17 results in English
Hatamoto (Senior Samurai of the Shogun) Corps Formation Rules
Presented here is an emaki (horizontal picture scroll) that depicts a battle formation procession setting off for the battlefield. It is 13 meters long. At first sight, it resembles the Kan’ei Gyōkoki (Record of an imperial visit in the Kan’ei period), in which pictures and letters are printed in type. However, the characters and horses were not printed in type, but were affixed using stamps. The actual number of stamps used is surprisingly small. The 54 mounted soldiers in the scroll were created from just five stamps, but ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Map Showing Wet Areas on Passchendaele Front
Overprinted in color in the field, this World War I map shows the Allied front line at the Ypres Salient on December 2, 1917. The notorious Battle of Passchendaele (also seen as Passendale) began in July 1917 and culminated in the capture by British and Canadian forces of the village of Passchendaele (West Flanders, Belgium) on November 6. Even though the battle had ended some weeks earlier, an action took place on the night of December 1−2 in the areas to the north and east of Passchendaele village shown ...
Contributed by The British Library
British Battles During 1918 (8th August to 11th November 1918)
This colorful map was produced by the Geographical Section of the General Staff of the UK War Office, printed by Waterlow & Sons, and made available for public sale shortly after the end of World War I. It provides a summary of the Hundred Days offensive by British, American, and British Empire troops that led to the German surrender on November 11, 1918. It shows the Allied advance as distinctly ordered phases, colored first yellow, then green, red, and blue. Diagonal stripes in these same colors show German withdrawals. The numbers ...
Contributed by The British Library
Zaravshan Okrug. Cholpon-Ata Hill Marked by the Victory over Troops of the Bukharan Emir on May 1, 1868
This photograph is from the historical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The compiler of the first three parts was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Touring Map of the Custer Battlefield Highway: The Scenic Route to the West
The Custer Battlefield Highway was created in 1925 as a scenic route between Iowa and Montana. The National Highways Association printed this large colored wall map, the “Touring Map of the Custer Battlefield Hiway: The Scenic Route to the West,” under a contract with the Custer Battlefield Highway Association. The association subsequently gave the map to its members. The highway began in Des Moines, Iowa, passed through Iowa, South Dakota, Wyoming, and Montana, and ended at the Canadian border in Glacier National Park. It was named in honor of George ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Order of Battle on Western Front. 11 a.m., November 11, 1918
World War I ended with the entering into effect of the armistice at 11 a.m. on November 11, 1918. This map, drawn up at the headquarters of the General John J. Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Forces, shows the order of battle at the time the fighting stopped. Allied forces are arrayed in a wide arc stretching from the Swiss border to the North Sea, with the Belgians and British on the left, the French in the center and on the right, and the Americans occupying a central ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Presumed Enemy Order of Battle. October 7, 1918
This U.S. Army map from World War I shows the U.S. and opposing German lines and presumed enemy order of battle in the vicinity of Sommerance, France, on October 7, 1918. German forces are classified by their quality of fighting skill; the best units are ranked as first class and poorest as fourth class. Units are broken down into division and then regiment. The length of time a unit had spent on the front line is noted as such information could help planners determine the combat effectiveness or ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Allied and Enemy Positions in the Sommerance Region. October 2, 1918
This U.S. Army map shows the situation in the Sommerance region of the Western front on October 2, 1918, a little more than a month before the end of World War I. The map, which identifies German positions, was distributed to officers down to the company commander level. A notice reads: “Information from captured German maps, prisoner’s statements and recent aeroplane photographs.” Behind the German trench line sits the Kriemhilde Stellung, the eastern end of the larger Hindenburg Line comprising a vast system of defenses in northeastern France ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Meuse-Argonne Offensive. Map Showing Daily Position of Front Line
World War I ended with the entering into effect of the armistice at 11 a.m. on November 11, 1918. The final chapter of the war began on September 26, when the British, French, Belgian, and American armies attacked along a wide front with 123 divisions, with 57 divisions in reserve. Defending were 197 German divisions, of which only 51 were classed by allied intelligence as fully battle worthy. The main American attack was carried out by the First Army under General John J. Pershing in the approximately 35-kilometer wide ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of the Terrain on the Left Bank of the James River Across from Jamestown, Virginia, Where a Battle Took Place on July 6, 1781, between the American Army led by the Marquis de La Fayette and the English Army under the Leadership of Lord Cornwallis
This pen-and-ink and watercolor manuscript map was drawn by Jean Nicolas Desandrouins (1729–92), an engineer with the French army of General Rochambeau during the American Revolution. It shows the layout of the Battle of Green Spring, in southeastern Virginia, on July 6, 1781. This battle came near the end of the war, and involved Continental Army troops under the Marquis de Lafayette and General Anthony Wayne and British troops under General Lord Cornwallis. The battle was a minor victory for the British and the last land battle in Virginia ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Rochambeau’s Army, 1782. Map of the Williamsburg, Virginia Area, Where the French and American Armies Camped out in September 1781
This topographic pen-and-ink and watercolor manuscript map of the Williamsburg, Virginia, area was made in 1782 by Jean Nicolas Desandrouins, a French army engineer and cartographer, shortly after the October 1781 Battle of Yorktown. It shows the encampments and positions of the French and American forces in September 1781, on the eve of the battle. The map provides a detailed plan of Williamsburg and its environs, and shows the location of estates, towns, and other significant sites. It shows houses and public buildings in Williamsburg, plantations in the countryside, roads ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of York, Virginia Showing the Attacks by the French and American Armies in October 1781
This pen-and-ink and watercolor manuscript map shows the movements of the French and American armies in the vicinity of York, Virginia, in October 1781, during the Battle of Yorktown. The map is by Querenet de la Combe, a cartographer and lieutenant colonel of engineers with the army of the French commander, General Rochambeau. York (more commonly known as Yorktown after the Revolutionary War) was founded in 1691 and became a major port for the export of tobacco. The map shows British defenses at Yorktown, as well as the parallel formations ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of the Fortifications of Yorktown, Virginia
This pen-and-ink and watercolor manuscript map shows an unfinished plan for the Siege of Yorktown in September‒October 1781. York (more commonly known as Yorktown after the Revolutionary War) was founded in 1691 and became a major port for the export of tobacco. The map shows the British defenses, advance redoubts, and roads leading into the town. It is oriented with north to the upper left. Relief is shown by hachures, and scale is approximately 1:5,000. The map has imperfections, including trimming on the upper and right edges ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Notes on the Environs of York
This pen-and-ink and watercolor manuscript map of 1781 shows the area from Williamsburg to Yorktown, between the James and York Rivers, at the time of the Battle of Yorktown, which took place in September‒October of that year. Williamsburg was founded in 1632, and it was the capital of colonial Virginia from 1699 until 1780. York (more commonly known as Yorktown after the Revolutionary War) was founded in 1691 and became a major port for the export of tobacco. The map shows roads, houses, hospitals, and a church, and it ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Assault and Siege of the Fortified City of Khodzhend from May 17 to 24, 1866
This topographic map shows the battle plan used by the Russians in the May 1866 siege of Khodzhend (present-day Khujand, Tajikistan), an ancient fortified city situated on the Syr Darya River. The map shows the citadel and surrounding structures, as well as the wall and gates that enclosed the city. Colors and an accompanying key are used to indicate gardens, vegetable plots, pastures, and cotton fields. The map is from the historical part of the Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863
The Battle of Gettysburg, one of the most decisive battles of the American Civil War, was fought on July 1–3, 1863 near a small Pennsylvania town important for its many road and railroad connections. The Confederate army under General Robert E. Lee consisted of 72,000 men and was organized into corps commanded by Generals James Longstreet, Richard S. Ewell, and Ambrose P. Hill and a cavalry corps commanded by General J.E.B. “Jeb” Stuart. The Union army commanded by General George G. Meade had about 94,000 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Battle of the Monongahela
This manuscript pen-and-ink map shows the disposition of troops at the beginning of the Battle of Monongahela, which took place on July 9, 1755, in the second year of the French and Indian War. Determined to drive the French out of western Pennsylvania, the British had sent a force of 2,000 army regulars and colonial militia commanded by General Edward Braddock to capture Fort Duquesne, located at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers in what is now downtown Pittsburgh. After an arduous march through northern Virginia and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress