October 27, 2016

Kābul, Number 287, Volume 21, Issue 2, April 22, 1951

Kābul was a monthly periodical of the Anjuman-i Adabi Kabul (Kabul Literary Society), first issued on December 15, 1931. It published original and translated works, often short or longer essays dealing with the history, archaeology, literature, culture, languages, and society of Afghanistan. It also published news reports relating to both national and international events. In its first year, the magazine was printed in 40 to 60 pages per issue. This later grew to around 80‒120 pages per issue. The contributors to the magazine included such Afghan literary-nationalist writers as Qari ʻAbd Allah (1871–1944), Mir Ghulam Mohammad Ghubar (1895–1978), Ahmad ʻAli Kuhzad (born 1907), ʻAbd al-Hayy Habibi (1910–84), and others who played critical roles in the historicization and characterization of Afghan identity in the 20th century. Between 1931 and 1938 Kābul published only Persian material within the framework of Anjuman-i Adabi Kabul. It later branched into two separate publications and became a Pushto magazine, while continuing to publish a Persian edition. Pushto Tolanah (The Pushto Society), established in 1939 to promote Pushto-Afghan history, literature, and language, took charge of the Pushto edition within the organization of the newly-formed governmental media department, Riyasat-i Mustaqil-i Matbu’at (Autonomous Directorate of Publications). The magazine was one of the oldest and most popular publications to appear under the royal regime in Afghanistan. After the communists came to power in 1979 and the country descended into conflict and political instability, the magazine was no longer published in a stable and continuous manner. Presented here are 375 issues of the magazine from between 1933 and 1964, from the collections of the Library of Congress.

Kābul, Number 210, Volume 17, Issue 18, February 5, 1948

Kābul was a monthly periodical of the Anjuman-i Adabi Kabul (Kabul Literary Society), first issued on December 15, 1931. It published original and translated works, often short or longer essays dealing with the history, archaeology, literature, culture, languages, and society of Afghanistan. It also published news reports relating to both national and international events. In its first year, the magazine was printed in 40 to 60 pages per issue. This later grew to around 80‒120 pages per issue. The contributors to the magazine included such Afghan literary-nationalist writers as Qari ʻAbd Allah (1871–1944), Mir Ghulam Mohammad Ghubar (1895–1978), Ahmad ʻAli Kuhzad (born 1907), ʻAbd al-Hayy Habibi (1910–84), and others who played critical roles in the historicization and characterization of Afghan identity in the 20th century. Between 1931 and 1938 Kābul published only Persian material within the framework of Anjuman-i Adabi Kabul. It later branched into two separate publications and became a Pushto magazine, while continuing to publish a Persian edition. Pushto Tolanah (The Pushto Society), established in 1939 to promote Pushto-Afghan history, literature, and language, took charge of the Pushto edition within the organization of the newly-formed governmental media department, Riyasat-i Mustaqil-i Matbu’at (Autonomous Directorate of Publications). The magazine was one of the oldest and most popular publications to appear under the royal regime in Afghanistan. After the communists came to power in 1979 and the country descended into conflict and political instability, the magazine was no longer published in a stable and continuous manner. Presented here are 375 issues of the magazine from between 1933 and 1964, from the collections of the Library of Congress.

Kābul, Number 213, Volume 17, Issue 21, March 6, 1948

Kābul was a monthly periodical of the Anjuman-i Adabi Kabul (Kabul Literary Society), first issued on December 15, 1931. It published original and translated works, often short or longer essays dealing with the history, archaeology, literature, culture, languages, and society of Afghanistan. It also published news reports relating to both national and international events. In its first year, the magazine was printed in 40 to 60 pages per issue. This later grew to around 80‒120 pages per issue. The contributors to the magazine included such Afghan literary-nationalist writers as Qari ʻAbd Allah (1871–1944), Mir Ghulam Mohammad Ghubar (1895–1978), Ahmad ʻAli Kuhzad (born 1907), ʻAbd al-Hayy Habibi (1910–84), and others who played critical roles in the historicization and characterization of Afghan identity in the 20th century. Between 1931 and 1938 Kābul published only Persian material within the framework of Anjuman-i Adabi Kabul. It later branched into two separate publications and became a Pushto magazine, while continuing to publish a Persian edition. Pushto Tolanah (The Pushto Society), established in 1939 to promote Pushto-Afghan history, literature, and language, took charge of the Pushto edition within the organization of the newly-formed governmental media department, Riyasat-i Mustaqil-i Matbu’at (Autonomous Directorate of Publications). The magazine was one of the oldest and most popular publications to appear under the royal regime in Afghanistan. After the communists came to power in 1979 and the country descended into conflict and political instability, the magazine was no longer published in a stable and continuous manner. Presented here are 375 issues of the magazine from between 1933 and 1964, from the collections of the Library of Congress.

The Expedition into Affghanistan: Notes and Sketches Descriptive of the Country, Contained in a Personal Narrative during the Campaign of 1839 & 1840, up to the Surrender of Dost Mahomed Khan

James Atkinson (1780–1852) was a man of many talents, best known for his early translations into English of Persian poetry and prose. He was born in England and studied medicine in London and Edinburgh. He was appointed an assistant surgeon in the Bengal service of the East India Company in 1805, and spent most of the rest of his life in India. In his spare time he mastered Persian, and by 1814 he had published a translation of part of the Shahnamah (Book of kings), the first time the Persian epic was made accessible to an English audience. In 1838 Atkinson was appointed chief surgeon of the Army of the Indus, and in that capacity he accompanied the army on its march to Kabul in the First Anglo-Afghan War (1839–42). The Expedition into Affghanistan: Notes and Sketches Descriptive of the Country, published in London in 1842, is Atkinson’s account of the war. It begins with a chapter on the causes of the expedition (the perceived Russian threat to Afghanistan and by extension to India), which is followed by a history of Shah Shujaʻ and of the Durrani dynasty. Subsequent chapters describe the advance of the army to the Indus, to Kandahar, the march from Kandahar to Ghazni, the capture of Kabul, and the march to Jalalabad. Atkinson returned to Bengal in 1841 and thus escaped the disaster that befell the Anglo-Indian army of occupation the following year, when Afghan tribesmen annihilated the Kabul garrison, a British and Indian force of 4,500 men. Atkinson was a talented artist who, in the same year in which this book appeared, published a book of lithographs entitled Sketches in Afghaunistan, based on drawings he made in Afghanistan. Atkinson also published translations of Italian verse and wrote a medical treatise on the bladder. He is regarded as a pioneer of oriental research who helped to make Persian and Afghan culture better known in Britain and beyond.