6 results in English
Captain Fracasse
Capitaine Fracasse (Captain Fracasse) is a novel by Théophile Gautier (1811−72), the title character of which is a brash, loudmouthed swaggerer. The novel recounts the adventures of the baron of Sigognac during the reign of Louis XIII, a penniless nobleman who, taking on the role of the braggart Matamore, leaves his decaying castle to join a traveling theatrical troupe out of love for a young actress. The novel includes all the main characteristics of the typical roman de cape et d’épée (swashbuckling romance) made popular by Walter Scott ...
Robinson the Younger. For the Pleasurable and Useful Entertainment of Children
In 1720, just a year after its original publication in London, the first German translation of Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe was published. The work soon became widely popular. Only a few years later, German “robinsonades,” imitation versions of Defoe’s novel of shipwreck and survival, appeared on the market. The theologian, educator, and writer Joachim Heinrich Campe produced a two-volume adaptation of Defoe’s original book entitled Robinson der Jüngere (Robinson the younger). The book, published in 1779 (volume one) and 1780 (volume two), was aimed at children between ...
Thousand and One Nights. Now First Completely Done into English Prose and Verse
Shown here is the nine-volume edition of Alf laylah wa-laylah (Thousand and one nights), known in the West as the Arabian Nights, translated by British poet John Payne (1842−1916) and privately published by the Villon Society in London in 1882−84. The tales that form the Arabian Nights have their roots many centuries ago in oral storytelling, mystical stories, and folk tales from Persia, Baghdad, Cairo, and India, which were spread by merchants and other travelers on the major trade routes of the East from the ninth century onward ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha
In 1829, the Spanish scholar and bibliographer Vicente Salvá determined that this book was the true editio princeps (first printed edition) of the first volume of El ingenioso hidalgo don Quixote de la Mancha (The ingenious gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha). Until then, it had been considered a second edition, printed in the same year. Encouraged by the success of other fictional works, such as Mateo Alemán’s Guzmán de Alfarache (The life of Guzman de Alfarache), Francisco de Robles, printer to the king, bought the rights to publish ...
Contributed by National Library of Spain
Amadis of Gaul
Amadís de Gaula (Amadis of Gaul) is a famous prose romance of chivalry, first composed in Spain or Portugal and most likely based on French sources. An early version of the work probably existed by the late 13th century or early 14th century. A version in three books, of which brief fragments are extant, can be dated around 1420. Garci Rodriguez de Montalvo, ruler of Medina del Campo, reworked that version, added a fourth book, and continued with a fifth, entitled Las sergas de Esplandián (The adventures of Esplandian). The ...
Contributed by National Library of Spain
Amadis of Gaul
Amadís de Gaula (Amadis of Gaul) belongs to the genre of chivalric romances written in Spain in the late 15th century and the first half of the 16th century, often based on French sources. They are characterized as imaginative works of illusion, filled with wonders and enchantments. The Amadís of the National Library of Colombia is a beautiful volume of 600 pages (more than 1,500 pages in today's editions), printed in two columns in gothic type. It is illustrated with numerous woodcuts covering a wide variety of ...