October 7, 2014

Patent Improved Lead Pipe Sheet Lead and Composition Gas Tubes, Manufactured by Tatham & Brothers, Office 15 Minor Street, Philadelphia, and 249 Water Street, New York

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the factory complex at 608 Delaware Avenue (occupied in 1844) for the lead pipe factory established in Philadelphia in 1841 by George N., Henry B., and William P. Tatham. The business office was in Minor Street. Employees work in front of the industrial factory building that is covered with signage and at its wharf. Men lift a barrel with a hoist, guide horse-drawn drays into a courtyard and down an alley for unloading, move planks of wood, and spray a hose into the river. Tatham & Brothers, a firm established in New York in 1838, operated the Philadelphia factory on Delaware Avenue until circa 1867. The firm patented a hydraulic pressure method to produce pipe in 1841. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Thomas Minford Wholesale and Retail Grocery and Tea Warehouse, South West Corner of Second and Walnut Streets, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the premises of Thos. (Thomas) Minford, a southwest view of the three-story storefront and its signage, on the 200 block of Walnut Street. In front of the store, a female patron reaches into a sack, one of several sacks, crates, and canisters displayed near the open doorway. Within the store, a couple stands near rows of shelves. On the second floor, large, open panel doors expose the room lined with hay, revealing a barrel, crates, boxes of tea, and sacks. Brooms are stored in front of the third-floor windows. Two gentlemen converse on the side of the building. Minford tenanted the site in 1845−47 and later relocated to New York City. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Western Paper Hangings Establishment, 501 Market Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the four-story storefront of John Ward’s Western Paper Hangings, covered in signage on the 1300 block of Market Street near the corner of Oak Street. Signs advertise "Paper Hanging Wholesale & Retail" and "Cash Paid for Rags," a reminder that cotton rags from used clothing were the raw material of the best paper. Two male patrons enter the store as a lady departs with a scroll in her hand. Two other women, one with a girl, admire the displays of paper hangings in the showcase windows, including pictures of the Capitol building, a romantic genre scene, and still lifes. A man and a boy walk past the Oak Street side of the business. Ward tenanted the site in about 1847−49. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Penn Hotel & Denny's Harness Shop

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the building containing the hotel and tavern operated by John Thompson at 329 Market Street and Robert Denny's saddlery and harness store at 327½ Market Street. Harnesses and other horse paraphernalia hang above the shop's display window and entranceways, including a stable entrance marked "Entertainment for Horses." A man walks his horse through to the rear and a clerk from Denny's converses with a customer by a stack of trunks. A groom looks after a horse in front of the adjacent hardware store; another horse harnessed to a sulky is tended by an African American man. Hotel guests enter the building and can be seen through the open second-floor windows. The hotel and tavern business and the harness and saddlery store had adjacent premises only for the year 1848−49. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Philadelphia, from the State House Steeple, North, East and South

This lithograph is by Leo von Elliot (1816−90) after a sketch by Joseph Thoma. Little is known about either of these artists. The panoramic view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century looks east toward the Delaware River, predominantly showing the area east of Fifth Street between Arch and South Streets from the State House (Independence Hall). It includes the Court House (later City Hall, 500 Chestnut Street) and the Philadelphia Library (the Library Company of Philadelphia, 105 South Fifth Street). Also seen are a flag flying on top of the U.S. Bank (later the Second Bank of the United States, 420 Chestnut Street), the spires of Christ Church (22−34 North Second Street), and Saint Peter's Church (300−340 Pine Street). The print also shows part of the State House garden; the north side of the 500 block of Chestnut Street, including adjoined storefronts tenanted by the American Hotel (181−83 Chestnut Street); S.L. Simons daguerreotype rooms (179 Chestnut Street); George Earle's Pantechnethica (175 Chestnut Street); George J. Henkels' City Cabinet Wareroom (173 Chestnut Street); and a clothing store on the northwest corner of Fifth and Chestnut Streets. Also seen are rooftop views (including people on the roofs) of several of the surrounding city blocks, and a few pedestrians and a horse-drawn carriage on Chestnut Street. Sailboats and a steamboat are visible on the Delaware River in the distance, along with the horizon of Camden, New Jersey.

Melloy & Ford, Wholesale Tin Ware Manufacturers

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the factory operated by John M. Melloy and Robert Ford at 291 Market Street (later renumbered 723). It promotes the "lowest rates," "quick sales & small profits," and "metallic roofing." The building’s many signs and product advertisements include a large scale model of a coffeepot and prominent displays of tinware in the shop window, on the shelves, and by the door. In front of the shop, a couple strolls and two laborers lift a crate onto a horse-drawn dray, while a female customer enters the store. An African American peddler with tray and bell passes a line of crates on the sidewalk. Tinsmiths work near the third floor windows. Melloy & Ford were in business together from 1849 until 1861, when Melloy entered partnership with Isaac Smith at the same address. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.