19 results in English
Types of Nationalities in the Turkestan Krai. Arabs. Mulla Abubekr
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Types of Nationalities in the Turkestan Krai. Arabs. Seid Omar
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Types of Nationalities in the Turkestan Krai. Arabs. Turdi Ali
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Memoirs of an Arabian Princess: An Autobiography
Emilie Ruete (1844–1924), also known as Princess Sayyida Salme of Zanzibar and Oman, was born in Zanzibar (part of present-day Tanzania), the daughter of Saʻīd bin Sulṭān, sultan of Zanzibar and Oman. In 1867 she married a German merchant, Rudolph Heinrich Ruete (1839–70). The couple settled in Hamburg. Memoirs of an Arabian Princess is an account of Ruete’s royal youth in Zanzibar and Oman. First published in German in 1886, the book describes the culture and society of Zanzibar as experienced by an Arab girl growing to ...
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Summary of the History of the Arabs
Louis-Amélie Sédillot was a French astronomer and orientalist, son of Jean-Jacques Sédillot, who influenced the boy toward pursuing these same interests. Sédillot the younger translated and published Arabic astronomical works. Khulasat Tarikh al-‘Arab (Summary of the history of the Arabs) is a translation and adaption by ‘Ali Mubārak Pasha of Louis-Amélie Sédillot’s Histoire des Arabes. Mubārak is revered as the father of modern education in Egypt. Born in a rural village in the Nile delta, he rebelled at the quality of his early schooling. After more unsuccessful years ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
The Fragrant Blossom: A Work on Manners, Society, and Letters
Arij al-zahr: kitab akhlaqi, ijtima’i, adabi (The fragrant blossom: A work on manners, society, and letters) is a collection of essays by Shaykh Mustafa al-Ghalayini, a Lebanese Muslim teacher, writer, and authority on Islamic law. The essays cover a number of subjects presented in a readable style. Ghalayini discusses what it means to be an elegant speaker and writer in the “proper Arabic way,” avoiding the influences of what he calls a‘ujmah (non-Arabic) or afranj (European) style. In other essays, he treats the nature of mankind, the obligations ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
Creation and History
Al-Badʼ wa-al-tārīkh (Creation and history) is a universal history from the Creation until the end of the reign of Abbasid caliph al-Muti in 974. It is not a particularly good example of historical scholarship. It is in large part a list of prophets and kings, leavened with stories derived from written sources, myths, scripture, and the personal thoughts of the author, as, for example, his reflection on the many religious traditions and practices of mankind. With the exception of a strongly worded introductory warning to the reader about those who ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
Thousand and One Nights. Now First Completely Done into English Prose and Verse
Shown here is the nine-volume edition of Alf laylah wa-laylah (Thousand and one nights), known in the West as the Arabian Nights, translated by British poet John Payne (1842−1916) and privately published by the Villon Society in London in 1882−84. The tales that form the Arabian Nights have their roots many centuries ago in oral storytelling, mystical stories, and folk tales from Persia, Baghdad, Cairo, and India, which were spread by merchants and other travelers on the major trade routes of the East from the ninth century onward ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
Travels to Arabia: Pilgrimage to the Najd, Cradle of the Arab Race
Voyage en Arabie (Travels to Arabia) is an account by Lady Anne Blunt of the journey that she and her husband, the poet Wilfrid Scawen Blunt, made to the Najd region of present-day Saudi Arabia in the winter of 1878–79. Lady Anne (1837–1917), daughter of the Earl of Lovelace and granddaughter of Lord Byron, is known as both an adventurous traveler to the Middle East and as the most accomplished horsewoman and breeder of Arabian stock of her era. The book was first published in London by John ...
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The Chivalric Tradition of the Arabs
La tradition chevaleresque des Arabes (The chivalric tradition of the Arabs)is a work by Egyptian writer and politician Wacyf Boutros Ghali (1878–1958) that attempts to link the chivalric tradition of the European Middle Ages to the manners and customs of the Arabs. The author considers several key characteristics of chivalry, namely ancestral and moral pedigree; regard for women, horses, and weapons; and, above all, honor, which he regards as common to the Arabs and to medieval Europe. “If Arabia guarded the plant and flower of Honor as its ...
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The Bedouins, or Arabs of the Desert
Les Bédouins, ou Arabes du désert (The Bedouins, or Arabs of the desert) is a transcription and translation by F.J. Mayeux of original ethnographic notes by the Franco-Egyptian intellectual Dom Raphaël de Monachis (also known as Anton Zakhur, Antoun Zakhurah, al-Qass Rafa’il, and Rafa’l al-Qibti). A Melkite (Greek Catholic) priest who was born in Egypt in 1759, Dom Raphaël met Napoleon Bonaparte shortly after the latter arrived in Egypt with his army in 1798. He soon was attached as translator and cultural advisor to the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The History of Arabia, Ancient and Modern
The History of Arabia,Ancient and Modern is a two-volume study, first published in 1833, by the Scottish Presbyterian cleric and man of letters Andrew Crichton (1790−1855). In his preface, Crichton presents his book as a first effort to “connect the past with the illustrations of modern discovery so as to exhibit the whole in moderate compass,” that is, in only two volumes. He acknowledges the ill-informed and prejudicial views that many readers bring to the subject of Islam, and states that he seeks to create a simple chronological ...
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Note on the Tribes of the Aden Protectorate
Note on the Tribes of the Aden Protectorate is an annotated list of the Arab tribes and sub-tribes of the Aden Protectorate. The short monograph was prepared by a Captain Knapp of the Royal Artillery. It is undated, but based on internal evidence it can be surmised that it was compiled sometime before administrative functions were transferred from the government of India to the British Foreign Office in 1917. The Aden Protectorate, like the Trucial States of the Persian Gulf and the tribal areas of India’s Northwest Frontier, was ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
An Account of the Arab Tribes in the Vicinity of Aden
An Account of the Arab Tribes in the Vicinity of Aden is an ethnography prepared for use by the British administrators and army in the Aden Protectorate. It was first published in 1886. This edition of 1909 was “corrected and added to by various officers of the Aden Residency” until September 1907. The Aden Residency and the Aden Protectorate were not the same entities. The residency governed the town and port of Aden, beginning in 1839. The protectorate was established in 1886 with the conclusion of separate treaties with tribes ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Arab Men Racing Horses While Crowd Looks on, Tents in Background
At the conclusion of World War I, the victorious allies named Britain the mandatory power for Palestine, Transjordan, and Iraq, all former territories of the Ottoman Empire which, with Germany, had been defeated in the war. In April 1921, the British convened meetings of Arab and British officials at Amir Abdullah ibn Hussein's camp at Amman, during the course of which British High Commissioner Herbert Samuel proclaimed Amir Abdullah the ruler of the new Emirate of Transjordan. This photograph, taken at these meetings, shows a group of Arab men ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Group of Arabs, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a group of Arab men and boys in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described the old city of Algiers as presenting “a highly attractive picture of Oriental life.” Arabs were the dominant group in the population, then as now, but many of the people were Berbers or from other Mahgribi population groups. The city had been ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Arab Juggler, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of an Arab juggler performing for a crowd in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described the old city of Algiers as presenting “a highly attractive picture of Oriental life.” Arabs were the dominant group in the population, then as now, but many of the people were Berbers or from other Mahgribi population groups. The city had been ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Arabs at a Cafe, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of men gathered at a coffeehouse in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described the old city of Algiers as presenting “a highly attractive picture of Oriental life.” Arabs were the dominant group in the population, then as now, but many of the people were Berbers or from other Mahgribi population groups. Baedeker stated that “a few streets ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Arabs before a Cafe, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of Arabs at a café in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described the old city of Algiers as presenting “a highly attractive picture of Oriental life.” Arabs were the dominant group in the population, then as now, but many of the people were Berbers or from other Mahgribi population groups. Baedeker stated that “a few streets only ...
Contributed by Library of Congress