17 results in English
Map of the Discoveries Made of the Northwest Coast of North America
Antonio María de Bucareli y Ursúa (1717‒79) was born in Seville, Spain. He served as captain general of Cuba from 1766 to 1771 and as viceroy of New Spain from 1771 to 1779. He reorganized the Spanish military units in the viceroyalty and strengthened and rebuilt fortifications along the Pacific coast and on the Gulf of Mexico, with the objective of forestalling encroachments by other powers. Bucareli took a keen interest in the northern reaches of New Spain. He fought Indian insurrections, invested in fortifying presidios and Spanish and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Small Map of Discoveries by the Russians between Asia and North America
This French map of Alaska, Siberia, and the North Pacific, published in 1747, was based upon geographical information gleaned from earlier Russian voyages. It was created by the French cartographer, Jacques-Nicolas Bellin (1703‒72), and published by the French author, Abbé Prévost. Trained as a hydrographer, Bellin was attached to the French Marine Office and specialized in producing maritime maps showing coastlines. In 1764 he published Le Petit Atlas Maritime (Small maritime atlas), a work in five volumes containing 581 maps. This map outlines the routes taken on the voyages ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Russian Discoveries from the Map Published by the Imperial Academy of Saint Petersburg
This map, showing the known geography of Alaska in the late 18th century, was based on an original Russian map by Gerhard Friedrich Müller published in 1754 by the Imperial Academy of Saint Petersburg. The map was printed in 1775 on Fleet Street in London by Robert Sayer, a noted English map and print seller. Because the North Pacific and Arctic constituted the last largely unknown parts of the world at this time, early maps of Alaska were popular in Western Europe and were frequently reprinted. The map was published ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Gulf of Aden Pilot
Derrotero del Golfo de Aden (Gulf of Aden pilot) is a set of navigational instructions in Spanish for the Gulf of Aden, the east coast of Arabia, Socotra and adjacent islands, and the coast of Somalia. Shown here is the revised and updated second edition published in 1887. Most of the information is derived from other publications, namely the 1885 French pilot Instructions nautiques sur la mer Rouge et le golfe d’Aden (Nautical instructions for the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden) and the 1882 Gulf of Aden ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Coast from Cape Zelenyi. Batumi
In 1905 and again in 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) traveled and photographed extensively in the Caucasus region. He was particularly interested in exploring the southern part of Georgia near the Turkish border. Much of the southern Caucasus was absorbed into the Ottoman Empire in the early 16th century, and some local groups, including the Adjars, converted to Islam. In the 19th century this semitropical area witnessed expansion by the Russian Empire, which took the territory of Ach’ara from the Ottomans in 1878. By the 20th ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Batum Coast
In 1905 Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) traveled and photographed extensively in the Caucasus region. In the spring of 1912, Prokudin-Gorskii returned to the Caucasus region, including the territory of Georgia. The various kingdoms of the southern Caucasus were dominated by the Ottoman Empire beginning in the first half of the 16th century. In the 19th century the Russian Empire expanded into the area, particularly following the conclusion of the Caucasian War in 1864. Of special interest was the southern region of Ach’ara and its port city ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
General View of Monastery and Seacoast from the Cell of Father Tiverii. Novyi Afon
In 1905 Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) traveled and photographed extensively in the Caucasus region. In the spring of 1912, Prokudin-Gorskii returned to photograph in the Caucasus region and along the coast of the Black Sea, including in the area of Abkhazia, located in the northern part of Georgia. Much of the Transcaucasian area was dominated by the Ottoman Empire during the 16th century. The Turks were expelled from Sukhumi, the major city in Abkhazia, in 1810, and the area was annexed by the Russian Empire in 1864 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Novyi Afon Monastery. View from the Iver Mountain
In 1905 Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) traveled and photographed extensively in the Caucasus region. In the spring of 1912, Prokudin-Gorskii returned to photograph in the Caucasus region and along the coast of the Black Sea, including in the area of Abkhazia, located in the northern part of Georgia. Much of the Transcaucasian area was dominated by the Ottoman Empire during the 16th century. The Turks were expelled from Sukhumi, the major city in Abkhazia, in 1810, and the area was annexed by the Russian Empire in 1864 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Seacoast at Gagra (Toward Adler)
In 1905 Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) traveled and photographed extensively in the Caucasus region. In the spring of 1912, Prokudin-Gorskii returned to photograph in the Caucasus region, including the resort of Gagra in Abkhazia, located in the northern part of Georgia and on the coast of the Black Sea. Much of the Transcaucasian area was dominated by the Ottoman Empire during the 16th century. In 1810, the Turks were expelled from the area, but the Russian settlement at Gagra remained isolated and was subject to attack from ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Seacoast at Gagra
In 1905 Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) traveled and photographed extensively in the Caucasus region. In the spring of 1912, Prokudin-Gorskii returned to photograph in the Caucasus region, including the resort of Gagra in Abkhazia, located in the northern part of Georgia and on the coast of the Black Sea. Much of the Transcaucasian area was dominated by the Ottoman Empire during the 16th century. In 1810, the Turks were expelled from the area, but the Russian settlement at Gagra remained isolated and was subject to attack from ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Gagra from the Road to Adler
In 1905 Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) traveled and photographed extensively in the Caucasus region. In the spring of 1912, Prokudin-Gorskii returned to photograph in the Caucasus region, including the resort of Gagra in Abkhazia, located in the northern part of Georgia and on the coast of the Black Sea. Much of the Transcaucasian area was dominated by the Ottoman Empire during the 16th century. In 1810, the Turks were expelled from the area, but the Russian settlement at Gagra remained isolated and was subject to attack from ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Gagra. From the Pier
In 1905 Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) traveled and photographed extensively in the Caucasus region. In the spring of 1912, Prokudin-Gorskii returned to photograph in the Caucasus region, including the resort of Gagra in Abkhazia, located in the northern part of Georgia and on the coast of the Black Sea. Much of the Transcaucasian area was dominated by the Ottoman Empire during the 16th century. In 1810, the Turks were expelled from the area, but the Russian settlement at Gagra remained isolated and was subject to attack from ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
General View of Novye Gagry
In 1905 Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) traveled and photographed extensively in the Caucasus region. In the spring of 1912, Prokudin-Gorskii returned to photograph in the Caucasus region, including the resort of Gagra in Abkhazia, located in the northern part of Georgia and on the coast of the Black Sea. Much of the Transcaucasian area was dominated by the Ottoman Empire during the 16th century. In 1810, the Turks were expelled from the area, but the Russian settlement at Gagra remained isolated and was subject to attack from ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sochi and Seacoast
In 1905 Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) traveled and photographed extensively in the Caucasus region. In 1912, Prokudin-Gorskii returned to photograph in the Caucasus region, including extensively along the coast of the Black Sea. This view, taken from the hills to the east, shows the lower part of the Sochi River valley and a number of large white stuccoed masonry buildings. Less that 50 kilometers in length, the Sochi River originates at the Large (Bolshaia) Shura Mountain on the edge of the western Caucasus Mountains, flows through the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Inflow of the Dagomys River into the Sea and Sochi's Cape
Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made a number of trips to the Caucasus region, including one in the summer of 1912. On this trip, he photographed extensively along the coast of the Black Sea in the area of Sochi. After the end of the Caucasian War in 1864, Russia encouraged settlers to move into the coastal area, which became a part of Chernomorskaia guberniia (Black Sea Province). The imperial court also acquired extensive land near the coast, especially during the reign of Nicholas II. A portion of this ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Seacoast at Gagra
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Large, Western-Style Wooden Building Atop Small Hill Overlooking Harbor, Samoa
This early-20th century photograph shows the governor's mansion on Togo Togo Ridge in Utulei, American Samoa, overlooking the harbor of Pago Pago. The mansion has served as the residence of all the governors of American Samoa, naval and civilian, from its construction in 1903 to the present. The photograph is by A.J. Tattersall, who wrote on its reverse side: “I warn anyone against using this copy without my permission. A.T., Photo, Samoa.” Tattersall was born in Auckland, New Zealand, in 1861, and was employed by photographic firms ...
Contributed by Library of Congress