October 7, 2014

Potter & Carmichael, Oil Cloth Manufacturers. Warehouse, Number 135, North Third Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the busy factory complex on Second Street above the Reading Railroad (i.e., 135 North Third Street above Race Street). A "Franklin-ville, Oilcloth Works" sign tops the roof of the main factory building around which workers stretch cloth on long flat racks. Cloth is also stretched down the sides of buildings. Other men move a roll of carpet into a hatch, load materials into a wagon in the courtyard, and transport materials by handcart and horse-drawn dray. Behind the smaller building, men work in and around a shed. Countryside frames the scene. The firm of Potter & Carmichael moved their warehouse to 135 North Third Street from 568 North Third Street (above Poplar Street) circa 1848. The partnership was dissolved in 1853. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

T.I. Dyre, Jr., Bell & Brass Founder, Corner of Washington & Church Streets, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the Dyre foundry complex in South Philadelphia, including the "Black Lead Crucible Manufactory," "Brass & Bell Foundry," an office-like building, and a workshop with a stack spewing smoke. A gentleman enters the office as a laborer pushes a wheelbarrow on the sidewalk toward an alley, out of which a drayman leads his horse-drawn vehicle transporting a large bell. In the street, a crowded "Gray's Ferry" double-decker omnibus travels alongside a dog which has spooked the horses, and a man attempts to jump aboard the rear. A couple standing by a corner store and the surrounding buildings are also shown. By 1855 Dyre had relocated his foundry to Front Street. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

William P. Cresson's Foundry, Willow above Thirteenth Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the busy U-shaped iron foundry established circa 1846 at Willow Street (also known as James Street), above North 13th Street. Laborers work within the courtyard, at the entryways, and along the complex. In the courtyard, men work on and near a small raised platform in front of the smokestacks of a building with a steeply pitched roof. Stacks of flatbed crates line a small adjacent building across from men at work within the factory, and two men load a horse-drawn cart parked near stacks of lumber and an unhitched cart. In the foreground, a driver leads a two-horse team pulling a coal car down tracks curving into the courtyard, while an empty cart is seen departing on the right. Cresson’s business operated at site until about 1859. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

William H. Horstmann & Sons, Number 51, North Third Street, Philadelphia, Manufacturers and Importers of Military Goods

John Taylor French was born in Pennsylvania in 1822 and worked as a lithographer, particularly of fashion advertisements, in Philadelphia from about 1845 to 1852. This advertisement shows the ornately decorated storefront of William H. Horstmann & Sons clothing and military supply store. Patriotic bunting consisting of the names of J.H. Otten, carver, and J. Gibson, painter, and a shield surmounted by an eagle, flags, swords, and spears surround a sign that reads, "E Pluribus Unum, Horstmann," above the first level. Drums, military helmets, flags, and swords flank this central display. Laurel wreaths hang above the ornamental columns on each side of the shop's two doorways and two bay windows. Tassels are visible in the left bay window, while various types of military helmets are displayed in rows in the right window. Shields and crossed arrows adorn the transom lights above the windows and doors.  Horstmann & Sons produced and sold their wares at this location between 1830 and 1857, after which time they moved their factory operations to Fifth and Cherry Streets, and their storefront to a separate property at 223 Chestnut Street. French was first listed as a lithographer in Philadelphia directories in 1845. John T. French’s lithography was primarily produced in collaboration with Thomas Sinclair. Besides advertisements, his work included genre prints, landscapes, and book illustrations. His fashion prints, produced for S.A. & A.F. Ward and issued in the late 1840s, received particular praise.

Philadadelphia & New York Pekin Tea Company, North West Corner of Callowhill and Sixth Streets, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the Philadelphia store of the Pekin Tea Company heavily adorned with lettering on the 600 block of Callowhill Street. Through the open entrances, clerks are visible standing at counters in front of shelves of boxes of tea. Within the large display windows, Chinese figurines of men and women flank additional merchandise displays. Two patrons pass stacked boxes of tea near the entrances as they proceed into the storefront. Other foot traffic includes a couple on promenade and a man and woman, at opposite showcase windows, peering at the figurines. A larger Chinese male figure, holding a box of tea and standing on another one, adorns the second-floor corner of the building. Street signs displayed on two of the store’s window frames are visible on each side of the figure. Also shown are partial views of adjacent buildings, including part of a sign reading "[T]aylor's Room." The Pekin Tea Company was founded in New York in 1845 and operated this Philadelphia store in about 1847−51. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

S.F. Jacoby and Company. Importers and Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Marble in All Their Varieties. J.K. and M. Freedley Dealers in American Marble

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement contains a montage of three titled views showing the sites involved in the operations of the Jacoby and Freedley companies. The scenes are separated and surrounded by an ornate border, comprised of patriotic imagery on top, including an eagle clutching the American flag and shield near a bust of George Washington and the state seals of Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. Filigree, foliage, and tassels decorate the central portion, where putti hold up a banner displaying the title of the central view. A lion-mouth fountain adorns the bottom portion of the border. The upper view shows a train carrying marble at the Freedley "Bay State Marble Works in West Stockbridge, Mass," in front of houses and a bullock wagon. The busy central scene depicts slabs of marble on boats and piled on the wharf at the Chesnut [sic] Street Wharf on the Schuylkill River, Philadelphia, ready for finishing in nearby mills or to be sold by Jacoby. It includes vessels on the river, a partial view of the Market Street Permanent Bridge (left), and buildings near the river. The bottom scene shows slabs of marble lined on the bank and hoisted on canal boats to be transported to destinations across the country from the Key Stone Marble Works, Conshohocken, Pennsylvania. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.