16 results in English
Ukrainian People in the Past and Present
This book is the first volume of what became a two-volume, Russian-language encyclopedia of the Ukrainian people. The authors of the articles were prominent Ukrainian and Russian scholars. They included S. Rudnitskii, who wrote about geography of Ukraine; O. Rusov, V. Ohrimovich and S. Tomashevskii, who wrote about population statistics; F. Vovk, whose article was on anthropological and ethnographic features specific to the Ukrainians; and O. Shakhmatov, who contributed a history of the Ukrainian language. The book includes numerous illustrations. World War I interrupted the production of the encyclopedia, but ...
The Uganda Journal, Volume III, Number 4, April 1936
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
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The Generations of the Nations, or the Descendants of Humanity
Ṭabaqāt al-umam aw Al-salāʼil al-basharīyah (The generations of the nations, or The descendants of humanity) is an ambitious work of ethnography and anthropology, aimed at describing human societies in both their historical development and contemporary features. The book was published in 1912 by the Hilāl printing house of Cairo. Its author, Jirjī Zaydān, was born in Beirut in 1861 and studied medicine at the local American University. He later completed his literary and philosophical education in Cairo, before returning to Lebanon, where he studied Hebrew and Syriac. Zaydān worked as ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
Across the Border, or Pathan and Biloch
Across the Border, or Pathan and Biloch is a work of ethnographic description by little-known English writer Edward Emmerson Oliver. It deals with the Afghan and Baluch tribes of the northwest frontier of British India bordering Afghanistan (in what is today Pakistan) and of Afghanistan itself. The book is in a long line of British writing about these territories going back to the foundational study of Mountstuart Elphinstone (1779−1859‏), An Account of the Kingdom of Caubul and its Dependencies in Persia, Tartary, and India, published in 1815. Unlike Elphinstone ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
New and Detailed Sketch of the Arctic Lands, by Andreas Boreus, the Swede
Andreas Bureus (1571–1646) is known as the father of Swedish cartography. He embarked upon a career in the Royal Chancellery in 1602 and was entrusted with several important missions in the service of the state. In 1628 he was assigned the task of founding what was to become the Swedish National Land Survey. In 1624 he was made a member of the Swedish nobility with the name Anders Bure. Bureus completed this map of the Nordic countries in 1626 after several years of collecting data. It was printed on ...
Australia in 142 Photographic Illustrations after a Decade of Experiences
William Blandowski (1822−78) was a pioneer in many ways. Born in Gleiwitz, Upper Silesia (present-day Gliwice, Poland), he went to Australia in 1849 to compile "a natural history, a botanical classification, and a geological arrangement of this country." He joined an early gold rush in Victoria, where he invented a powerful water pump. Blandowski went on several expeditions, on which he collected numerous specimens and attempted to compile the first checklist of the mammals and birds of Victoria. His drawings are notable for their accuracy and artistic value. Largely ...
Relation of what Occurred in New France in the Year 1634
Relation de ce qui s’est passé en la Nouvelle France en l'année 1634 (Relation of what occurred in New France in the year 1634) is without doubt the finest of the Jesuit Relations published in Paris between 1632 and 1673. Written by the French missionary Paul Le Jeune (1592−1664), the work is known for its literary quality as well as its observations on the Montagnais Indians. Born near the city of Châlons-sur-Marne, in the region of Champagne, Le Jeune spent two years, between 1613 and 1615, as ...
The Long Journey to the Land of the Hurons, Located in America, near the Mer douce to the Far Borders of New France, Called Canada
Gabriel Sagard (circa 1590‒circa 1640) was a Recollet brother who in 1623‒24 lived among the Hurons, France’s main Indian allies at the time. Accompanied by Father Nicolas Viel, Sagard left his monastery in Paris in March 1623 and arrived in Quebec some three months later. In August Sagard, Viel, and one other Recollet missionary, Father Joseph Le Caron, set out for the Huron country with a party of Hurons returning from their annual exchange of furs with the French. Sagard lived among the Hurons until May 1624 ...
The Bedouins, or Arabs of the Desert
Les Bédouins, ou Arabes du désert (The Bedouins, or Arabs of the desert) is a transcription and translation by F.J. Mayeux of original ethnographic notes by the Franco-Egyptian intellectual Dom Raphaël de Monachis (also known as Anton Zakhur, Antoun Zakhurah, al-Qass Rafa’il, and Rafa’l al-Qibti). A Melkite (Greek Catholic) priest who was born in Egypt in 1759, Dom Raphaël met Napoleon Bonaparte shortly after the latter arrived in Egypt with his army in 1798. He soon was attached as translator and cultural advisor to the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
On the South Arabian Folk Tales
Alfred Freiherr von Kremer (1828 ‒89) was an Austrian orientalist and diplomat. He studied law at the University of Vienna and classical oriental languages at the Oriental Academy (now the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna). Upon the completion of his studies, he was sent by the Imperial Academy of Sciences (now the Austrian Academy of Sciences) to Syria and Egypt in 1849‒51 to collect Arabic manuscripts. It was during this journey that he discovered Kitāb al-maghāzī (The book of conquests [of Prophet Muhammad]) by Muhammad ibn ʻUmar al-Waqidi (747 or ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Annals of Oman to 1728
Annals of Oman to 1728 is a translation into English of the portions dealing with the history of Oman of a much longer work on Islamic history by Sihan ibn Saʻid al-Izkiwi entitled Kashf al-ghummah al-jāmiʻ li-akhbār al-ummah (Removing consternation: Compilation of the history of the nation). The work in its entirety covers seven volumes in the published edition. The translator is Charles Edward Ross (1836‒1913), a British official in the Persian Gulf. Little is known of the author, al-Izkiwi. Scholars who have studied the text have had no ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Note on the Tribes of the Aden Protectorate
Note on the Tribes of the Aden Protectorate is an annotated list of the Arab tribes and sub-tribes of the Aden Protectorate. The short monograph was prepared by a Captain Knapp of the Royal Artillery. It is undated, but based on internal evidence it can be surmised that it was compiled sometime before administrative functions were transferred from the government of India to the British Foreign Office in 1917. The Aden Protectorate, like the Trucial States of the Persian Gulf and the tribal areas of India’s Northwest Frontier, was ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
An Account of the Arab Tribes in the Vicinity of Aden
An Account of the Arab Tribes in the Vicinity of Aden is an ethnography prepared for use by the British administrators and army in the Aden Protectorate. It was first published in 1886. This edition of 1909 was “corrected and added to by various officers of the Aden Residency” until September 1907. The Aden Residency and the Aden Protectorate were not the same entities. The residency governed the town and port of Aden, beginning in 1839. The protectorate was established in 1886 with the conclusion of separate treaties with tribes ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
László Magyar's Travels in Southern Africa Between 1849 and 1857
László Magyar (1814-64) was a Hungarian explorer who lived for 17 years in Angola and made important contributions to the study of the geography and ethnography of equatorial Africa. He was trained as a naval officer and served in the naval forces of Austria and Argentina. In 1846, he undertook his first expedition in Africa, a voyage up the Congo River. Magyar subsequently married a daughter of the King of Bihé and used his family connections to gain access to interior regions of the continent. Accompanied by a royal guard ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Asiatic Russia, Volumes 1 and 2
This work, commissioned by the Resettlement Department of the Land Regulation and Agriculture Administration in Saint Petersburg, contains some of the best research of the early 20th century on what in the Russian Empire was commonly referred to as Asiatic Russia. Volume I covers the gradual resettlement of Russian peoples beyond the Ural Mountains, to Siberia, the steppe areas, Turkestan, and the Far East, a migration that was encouraged by the construction of the Trans-Siberian Railway in the 1890s. It includes essays on the history of Russian settlement, ethnography, and ...
Ethnographic Map of the Balkan Peninsula
The dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire at the end of World War I transformed the political organization of the Balkans. The war had started in the Balkans with the assassination of the Habsburg Archduke Franz Ferdinand by a militant Bosnian Serb seeking independence for his country from the dual empire. Jovan Cvijić, the author of this “ethnographic map” of the Balkans, published in 1918 by the American Geographical Society of New York, was a professor of geography at the University of Belgrade. Cvijić completed his doctorate at the University of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress