October 7, 2014

Penn Steam Engine and Boiler Works. Foot of Palmer Street, Kensington, Philadelphia. Reaney, Neafie and Company Engineers, Machinists, Boiler Makers, Black Smiths and Founders

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows vessels docked in front of the engine and boiler works complex at the foot of Palmer Street on the busy Delaware River. Teams of several horses haul materials on trucks past the boiler works. Laborers work on the docks, piers, and boats at the complex. Docked vessels include the tugboats, steamboats, paddleboats, and a sailboat. The firm was established as Reaney, Neafie & Smith in 1844, with Levy becoming a partner in 1845 on the death of Smith. It specialized in iron boats and engines and later steam-powered fire engines. Reaney left the partnership to start his own shipyard in 1859. Neafie & Levy remained in operation until 1907. The company became known as Penn Steam Engine and Boiler Works because of its proximity to the site where William Penn was thought to have signed his treaty with the Lenape people. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Price and Harper's Steam Saw Mill, Fancy Chair Manufactory, and Lumber Yard, Girard Avenue, between Seventh and Eighth, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the four-story brick building and adjoining lumber yard on Girard Avenue above Seventh Street tenanted by Price & Harper. Signboards on the front facade read, "fancy-chair factory, steam sawmill, turning & scroll sawing, and iron foundry." Large piles of lumber are visible in the yard that extends west to Eighth Street from the factory building. A man leads a horse out of the yard, while horse-drawn carts, some pulling lumber, travel up the street in front of the building. A carriage and a man and woman travel south on Eighth Street. A bale of hay sits on the sidewalk near a lamppost and a stalled carriage in the foreground. Price & Harper were partners in 1853−55. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Rowley, Ashburner and Company's Oil, Alcohol, Fluid and Pine Oil Works. Kensington Screw Dock, Penn Street above Maiden, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the Kensington Screw Dock on North Penn Street above Maiden Street (later Laurel Street) from the Delaware River. Shipwrights work on the hull of a square-rigged ship raised in the dry dock in front of the firm's building. At the wharf, horse-drawn drays travel past the neighboring oil manufactory and distillery and a captain, with a dog, leans on a hitching post to which a tugboat is tied. In the rough water of the river, skiffs, sailboats, and a rowboat struggle against the choppy waves. The print also shows the neighboring oil manufactory and distillery, surrounding boathouses, wharves, and buildings lining the riverfront. Edward Rowley, Algernon Ashburner, and George B. Keen purchased the Kensington Screw Dock in 1850. They operated as commission merchants and also dealt in many different kinds of oils, materials for varnishes, spirits, and other provisions for shipwrights. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

A View of Point Airy Opposite South Street, Philadelphia

Louis (or Lewis) Haugg was born in 1827 in Germany, immigrated to the United States in 1847, and worked as a lithographic artist and printer in Philadelphia circa 1855−1900. This advertisement shows the Point Airy Hotel and dock operated by David Warren at the resort located on the southern end of Windmill Island, a summer resort area popular in the 19th century before the removal of the island in 1897 to allow passage for larger ships on the Delaware River. Trees surround the resort. In the foreground, a wide variety of river traffic including ferries, sailboats, and rowboats traverse the river. A man attired in a suit and top hat helps row one of the vessels. In the background, sailing ships and a ferry are visible in front of the New Jersey waterfront. From the mid-1850s through the 1860s, Haugg produced fashion plates, advertisements, and certificates. Most of these lithographs were printed by prominent local firms, and he was a partner in 1869−79 in the A.L. Weise & Company lithography establishment. Haugg's later lithographs have imprints indicating that he served as lithographer and printer, possibly with his own establishment.

Cornelius & Baker, 181 Cherry Street, Philadelphia. Manufacturers of Lamps, Gas Fixtures, Et cetera

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the multi-story factory on the 800 block of Cherry Street. A tower and American flag top the building, in which workers appear at some of the open windows. A number of horse-drawn vehicles are coming and going, including delivery wagons and, in the foreground, a carriage occupied by three gentlemen and drawn by two agitated horses that the driver attempts to settle. At the corner, a boy with a light fixture walks past a lamppost. Christian Cornelius, a Dutch immigrant silversmith, founded the Cornelius lighting business in 1827, which became Cornelius, Baker, and Company in 1835. By the 1850s, it operated the factory illustrated here, another on the 500 block of Columbia Avenue, and a store at 176 Chestnut Street. The firm began by making brass lighting fixtures but later also made zinc fixtures and sculptures, some of which were installed in the United States Capitol. The business was succeeded by Cornelius and Sons and Baker, Arnold and Company in 1869. William Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

William W. Clark, Drug and Chemical Warehouse, 16 North Fifth Street, Philadelphia. Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Glass, & Et cetera. Paint, Oil, and Glass, English, French, German, & Mediterranean Drugs

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the premises of William Clark, druggist, at 16 North Fifth Street. Signs advertise "Drugs, Paint, Oil, & Glass, English, French, German, & Mediterranean Drugs." Through the open entranceways of the business shelves of bottles on cabinets are visible lining the walls. A clerk reaches for one of the potions as a patron enters the store. Another clerk descends into the cellar in front of the building. Crates and barrels of elixir, drugs, and paint marked with delivery addresses line the sidewalk across from a horse-drawn dray parked in the street. Bottles, decanters, jugs, and boxes fill the central display window and upper windows. An oversize model of a mortar and pestle is displayed above the entrances. Clark operated from the address in 1839−53. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.