November 20, 2015

Beethoven’s Symphony Number 9 in D Minor, Opus 125

No other symphonic composition has met with such a broad and complex reception as Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphony Number 9 in D minor, opus 125, popularly known as the Choral Symphony. The work marked an important development in 19th century music. In the finale, Beethoven set to music the German poet Friedrich von Schiller’s An die Freude (Ode to joy), the first time the human voice was included in a symphonic work. The symphony was first performed in Vienna on May 7, 1824. Its influence ever since has extended far beyond the field of music. The work has inspired poets, writers, and visual artists, and it has provoked aesthetic and philosophical argument and discussion. Above all, the symphony has at all times proclaimed to people of good will its message of joy and the global brotherhood of humanity. Composers influenced by the work have included Schubert, Berlioz, Brahms, Wagner, Bruckner, Mahler, and many others. The autograph score of Beethoven's Ninth is held, almost in its entirety, in the music department of Berlin State Library–Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation. Some sheets from the score that were removed in the 19th century are held at the Beethoven-Haus in Bonn and in the National Library of France in Paris. The original score of the symphony was added to the UNESCO Memory of the World register in 2001, where it joins other outstanding monuments to the spiritual heritage of mankind.

One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: A Glimpse of the Moon - Kaoyo

This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints from Tsuki hyakushi and two indexes that were created after the series was completed. It is believed to have been bound by its former owner. A preface that was written at the same time as the indexes were compiled is not included in the book. Scholars believe that the order of the pictures in the album does not follow the order in which they were published, but instead their order in the indexes, although there are some variations. Tsukioka Yoshitoshi was an ukiyo-e artist from the school of Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797–1861), active from the Bakumatsu (final years of the Shogunate) into the Meiji Period. He created a wide range of works, including bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women), fuzoku-ga (pictures of manners and customs), and pictures of historical and literary characters. Completed in the year that he died, this series is highly regarded as the masterpiece of his later years.

One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: Cloth-Beating Moon - Yūgiri

This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints from Tsuki hyakushi and two indexes that were created after the series was completed. It is believed to have been bound by its former owner. A preface that was written at the same time as the indexes were compiled is not included in the book. Scholars believe that the order of the pictures in the album does not follow the order in which they were published, but instead their order in the indexes, although there are some variations. Tsukioka Yoshitoshi was an ukiyo-e artist from the school of Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797–1861), active from the Bakumatsu (final years of the Shogunate) into the Meiji Period. He created a wide range of works, including bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women), fuzoku-ga (pictures of manners and customs), and pictures of historical and literary characters. Completed in the year that he died, this series is highly regarded as the masterpiece of his later years.

One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: In the Midst of Glimmering Whiteness/ Among the Night's Moon-Shadows/ I Part the Snow and Pluck Plum Blossoms - Kintō

This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints from Tsuki hyakushi and two indexes that were created after the series was completed. It is believed to have been bound by its former owner. A preface that was written at the same time as the indexes were compiled is not included in the book. Scholars believe that the order of the pictures in the album does not follow the order in which they were published, but instead their order in the indexes, although there are some variations. Tsukioka Yoshitoshi was an ukiyo-e artist from the school of Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797–1861), active from the Bakumatsu (final years of the Shogunate) into the Meiji Period. He created a wide range of works, including bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women), fuzoku-ga (pictures of manners and customs), and pictures of historical and literary characters. Completed in the year that he died, this series is highly regarded as the masterpiece of his later years.

One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: Moon of Itsukushima - A Muro Courtesan

This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints from Tsuki hyakushi and two indexes that were created after the series was completed. It is believed to have been bound by its former owner. A preface that was written at the same time as the indexes were compiled is not included in the book. Scholars believe that the order of the pictures in the album does not follow the order in which they were published, but instead their order in the indexes, although there are some variations. Tsukioka Yoshitoshi was an ukiyo-e artist from the school of Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797–1861), active from the Bakumatsu (final years of the Shogunate) into the Meiji Period. He created a wide range of works, including bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women), fuzoku-ga (pictures of manners and customs), and pictures of historical and literary characters. Completed in the year that he died, this series is highly regarded as the masterpiece of his later years.

One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: The Night is Still and a Hundred Flowers are Fragrant in the Western Palace/ She Orders the Screen to be Rolled up, Regretting the Passing of Spring/ With the Yunhe across her Lap she Gazes at the Moon/ The Colors of the Trees are Hazy in the Indistinct Moonlight - Wang Changling

This print is from Tsuki hyakushi (One hundred aspects of the moon), a collection of 100 large, moon-themed nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock prints) by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839−92). The prints were published in batches by Akiyama Buemon between 1885 and 1892. They depict various aspects of the moon, drawing upon Japanese and Chinese anecdotes, historical events, and mythology, and relate to a wide range of subjects, including famous warriors, notable women, birds and animals, and goblins and ghosts. The print is contained in a folding book consisting of all 100 prints from Tsuki hyakushi and two indexes that were created after the series was completed. It is believed to have been bound by its former owner. A preface that was written at the same time as the indexes were compiled is not included in the book. Scholars believe that the order of the pictures in the album does not follow the order in which they were published, but instead their order in the indexes, although there are some variations. Tsukioka Yoshitoshi was an ukiyo-e artist from the school of Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797–1861), active from the Bakumatsu (final years of the Shogunate) into the Meiji Period. He created a wide range of works, including bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women), fuzoku-ga (pictures of manners and customs), and pictures of historical and literary characters. Completed in the year that he died, this series is highly regarded as the masterpiece of his later years.