10 results in English
Ismāʻīl, the Persian Ambassador of Ṭahmāsp, King of Persia
Melchior Lorck, or Lorichs (1527–circa 1590), was the most brilliant graphic artist in 16th-century Denmark. He was born in Flensburg of distinguished parents; the Danish kings took up residence in the Lorck house when visiting the city. In 1549 King Christian III gave Lorck financial support to go on an educational journey. Lorck’s wanderlust led him throughout Europe and in the end to Vienna, where he gained employment with Emperor Charles V. From 1555 to 1559 Lorck was one of three ambassadors sent by the emperor to Constantinople ...
Ayub’s Ambassadors from Herat, 1881
This photograph of the ambassadors appointed by Ghazi Mohammad Ayūb Khān (1857–1914) is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Ayūb Khān was the son of the deposed Afghan amir, Sher ʻAlī Khān (1825–79), and cousin of the future amir, Abd al-Raḥmān Khān (1844–1901). He won a significant Afghan victory at the Battle of Maiwand in July 1880, only to be decisively defeated by Sir Frederick Roberts (1832–1914) at the Battle of Kandahar two months later ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Vice President Hannibal Hamlin
Hannibal Hamlin (1809‒91) of Maine served as vice president to President Abraham Lincoln in 1861‒65 and was the first U.S. vice president from the Republican Party. He served in the U.S. Senate as a Democrat from 1848 to 1857, but broke with his party over the issue of slavery. He was replaced by Andrew Johnson on the Republican ticket for the election of 1864, and thus did not become president when Lincoln was assassinated in April 1865. After the war, Hamlin returned to the Senate (1869 ...
Washington Irving
Washington Irving (1783‒1859) was one of the most widely read American authors of his day, and one of the first to be recognized in Europe for his works of fiction. Born in New York City of Scottish and Cornish ancestry, Irving frequently wrote about old New York (New Amsterdam) and the Hudson Valley under the original Dutch settlers, at first by creating a literary persona, the fictional Dutchman “Diedrich Knickerbocker.” His most famous work, The Sketch-Bookof Geoffrey Crayon (1819‒20), purportedly by another persona, contained the famous “Rip ...
The Photographic Album
The Photographic Album is an album of portraits by the famous American photographer Matthew Brady (circa 1823‒96) that belonged to Emperor Pedro II of Brazil (1825‒91), a collector of photography as well as a photographer himself. The album was a gift to the emperor from Edward Anthony (1818‒88), another early American photographer who, in partnership with his brother, owned a company that in the 1850s became the leading seller of photographic supplies in the United States. Dom Pedro may have acquired the album during a trip to ...
Caleb Cushing
Caleb Cushing (1800‒1879) was born in Salisbury, Massachusetts, the son of a shipmaster and merchant. In 1802 he moved with his family to Newburyport, Massachusetts, a town with which he had a lifelong association. He was educated at Harvard College and Harvard Law School, practiced law, wrote several books, and became a close associate of Daniel Webster, a prominent lawyer and future secretary of state. After several unsuccessful tries, Cushing was elected to the U.S. Congress in 1834, where he served four terms. In 1843‒44 he undertook ...
Secretary of War Simon Cameron
Simon Cameron (1799‒1889) was a Pennsylvania newspaper editor and politician who served as the first secretary of war in the cabinet of President Abraham Lincoln. He was born in Maytown, Pennsylvania and orphaned at age nine. Despite limited education, he gained a position as an apprentice printer and gradually rose to become editor of the Bucks County Messenger. Using his position in the press as a springboard, he became active in Pennsylvania state politics and served in the United States Senate from 1845 to 1849. Originally a Democrat, he ...
Minister to Mexico Thomas Corwin
Thomas Corwin (1794–1865) was a politician who was famous for his opposition to the Mexican War (1846–48). He was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, and raised on his family’s farm in Lebanon, Ohio, from 1798. He practiced law in Ohio and was twice elected as state representative. He joined the Whig party in 1830 and was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives for five consecutive terms, where he consistently supported the fiscal policies of Henry Clay. He was dubbed “the Wagon Boy” and “the Terror ...
Minister to Russia Cassius Marcellus Clay
Cassius Marcellus Clay (1810–1903) was an American diplomat and Union general in the American Civil War. Born in White Hall, Kentucky, he graduated from Yale College and served in the Mexican War (1846–48). He was a staunch abolitionist and reformer from the South who often had to defend his life and assets against threats by slaveholding interests. During the Civil War, he served as the U.S. minister to Russia from 1861 to 1862 and again from 1863 to 1869. He is credited with gaining Russian support for ...
British Minister to the United States Richard Lyons
Richard Bickerton Pemell Lyons (1817–87) was a British naval officer and diplomat. He was the British minister in Washington, DC, during the American Civil War. He is most famous for conducting the negotiations between the United States and Great Britain during the Trent affair, which in 1861 nearly brought war between the two countries. Confederate diplomats James Murray Mason and John Slidell were on their way to Europe aboard the British mail steamer Trent when the ship was intercepted by U.S. naval forces. Mason and Slidell were detained ...