the World. Fashionable Styles. Caps. Hats." The attic window of the building also displays signage that reads, "Hat and Cap Store," and a large model hat and cap adorn the roof of the building. Boxes, hats, and milliners at work are visible in the upper windows. A male patron enters through one of the two open doorways to the establishment. Inside, a clerk surveys stacks of hats across from a flight of stairs. At the other end of the store, another clerk assists a patron, standing in front of a mirror, as he tries on hats next to shelves of merchandise. In a display window between the two entryways, hats and caps for men and boys are displayed, flanked by cases of hats and caps outside. In the street, a horse-drawn dray is positioned to receive a delivery opposite a laborer retrieving a crate labeled "M. Dormitzen Middleport Sch. County" from the store cellar. Labeled crates line the sidewalk with addressees that include: "Heitner & Shay Augusta Northumberland Co. Pa."; "T.L. Mitchell Jefferson Co. Pa."; "Young & Lee Allentown Pa."; "Geo. L. Reppler St. Clair Schuylkill Co."; and "Geo. Far... Centre Co. Pa." Partial views of adjacent businesses can be seen; one business displays blankets and a trunk near its entry and another contains signs reading: "Deposi...Roots...Every" and "Branch Americ..." H.B. McCalla took over ...
J.E. and B. Schell. City Marble Works and Steam Mantel Factory. Corner of Tenth and Vine Streets, Philadelphia
This advertisement from around 1854 shows a corner view of the three-building showroom and factory operated by the Schells at Tenth and Vine Streets in Philadelphia, from 1853 to 1856. J.E. Schell continued the business as J.E. Schell & Company starting in 1857. Patrons are seen entering the four-story storefront and mantel room adorned with signage reading, “J.E. & B. Schell” and “City Marble Works.” Statuary is displayed on a second-floor veranda. At the corner, a coach waits, and the disembarked African American driver stands at the ready. On ...
Dunlap's Phoenix Coach Works. Corner of Fifth and Buttonwood Streets, Philadelphia
This circa 1856 advertising print details the industrial complex for the "Phoenix Coach Works" located on the 400 block of Buttonwood Street in Philadelphia. The complex includes a four-story main building with street signs indicating the building is at the corner of Buttonwood and Fifth Streets; large signage at the top of the building reads: “Phoenix Coach Works” and “Dunlap’s Carriage Factory.” The main building is connected to additions and to the smaller "General Coach Furnishing Store." Several smokestacks and a tower decorated with the model of a carriage ...
Donnelly's Match Manufactory. Linden Street near the Stone Bridge, Philadelphia
This 1847 lithograph by an unknown artist advertises the steam patent match manufactory of John Donnelly, located south of Front Street near the Delaware River, in Philadelphia. Signage covers the three-story building, reading: “Donnelly’s Steam Patent Match Manufactory,” and “Linden Street Near the Stone Bridge.” White lettering on the roof reads, “Kensington Match Manufactory.” A small sign for “Donnelly’s Match Manufactory” hangs near the top of the short side of the building. Male and female workers are visible at many of the windows lining the building. Workers also ...
Burton and Laning's Paper Hangings Manufactory. 6th Street above Camac
This advertisement from around 1855 shows a paper hangings factory that was established by the firm of Burton & Laning in 1852, and located at Sixth Street and Columbia Avenue in Philadelphia. A worker hoists a barrel up the street-side of the four-and-one-half story building, which is located in an industrial block. Sheds, fenced factory yards, and factory buildings dominate the surrounding landscape. In the foreground is a busy street scene. A horse-drawn dray is unloaded in front of the factory and a hay wagon pulled by two horses approaches from ...