10 results in English
Detailed Map of the Country of Chōsen
This Japanese map of Korea, published in Tokyo in 1873, is one of the earliest complete maps of the peninsula produced in Japan during the Meiji period (1868‒1912). It draws on earlier maps and was edited by Nobufusa Somezaki (1818‒86), also known as Shunsui Tamenaga, Junior, a gesakusha (writer of entertaining fiction) and journalist. The map appears to have been included in Tamenaga’s two-volume Chōsen jijō (Korean affairs) published in 1874, for which Neisai Ishizuka is credited as a co-author. Chōsen and Chosŏn are, respectively, the Japanese ...
Map of Central America, 1856
This 1856 map of Central America was created by the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, based on information provided by the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and edited and printed by the New York mapmaker and publisher Adolphus Ranney (1824‒74). It shows the extreme southern part of Mexico and the six countries of Central America: Guatemala, Honduras, San Salvador (El Salvador), Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and the Mosquito Coast (later British Honduras, today Belize). Panama is still part of Colombia, which at this time is called New Granada ...
The Kingdom of Ireland, Divided as Much into the Main Regions of Ulster, Connacht, Leinster and Munster
This hand-colored map of Ireland was published in 1715 by the firm of Nuremberg engraver and publisher Johann Baptist Homann (1663–1724). It is based on earlier works by Nicolaes Visscher (1649-1702), of the second of three generations of Visschers who were art dealers and map publishers in Amsterdam, and Sir William Petty (1623–87), the pioneering English political economist who directed the nationwide cadastral survey of Ireland carried out under Oliver Cromwell in 1656–58. The map is in Latin, but place-names are in English and the original Celtic ...
The Province of Ulster Surveyed by Sir William Petty
This map of Ulster (present-day Northern Ireland), published in London in 1689, is based on the Down Survey of Ireland undertaken in 1656–58. As indicated in the subtitle, the map shows the counties and baronies of the province, archbishoprics, cities, roads and bridges, and the distribution of seats in parliament. Relief is shown pictorially. The map has two distance scales, Irish miles and English miles. The Down Survey was the first detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world. Its purpose was to measure lands which ...
Connecticut, from the Best Authorities
This map of Connecticut first appeared in General Atlas for Carey’s Edition ofGuthrie’s Geography Improved, published in Philadelphia in 1795. The map was created “from the best authorities,” including information from William Blodget’s extraordinarily detailed map of 1791, the first official map of the state. Amos Doolittle (1754–1832), a copperplate engraver in New Haven, produced the map on a scale of 7.5 miles to one inch (12 kilometers to 2.4 centimeters). Largely self-taught, Doolittle was originally a jeweler and silversmith who first attempted ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Georgia, from the Latest Authorities
This map of Georgia first appeared in General Atlas for Carey’s Edition ofGuthrie’s Geography Improved, published in Philadelphia in 1795. It shows the state of Georgia extending through the present-day states of Alabama and Mississippi. The map stretches west to the Mississippi River, south into parts of Florida, northeast to South Carolina, and north to the “Tennassee Government.” The map notes the location of Indian tribes, including the Chacataws (Choctaws), Cherokees, Creeks, Natches (Natchez), and Seminoles. The map is the first to identify Georgia’s counties. Tallahassee ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Map of Kentucky from Actual Survey
Kentucky was admitted to the Union on June 1, 1792, becoming the 15th state of the United States. In 1793, Elihu Barker created the most accurate map of Kentucky up to that date, A Map of Kentucky from Actual Survey. The map includes Kentucky as well as the bordering “North Western Territory,” Virginia, and the “Tennassee Government.” It shows the mountains of eastern Kentucky and those between the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers in western Kentucky and indicates salt licks throughout the state as well as principal trails, towns, and settlements ...
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The State of New Hampshire. Compiled Chiefly from Actual Surveys
This map of New Hampshire was completed in 1794 by Samuel Lewis (1753 or 1754–1822), a Philadelphia draftsman and engraver, for inclusion in General Atlas for Carey’s Edition ofGuthrie’s Geography Improved, published in Philadelphia in 1795. It shows the five counties of New Hampshire‒Cheshire, Grafton, Hillsborough, Rockingham, and Stratford‒with their boundaries, principal towns and settlements, roads and waterways, mountains, and islands. Much of the map’s northern region is blank, with a note across the top, “Indian carrying place” (canoe portage). Lewis identifies the ...
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The State of New Jersey, Compiled from the Most Authentic Information
This map of New Jersey appeared in General Atlas for Carey’s Edition ofGuthrie’s Geography Improved, published in Philadelphia in 1795. The map extends from the Delaware River to the Atlantic Ocean and indicates the state’s principal towns, roads, and counties, as well as mountains, rivers, and the bordering states of New York, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. The map shows the counties of Bergen, Burlington, Cape May, Cumberland, Essex, Gloucester, Hunterdon, Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, Salem, Somerset, and Sussex. The map was engraved in 1795 by William Barker (active ...
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An Accurate Map of North and South Carolina, with Their Indian Frontier
This hand-colored map of the Carolinas dating from 1775 is known as the “Mouzon map.” Henry Mouzon (circa 1741–circa 1807), mapmaker and civil engineer of Saint Stephen’s Parish, was appointed by Governor Lord Charles Greville Montague to survey South Carolina in 1771. Mouzon’s map is more detailed and accurate than any previous map of the Carolinas. Extending from the Atlantic Ocean westward to the Appalachian Mountains, the map was based on James Cook’s 1773 map of South Carolina and John Collet’s 1770 map of North ...
Contributed by Library of Congress