October 7, 2014

Warnick & Leibrandt's Philadelphia Stove Works and Hollow-Ware Foundry. First Wharf above Noble Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows two views of the stove works and hollow-ware foundries owned and operated by Charles W. Warnick and Frederick Leibrandt. The upper scene depicts the stove works at Gunners Run (later the Aramingo Canal) and Franklin Avenue (later Girard Avenue). Viewed from the opposite bank of Gunner's Run, the scene shows laborers with horse-drawn carts and drays on the bank of the canal, in front of a complex of industrial buildings. In the foreground, laborers lift a large plank of wood, and men in groups of three move materials across the canal in rowboats. A sailing ship is docked at left and smaller vessels are on the canal. The bottom winter scene depicts the stove works looking northeast at the Noble Street Wharf (at the northeast corner of Beach and Noble Streets), showing horse-drawn traffic in the snow-covered street outside the company's large brick building. Also seen are horse-drawn sleds, a speeding horse-drawn sleigh carrying a family of four, Warnick & Leibrandt covered wagons (center), and children playing with a dog and sleds on North Beach Street in the foreground. Bare masts are visible on the Delaware River behind the company's building. The Noble Street Wharf site later became home to the Philadelphia Sugar House. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Bennett & Company, Tower Hall Clothing Bazaar, Number 182 Market Street, between Fifth and Sixth Streets, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the tower-shaped clothing store at 182 (later 518) Market Street. Statuary and a flag reading "Tower Hall" embellish the building and signs advertise "Quick Sales" and "Small Profits." A clerk consults with a patron before the store, and other patrons can be seen inside. Coats, piles, or racks of clothing fill the store. Crates line the sidewalk; some are labeled to go to Independence, Montana; Nashville, Tennessee; and Augusta, Georgia. The smaller Clothing Ware Rooms building stands adjacent to Tower Hall, its signs advertising shirts, collars, bosoms, cravats, wrappers, hosiery, and handkerchiefs. "Allman Hatter" and "Winchester Grocer" signs also appear on the facade. A laborer loads a Bennett & Company Tower Hall Clothing Bazaar wagon. A trompe l'oeil wood frame borders the image. Colonel Joseph M. Bennett (1816−98) established his business at this address in 1849. In 1853 he renamed it Tower Hall. Bennett was a successful businessman who used his wealth for philanthropic pursuits, including the establishment of a Methodist orphanage and the bequest of West Philadelphia properties to the University of Pennsylvania in support of women's education. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Neall & Matthews, Iron Founders and Machinists, Bush Hill Iron Works

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the Bush Hill Iron Works, originally established by Oliver Evans in 1809 and operated by Neall, Matthews, and Moore in 1846−54, on the plot of land that is now between Buttonwood and Spring Garden Streets, facing 16th Street. The bustling complex has grounds littered with cylinders, tubes, castings, and a pile of coal around which several laborers toil. The workers transport machinery by horse-drawn cart, hoist cylinders onto a dray, hammer castings, push handcarts, fuel the furnace, and labor in the workshops. Text in Spanish, English, and French below the image promotes the products of the works, including cylinders, steam engines, boilers, mills, pans, hammers, anvils, and castings. The text also notes the two air furnaces at the works, able to fill roll orders "without delay," and proclaims "all orders for machinery or castings thankfully received and promptly executed." James Neal retired in 1854, and Matthew and Moore carried on the business until 1870, when James Moore assumed sole proprietorship. The iron works constructed machinery for some of the leading rolling mills of the United States during the 19th century and, as indicated by the text, also had an export business. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

P. R. Schuyler, Furnishing Undertaker, Philadelphia. Northeast Corner of Beaver & 4th Streets, Philadelphia. Lots for Sale in Monument Cemetery on Reasonable Terms. Also Single Interments

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows a funeral procession led by an empty hearse passing by the residential business front of undertaker P.R. Schuyler on the northeast corner of Beaver and Fourth Streets. A sign with the name of the proprietor and illustrated with a coffin stands in the arbor adjacent to the building. Trees line the sidewalk on which a lady holding a parasol strolls by. She precedes the first (and fully visible) horse-drawn carriage in the procession on the cobblestone street. The hearse driver wears mourning attire including a top hat with ribbon. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Philadelphia Horse & Carriage Bazaar, Southeast Corner of Ninth and George Streets, between Walnut and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows a view of Alfred M. Herkness' circular auction house on the 800 block of George Street (later Sansom Street). A man, possibly Herkness, stands in the doorway. Signs advertise the sale of horses, carriages, and harnesses, "twice every week." Harnesses are tacked along the doorway. Carriages, harnessed to horses and free-standing, line the streets, and men wait alongside the building. Also pictured are the neighboring Fifth Baptist Church, a man waiting on horseback, and a gentleman at the opposite street corner. The premises had room for 300 carriages and 150 horses. Originally erected for the exhibition of a cyclorama of Jerusalem, the building was acquired by Herkness in 1847−48. His business remained at this site until 1913; the building was demolished in 1915. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

W.P. Hacker, Importer and Wholesale Dealer in China, Glass, Queensware & Fancy Goods, Number 60, North Second Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the building tenanted by the china, glass, and queen’s ware (a cream-colored ceramic) business of William P. Hacker at 60 (later 108) North Second Street. Pitchers, vases, and bowls in various shapes and sizes are stacked on shelves and are also displayed in the storefront window, which is flanked by two wide doors. In the left doorway, a man lifts a barrel using a pulley system running all the way to the top floor of the building. Another worker loads hampers onto a horse-drawn dray. Barrels and hampers line the sidewalk and cobblestone street in front of the shop. The image also shows parts of adjacent properties, including the stairway at number 58 and casks (presumably of wine) at number 62. William P. Hacker moved his business to several nearby properties on North Second Street, starting out at 64, moving to 62, and then to 60 in 1851. Hacker was president of the Philadelphia Common Council from 1855 to 1856. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.