October 7, 2014

A. H. Eckhardt Soap and Candle Manufactory, Number 326 North Second Street, Philadelphia

George G. Heiss was a mid-19th century Philadelphia lithographer, who specialized in views of fire-fighting equipment. This lithograph advertisement shows the storefront of the Eckhardt soap and candle business on the 500 block of North Second Street between Noble and Green Streets. A store clerk, or possibly the proprietor, stands at the doorway, a quill in one hand and the other resting on a stack of boxes. He watches a laborer load boxes onto the Eckhardt horse-drawn wagon. Boxes, jars, crates, and other containers fill the large display window. The store also has poles for an awning, a side awning reading "A.H. Eckhardt Soap & Candle Manufacturer," advertising signs at the doorway, and a fire-insurance marker. Augustus H. Eckhardt ran the chandler business here in 1848−56. Soaps and candles were often produced by the same business in the 19th century because their manufacture required many of the same raw materials. Heiss was born in Philadelphia in 1823. He exhibited at the Artists' Fund Society 1840−43 and was also known as a portrait painter. He worked closely with Thomas Wagner and James McGuigan’s lithography studio from 1847 to 1855, when he opened his own establishment at 213 North Second Street. From then until the early 1860s, he mainly lithographed and published views of fire-fighting engines for local volunteer companies. Heiss published The Illustrated National Alphabet illustrated with lithographs in 1865. He left lithography in 1868 and established an artists’ materials emporium at 25 North 11th Street, which he operated until about 1885.

P. Maison's Biscuit Bakery, 134 North Front Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the busy three-story bakery at 134 (later 214) North Front Street. Banners attached to the building swing out to awning posts to proclaim "P. Maison's Bakery 134." Another "Bakery" sign extends over the adjacent alley between the business and the neighboring building. A gentleman, possibly the proprietor, stands at the entrance of the building as laborers transport and stack barrels at the open entryway and upper receiving windows. In front of the store, a "P. Maison Biscuit Bakery" wagon is loaded with barrels next to a dray that is also laden with goods. At the side of the building, a driver atop a horse-drawn cart loaded with barrels confers with a colleague leaning from an upper window. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Public Baths. Thomas E. J. Kerrison's Arcade-Baths

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the public bathhouse, originally built 1826−27 as a gallery of shops after the designs of John Haviland at 615−19 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Patrons enter through arches to the interior of the arcade, which has stairs over a central enclosed space that is flanked by corridors of rooms. The front facade also contains statuary and advertising signs in two niches above gated cellar entrances to "D. Gibb, Franklin House." The signs promote the tenant oyster house. A boy posts a broadside on the building and people pass by on the sidewalk. Kerrison operated the baths in 1845−49. The building was demolished in about 1859−60. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Robert Wood's Steam Iron Railing Works, Ridge Road Above Buttonwood Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the long and narrow steam-powered iron railing works on the 1100 block of Ridge Road owned by Robert Wood. Signboards on the facade advertise "Wood's steam iron railing manufactory, all kinds of ornamental & architectural iron work made to order" and "manufacturer of iron railings for cemeteries." Laborers are visible through the open windows and doors on all levels of the factory. Two men carry an iron piece into the building past a display of ornamental iron sculpture, which includes a large lyre. Workers in the street load and unload iron railings and bars. A crowded Girard College & Exchange line omnibus traveling north on Ridge Road has stopped by the factory, and children play on a makeshift seesaw alongside. The image is surrounded by a border of iron-work models; at the base are steps with ornate iron railings and a grand ornamental gateway. Wood’s firm was the largest supplier of sculptural and ornate ironwork to the Laurel Hill Cemetery in the mid-19th century. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Savery and Company Iron Hollow Ware Foundry

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the multiple buildings of the foundry established in 1841 on the 1400 block of South Front Street near Reed Street, which operated there until the late 19th century. The buildings, most with smokestacks, include an office, sheds, and shops. Foundry employees exit and enter the buildings, pile wood, lead horse-drawn carts and drays into and out of the small complex, and move cauldrons lining the sidewalk. The firm specialized in pots, pan, kettles, and other housewares in addition to agricultural implements. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

T. E. Chapman, Book Store and Book Bindery, 74 North Fourth Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the premises on the 100 block of North Fourth Street of the bookseller, binder, and publisher Thomas Ellwood Chapman. A male patron enters the store. A small broadside hangs in the door window, bundles of fibrous material rest atop the mantle, and shelves of books are visible lining the wall. A woman in the street stands to the side of the cellar doors closely examining the window display. A sign reading "rags bought" is a reminder that cotton rags from used clothing were the raw material of the best paper. The wooden door in the building facade possibly leads to an alleyway. Chapman opened the bookstore here in 1840, added the bindery in 1843, and relocated in 1849. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.