24 results in English
The Humors, Devil to-Suppress "Kwai-Danzi"
The victory of Japan in the Russo-Japanese War of 1904–5, a collision over economic and political influence in Korea and Manchuria, marked the first victory of an Asian nation over a European power. This unexpected turn of events compelled the West to reassess the status of Japan in the international political order. Among Asian nations, it shattered the image of the invincibility of Western authority. While many in Japan were dissatisfied with the peace treaty that ended the war, Japan’s victory nevertheless confirmed the success of the Meiji ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
H.P. & W.C. Taylor, Perfumers
This advertisement for the Philadelphia firm of H.P. & W.C. Taylor, Perfumers, portrays aspects of industry, transportation, and marketing in mid-19th century America. The central image shows a shipping scene at a pier above the Navy Yard on the Delaware River. Laborers are seen loading a ship with goods from a pier on which a horse-drawn wagon and cart are surrounded by crates. Members of the ship’s crew line the deck of the steamer, and a barge is moored near the pier. On the dock, a horse-drawn coach ...
John C. Farr and Company, Importers of Watches, Watchmakers Tools, Silver and Plated Ware, Musical Boxes, Et cetera. Number 112 Chestnut Street between Third and Fourth Streets, Philadelphia
This advertising print from circa 1850 shows street and pedestrian activity in front of the four-story corner storefront of the jewelry and watch store located at 112 ( i.e., 316) Chestnut Street in Philadelphia. A sign illustrated with a watch and reading, “No. 112 John C. Farr & Co. Wholesale and Retail,” adorns the side of the building. The sign is over a window with a shade that advertises watches, jewelry, and silverware. At the store entrance, a clerk greets two ladies and a girl between the display windows filled with silverware, jewelry, and watches. In front of the store, a lady and gentleman converse near the horses of an out-of-view carriage. At the corner, a man (possibly a store clerk) talks with two ladies who are accompanied by a child and dog. A partial view of the neighboring business (Eugene Roussel, perfumer) can be seen, including signage and the display window of the shop. This print also contains a Gothic-style border and pictorial elements that flank the central image. The pictorial elements are a clock sculpture, a pocket watch, and embellished text reading, “Watches” and “Jewelry.” Text at the bottom reads: “John C. Farr & Co. Importers of watches, watchmakers tools. Silver & plated ware, musical boxes, &c.” Farr started his business in the mid-1820s and changed the firm name to John C. Farr & Company in 1850. The business relocated circa 1854. This lithograph was printed by one of the most prominent lithographers and printers of the day, Peter S. Duval. Duval was born circa 1804 or 1805 in France. He emigrated from France to Philadelphia in the fall of 1831 to accept a job as a lithographer with the printing firm of Childs & Inman. By 1837 he had established his lithographic printing shop; he remained in business until his retirement in 1869.
Commissioners Hall, Spring Garden
This 1851 chromolithograph shows an exterior view of the hall completed in 1848 after the designs of architect William L. Johnston, and located at Spring Garden and North 13th streets in Philadelphia. The hall contained the office of the mayor and the police station for the district. This view shows the Greek-Revival style building, adorned with an American flag and a steeple built by Jacob Berger. The steeple contained a clock made by T. Tyson. This print also shows pedestrian traffic on the adjacent streets, including strolling couples, a man ...
H. B. McCalla, Successor to the Late Andrew McCalla. Number 252 Market Street. First Hat and Cap Store below 8th Street, South Side, Philadelphia
This circa 1852 chromolithograph is an advertising print showing the three-and-one-half story storefront located on the 700 block of Market Street in Philadelphia. The building is covered in advertising text, reading: "The Cheapest Wholesale & Retail Hat and Cap Manufactory in the World. Fashionable Styles. Caps. Hats." The attic window of the building also displays signage that reads, "Hat and Cap Store," and a large model hat and cap adorn the roof of the building. Boxes, hats, and milliners at work are visible in the upper windows. A male patron enters through one of the two open doorways to the establishment. Inside, a clerk surveys stacks of hats across from a flight of stairs. At the other end of the store, another clerk assists a patron, standing in front of a mirror, as he tries on hats next to shelves of merchandise. In a display window between the two entryways, hats and caps for men and boys are displayed, flanked by cases of hats and caps outside. In the street, a horse-drawn dray is positioned to receive a delivery opposite a laborer retrieving a crate labeled "M. Dormitzen Middleport Sch. County" from the store cellar. Labeled crates line the sidewalk with addressees that include: "Heitner & Shay Augusta Northumberland Co. Pa."; "T.L. Mitchell Jefferson Co. Pa."; "Young & Lee Allentown Pa."; "Geo. L. Reppler St. Clair Schuylkill Co."; and "Geo. Far... Centre Co. Pa." Partial views of adjacent businesses can be seen; one business displays blankets and a trunk near its entry and another contains signs reading: "Deposi...Roots...Every" and "Branch Americ..." H.B. McCalla took over ...
View of the Philadelphia Volunteer Refreshment Saloons
This Civil War souvenir print contains six views of the Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon and of the Cooper Shop Volunteer Refreshment Saloon in Philadelphia. The street addresses of both saloons are shown. The relief organization establishments, situated at the transportation hub between the North and South, provided hospital care, washing, sleeping, and writing facilities to more than 1 million military personnel, sailors, refugees, and freedmen in the course of the war. The print features a large central view of the exterior of the Union saloon with troops arriving and entering ...
View of the Encampment of the Corn Exchange Regiment, 118th Pennsylvania Volunteers, near Falls of Schuylkill
This chromolithograph by artist John L. Magee shows a group of civilians gathered near a large flagpole watching a regiment drill in front of tents at “Camp Union,” the camp near East Falls, Philadelphia. Civilians include men and women on horseback, women in a carriage, a family with their pet dog, and a child playing with a hoop. A military band is seen leading the troops. Officers ride on horseback, while other civilians walk the tree-lined circumference of the camp. The names of the "Committee of the Corn Exchange Regiment ...
Citizens Volunteer Hospital. Corner of Broad Street and Washington Avenue
This Civil War fundraising certificate contains views of the exterior and interior of the volunteer hospital opposite the Philadelphia, Wilmington, & Baltimore Railroad depot in Philadelphia. The hospital opened on September 5, 1862, and closed on August 11, 1865. During the American Civil War, the hospital provided care to the most seriously wounded before their reassignment to other hospitals. The exterior view shows civilians and a troop of Union soldiers standing in front of the hospital as a train arrives. The interior view shows rows of beds lining a central hallway. Women volunteers attend to bed-ridden soldiers and set a long table for a meal. The illustrations are framed by decorative motifs that include the seal of the city of Philadelphia; angels hovering above an able-bodied and an injured soldier in front of columns inscribed "The Glory of the Volunteer"; American flags; and floral elements. The work is by James Fuller Queen, a Philadelphia lithographer and pioneer chromolithographer. Queen served in the militia in 1862–63 and created several lithographs with Civil War subjects, including contribution certificates for the city's relief institutions.
Independence Square Recruiting Camps
In September–October 1862, Independence Square in Philadelphia became Camp Independence, a Civil War recruitment camp. This trade card, produced by the Children’s Central Clothing Emporium, shows well-dressed children on the central promenade of the square. Tents manned by soldiers line the promenade, and a group of children carrying drums, flags, and a hoop are seen walking in the foreground, along with a mother and son. The work is by James Fuller Queen, a Philadelphia lithographer and pioneer chromolithographer known for his attention to detail. Queen served in the ...
Cooper Shop Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, the First Opened for Union Volunteers in the United States. 1009 Otsego Street, Philadelphia
This chromolithograph from 1862 shows an exterior and an interior view of the Cooper Shop Volunteer Refreshment Saloon situated near the Philadelphia, Wilmington, and Baltimore Railroad station in Philadelphia, an important transportation hub between the North and the South during the Civil War. The exterior view shows troops who have recently arrived marching toward and into the saloon. Civilians on the street intermingle with soldiers, including Zouaves. Banners and flags promoting the Cooper Shop and soliciting contributions adorn the saloon buildings. At the top of the image, the personified figure ...
Jones and Company of the Crescent One Price Clothing Store. Number 200 Market Street above 6th Street, Philadelphia
This advertising print from circa 1855 depicts the two-bay, five-story, green building that had been occupied by a clothing store owned by Owen Jones since 1846. The building was located at 200 Market Street, just north of Sixth Street, in Philadelphia. White text covers the facade of the building, advertising the business as a cheap, “one price” clothing store. Lettering at the top of the building advertises, “The Crescent One Price Clothing Store,” and several crescent shapes are seen on the building. A columned arcade extends along the ground floor ...
Grand Lodge Room of the New Masonic Hall. Chestnut Street, Philadelphia
This 1855 commemorative print shows the ornately decorated grand lodge room on the second floor of the New Masonic Hall, located at 713-721 Chestnut Street in Philadelphia. The hall was built 1853–55 after the designs of the Philadelphia architectural firm Sloan & Stewart, established in 1853 by architect Samuel Sloan and carpenter John Stewart. Rows of cushioned benches with carved backs line the room, which is adorned with gold vaulting over the turquoise-colored walls and ceiling. Interrupting the seating are two daises with lavish thrones; these are adorned with ornate Gothic-style canopies containing sculpted allegorical female figures. The larger dais dominates the background. A large gilt chandelier hangs over this dais, which contains several Gothic-style chairs, two chests, and sculpture displayed on pedestals and in alcoves. The smaller dais includes a chair ...
Goodyears Rubber-Packing and Belting Company
This circa 1856 advertising print shows the five-story offices and storefront known as the Girard Building (102-104, i.e., 306-308 Chestnut Street), in Philadelphia. The building was tenanted by Goodyears, i.e., the Philadelphia warehouse of the New York Belting and Packing Company (104); and "Peterson's Book Establishment," i.e., the store of bookseller T.B. Peterson & Brothers, and C. J. Peterson, publisher of Peterson’s Ladies National Magazine (102). Lettering reading "Goodyears Rubber Packing & Belting Company" adorns the roof. Through open entryways and large display windows, clerks, patrons, and merchandise displays are visible in both stores. At Peterson's, clerks assist patrons with items from ...
James S. Mason and Company, 108 North Front Street, Challenge Blacking, Ink, Etcetera, Manufactory
This print is an advertisement for James S. Mason & Co., a manufacturer of ink and blacking located on North Front Street in Philadelphia. The illustration shows a five-story brick and granite building adorned with a large sign reading "Blacking" (a 19th-century term for shoe and boot polish) on its roof. A patron opens the entrance door of the storefront as he peers at a large illustrated print on display in an adjacent window. On the second floor, above the window adorned with the print, a couple is visible in an ...
Souvenir of the Coldest Winter on Record. Scene on the Delaware River at Philadelphia during the Severe Winter of 1856
In the mid-19th century, the winter of 1856 was known as the coldest on record. This genre scene from Philadelphia shows hundreds of persons skating and sledding on the frozen Delaware River in front of the old Navy Yard at Southwark. The participants include men pushing women in chairs with blades, men pushing a sleigh of women passengers, a man pulling a boy on a sled, and a man being pulled by a dog running through a crowd of skaters. In the foreground, a couple stands and watches; a woman ...
Interior View of Independence Hall, Philadelphia
This 1856 chromolithograph shows visitors of all ages gathered in the Assembly Room of Independence Hall in Philadelphia, which is being used as an exhibit gallery. Men, women, and children promenade, converse, and admire the artifacts that adorn the room, which has a parquet floor. Framed artwork lines the paneled walls, predominately from the portrait collection of American painter Charles Wilson Peale. Also seen are the portrait painting of William Penn by artist Henry Inman, and the portrait painting of the Marquis de Lafayette by artist Thomas Sully. In the ...
McNeely & Company, Manufacturers of Morocco, Buckskin & Chamois, White Leather, Bark Tanned, Sheep, Calf & Deer Skins, Parchment, Vellum, Et cetera. 64 North 4th Street below Arch Street near the Merchants Hotel, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the large McNeeley factory complex of several industrial buildings, sheds, and fenced yard near a busy street and sidewalk. Workers attend to a maze of drying lines on which hang leather pieces. Delivery carts traverse the yard and depart through the gate under the McNeeley sign. A laborer uses a horse-drawn cart to collect coal from a mound on the side of the main ...
Doctor Hoofland's Celebrated German Bitters and Balsamic Cordial. Prepared by Doctor C. M. Jackson, 418 Arch Street, Philadelphia
This colored advertising print from 1859 features an exterior view of the patent medicine shop operated by C.M. Jackson at 418 Arch Street in Philadelphia. The four-story building, adjacent to a walled courtyard, contains a date marker reading "1855"; lettering on the roof that spells out "C.M. Jackson"; and text on the side of the building that advertises "Dr. Hooflands German Bitters and Balsamic Cordial." Pedestrians walk and converse on the sidewalk and a horse-drawn carriage passes in the street. The illustration is surrounded by an arch-shaped decorative ...
Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, Supported Gratuitously by the Citizens of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
This print depicts the Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, located at the southwest corner of Swanson and Washington Avenues in Philadelphia during the American Civil War. The saloon was a volunteer relief agency supported by the citizens of Philadelphia, which provided meals, hospital care, and washing, sleeping, and writing facilities to military personnel, refugees, and freedmen throughout the war. The print shows soldiers, cheered by civilian onlookers, marching out from the main building to embark on cars of the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad for transport to the battlefields to the ...
Bird’s-Eye View of Property on Alleghany Avenue, Philadelphia, 25th Ward
This print shows a bird's eye view of the grid plan of the city of Philadelphia, looking southeast from Frankford Road in northeast Philadelphia toward the Delaware River. The area depicted lies between Westmoreland Street and a few blocks south of Columbia Street, consisting mainly of the open land surrounding the Aramingo Canal, the Reading Railroad depot between Lehigh Avenue and Somerset Street, and the tracks of the Philadelphia, Trenton, and New York Railroad line. A few dwellings, churches, and other structures comprise the landscape, with a heavier concentration ...
Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, of Philadelphia
This print is a lively scene from November 1863 containing a view of the two hospitals, refreshment stand, and other buildings of the Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon located near the Navy Yard at Swanson and Washington Avenues in Philadelphia during the American Civil War. Situated at the transportation hub between the North and the South on land leased for free from the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad, the saloon was a volunteer relief agency that provided meals, hospital care, washing, sleeping, and writing facilities to military personnel, refugees, and freedmen. It ...
Great Central Fair Buildings, Philadelphia
The Great Central (or Sanitary) Fair took place in Philadelphia in June 1864. The purpose of the fair, which featured art, craft, and historical exhibits, was to raise funds for the United States Sanitary Commission. This was a private organization during the American Civil War, which operated under the authority of the federal government to provide relief to soldiers and assistance to the Union army in matters relating to health and hygiene. The commission played a major role in mobilizing civilian support for the Union cause and represented the largest ...
Buildings of the Great Central Fair, in Aid of the U.S. Sanitary Commission, Logan Square, Philadelphia, June 1864
The Great Central Fair took place in Philadelphia in June 1864. The purpose of the fair, which featured art, craft, and historical exhibits, was to raise funds for the United States Sanitary Commission. This was a private organization that operated during the American Civil War under the authority of the federal government to provide relief to soldiers and assistance to the Union army in matters relating to health and hygiene. This print is a bird's-eye view of the exhibition grounds at Logan Square that was printed and for sale ...
Mower U.S.A. General Hospital, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia
This print is a bird's eye view of the Mower General Hospital, operated by the U.S. Army during the American Civil War. Built in 1862 after the designs of Philadelphia architect John McArthur, Jr., the hospital was located opposite the Chestnut Hill track of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad. The hospital received injured soldiers transported directly from the battlefield between January 1863 and May 1865. Designed as a pavilion to control the spread of infection, it consisted of hospital wards radiating from a central enclosed complex of administrative ...