21 results in English
Akogi
Noh is a classical Japanese performance art that developed into its present form during the 14th and 15th centuries under the patronage of the shogunate. It became one of the favorite pastimes of the ruling class in Japan. Noh drama consists of dance and music. An utai-bon (book of lyrics) was made for each song in the drama. Noh was most popular during the 17th century, so many utai-bon, or Noh libretti, were published at that time. Shown here is a part of an utai-bon of Kanze-ryū style, one of ...
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The Tales of Ise
Ise monogatari (The tales of Ise) is a collection of some 125 brief episodes, combining elements of prose and poetry, that dates from the early Heian period (9th−10th centuries). The protagonist is believed to be modeled on Ariwarano Narihira (825−80), a handsome aristocrat who had many romantic affairs. The main character’s romances, friendships, heartbroken wandering life, and various other stories are narrated in a style that owes much to waka (literally, Japanese poems). The work had a great influence on later Japanese literature, including Genji monogatari (The ...
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The Insect Book
Ehon mushi-erami (The insect book) is by the ukiyo-e painter Kitagawa Utamaro (circa 1753−1806). It was created by him before he produced the bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women) for which he is famous. Each double page of the book contains a painted illustration of a plant and two species of insects, along with two kyōka (a poem style originating from waka, literally, Japanese poems). The kyōka are ostensibly insect-themed love poems. In all, 15 colored wood-block prints are included. The work demonstrates Utamaro’s skill at drawing, as well ...
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Beauties of Yoshiwara
Seirō Bijin Awase (Beauties of Yoshiwara) is one of the finest multicolored woodblock printed books in Japan. It was published in 1770. The book depicts 166 courtesans of the Yoshiwara, the pleasure quarter in Edo (present-day Tokyo), with the names of the courtesans and the brothels where they worked, with a haiku (a short poem) in the background of each illustration. The work consists of five sections in five chapters. The original title slip on which the book title and the volume title were printed is attached to the center ...
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Gratitude to a Father
This two-volume work is a memorial collection of haiku (a short poem) published by the Edo period Kabuki actor Ichikawa Danjūrō II (1688−1758) on the 27th anniversary of the death of his father, Ichikawa Danjūrō I (1660−1704). Entitled Chichi no on (Gratitude to a father), the poems are imbued with the determination of the son never to forget his filial piety for his father, who died when the son was still a boy. Of the 70 illustrations, 66 are monochrome prints drawn by Hanabusa Ippō (1691−1760) who ...
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The Moon-Mad Monk, or Crazy Gazing at the Moon
Shown here is an illustrated anthology, in color, published in 1789 by Tsutaya Jūzaburō (1750−1797), a publisher of the Edo period (1600−1868). It contains 72 kyōka (humorous and satirical Japanese poems of 31 syllables) written about the moon and five pictures painted by the ukiyo-e artist Kitagawa Utamaro (circa 1753–1806). The title Kyōgetsubō (The moon-mad monk, or crazy gazing at the moon) means a man driven mad by the moon, but it is said to be a reference to the poet Gyōgetsubō (Reizei Tamemori 1265−1328), who ...
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One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: I Wish I Had Gone to Bed Immediately/ But Now the Night Has Passed/ And I Watch the Moon Descend - Akazome Emon
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
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One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: Frost Fills the Camp and the Autumn Air is Still/ Lines of Returning Geese Cross the Moon of the Third Hour - Kenshin
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
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One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: I Listen to the Sound of the Cloth Being Pounded/ As the Moon Shines Serenely/ And Believe that There is Someone Else/ Who Has Not Yet Gone to Sleep - Tsunenobu
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
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One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: The Moon And The Abandoned Old Woman
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
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One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: The Moon's Inner Vision - Te no Yubai
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
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One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: How Noisy, the Sound of Insects Calling in the Meadow/ As for Me, I Make No Sound but Think of Love
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
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One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: The Bottom of the Bucket/ Which Lady Chiyo Filled Has Fallen Out/ The Moon Has No Home in the Water
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
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One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: Does the Cuckoo Also/ Announce its Name from above the Clouds?/ Yorimasa Extemporizes/ I Only Bent my Bow/ And the Arrow Shot Itself
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: As I Look Out into the Vast Expanse/ Can This be the Same Moon/ That I Saw Rise in Kasuga behind Mount Mikasa?
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: Since the Crescent Moon I Have Been Waiting for Tonight - Old Man
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: Full Moon/ On the Tatami Mats/ Shadows of the Pine Branches - Kikaku
This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints ...
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100 Poems by 100 Poets
This illustrated book of Ogura hyakunin isshu (One hundred poets, one hundred poems) is a collection of one hundred 31-syllable classical Japanese poems (waka), each by a different poet. The collection is organized chronologically from Emperor Tenji (626-671) to Emperor Juntoku (1197-1242). Each of the poets is depicted by a woodblock print created by Hishikawa Moronobu (1618-circa 1694). Morobonu is often considered the first Ukiyo-e artist.
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Plum Tree of a Country Farmhouse
Along with new artwork, a new and less formal style of poetry called haikai (linked verse) spread among the urbanites of Kyoto, Osaka, and Edo in 17th-century Japan. Haikai was also very much a social activity, with linked-verse parties held on regular occasions in homes or at restaurants. Such poetic gatherings helped give rise to privately commissioned woodblock prints, called surimono (printed matter), which paired images with representative verses from the circle. Both were typically intended to carry the cachet of “insider knowledge” for a cultured and well-educated audience. Because ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Tagasago Couple in the Hollow of a Pine Tree
A new and less formal style of poetry called haikai (linked verse) spread among the urbanites of Kyoto, Osaka, and Edo in 17th-century Japan. Haikai was also very much a social activity, with linked-verse parties held on regular occasions in homes or at restaurants. Such poetic gatherings helped give rise to privately commissioned woodblock prints, called surimono (printed matter), which paired images with representative verses from the circle. Both were typically intended to carry the cachet of “insider knowledge” for a cultured and well-educated audience. Because such surimono were not ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Baby Whitefish
A new and less formal style of poetry called haikai (linked verse) spread among the urbanites of Kyoto, Osaka, and Edo in 17th-century Japan. Haikai was also very much a social activity, with linked-verse parties held on regular occasions in homes or at restaurants. Such poetic gatherings helped give rise to privately commissioned woodblock prints, called surimono (printed matter), which paired images with representative verses from the circle. Both were typically intended to carry the cachet of “insider knowledge” for a cultured and well-educated audience. Because such surimono were not ...
Contributed by Library of Congress