October 7, 2014

N. Helverson, Undertaker, 93 Coates Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the office building and storefront for the undertaker and "Coffin Ware-House" at 93 Coates Street (later 225−27 Fairmount Avenue). A male patron enters the doorway of the office "N. Helverson Undertaker." A sign advertising "Coffins Ready Made" adorns the showcase window. A doormat covers the small step preceding the entrance and the cellar doors to the building are open. In the right, a woman appears interested in a display at the adjacent store, which is out of view. At the warehouse, workers haul coffins near the open doorway of the four-story building. A sign illustrated with a coffin is displayed in the first-floor window and workers are visible at two open windows above. A tree stands in front of the building and two horses hitched to a hearse parked in the street stand in its shade. The hearse is adorned with bunting, drapery, and fringe. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Robert Shoemaker's Wholesale and Retail Drugstore, Southwest Corner of Second and Green Streets, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is Shoemaker’s drugstore on the 200 block of Green Street. Signs advertise Wetherill's white lead, drugs, medicines, paints, oils, glass, dyestuffs, "window glass of all sizes," picture glass, "cheap glass for hot beds," "white lead warranted pure by the ton or pound," ready-mixed paints, linseed oil, plasters, potash, and soda. A patron enters past barrels and sacks. Two clerks stand at the long counter before shelves of pharmaceuticals. Canisters and apothecary jars fill the main windows. At the street corner, crates and boxes of pharmaceuticals, including indigo and oil of vitriol (sulfuric acid), line the sidewalk and some are loaded on a horse-drawn dray. Shoemaker operated the drugstore under this name and at this location in 1837−56, having apprenticed at the store in the 1830s when it was operated by William Scattergood. Shoemaker developed an alternative to homemade plasters and was possibly the first U.S. manufacturer of glycerin. He removed to Fourth and Race Streets in 1856 when he established Robert Shoemaker & Company. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

T. Wattson and Sons, Biscuit Bakery, 129 North Front Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the busy four-story factory for the bakery at 129 North Front Street, between Chestnut and Walnut Streets. A gentleman, possibly the proprietor Thomas Wattson, stands in one of the open doorways to the bakery as laborers work around him. Near the doorways, workers load kegs onto a horse-drawn "T. Wattson & Sons Biscuit Bakery" wagon and dray. Other men hoist kegs to the upper receiving windows from the sidewalk. Some of the windows reveal men at work, stacks of barrels, and kegs being hammered shut or moved about. The X-shaped anchor plates, as seen at the front left, were connected to interior joint bolts to reinforce the structure of buildings. Thomas Wattson established his business at this address in 1846 and sold it to his son-in-law in 1852, who renamed it Wattson & Company. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Womrath and Neville, Manufactory of Fringes, Tassels, Cords & c. and George F. Womrath, Fur Store, 15 and 13 North Fourth Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows two adjoining storefronts adorned with signage and display windows on North Fourth Street above Market Street. At number 15, the Womrath & Neville storefront, a clerk is visible helping a female patron. Shelves of merchandise line the wall behind him. Fringes, tassels, and other trimmings, a framed graphic, and a small broadside fill the main windows marked "Hosiery," "Trimmings," "Bindings," and "Tapes & Thread." Between the stores, a lady and a girl stand on the sidewalk, and the girl points at a fur piece in the window of number 13, the George F. Womrath Fur Store. A couple enters the building past a stack of wrapped bundles and packages and fur muffs and skins displayed near the entry. More fur muffs and stoles fill the showcase window. Two packages of "Bear Skins" line the sidewalk. Womrath and Neville partnered here in 1846−49. Womrath established his fur business in 1829. Rease became active in the lithography trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

John Bancroft, Jr., Soap and Candle Manufactory, 19 Wood Street between Second & Third Streets & Vine & Callowhill Streets, Philadelphia

George G. Heiss was a mid-19th century Philadelphia lithographer, who specialized in views of fire-fighting equipment. This print advertises John Bancroft’s soap and candle business on the 200 block of Wood Street, Philadelphia. Signs reading "Steam Soap & Candle Manufactory" and "John Bancroft Jr." adorn the factory (left) and smaller adjoining office building (right). A clerk writing in an account book stands at the doorway of the office in which another clerk is visible through a window. Near the adjacent arched alleyway to the rear courtyard a boy carries a box on his shoulder and laborers hoist boxes from a receiving window to the long Bancroft wagon parked on the cobblestone street. Boxes and molds are piled by the upper windows. The factory has a second arched alley, cellar doors, a fire insurance marker, and smokestacks spewing smoke. Heiss was born in Philadelphia in 1823. He exhibited at the Artists' Fund Society 1840−43 and was also known as a portrait painter. He worked closely with Thomas Wagner and James McGuigan’s lithography studio from 1847 until 1855, when he opened his own establishment at 213 North Second Street. From then until the early 1860s, he mainly lithographed and published views of fire-fighting engines for local volunteer companies. Heiss published The Illustrated National Alphabet illustrated with lithographs in 1865. He left lithography in 1868 and established an artists’ materials emporium at 25 North 11th Street, which he operated until about 1885.

Keyser & Foxe's Mahogany Steam Saw Mill & Turning Shop, Number 21 Crown Street between Race & Vine Streets, Philadelphia

George G. Heiss was a mid-19th century Philadelphia lithographer, who specialized in views of fire-fighting equipment. This lithograph advertises the sawmill run by Jacob Keyser and Bryan Fox at 21 (later 225) Crown Street. Three men work with mahogany logs. One of them guides a log onto a block-and-tackle lift from the sidewalk, while another holds the ropes and waits for the log on the second level. Another laborer moves a log on a ramp through an open doorway on the first floor. In the foreground, an unhitched dray stands near a log in the cobblestone street. Most of the windows and the doors are flanked by open, white shutters. Keyser & Foxe operated from this location between 1853 and 1861, after which the sawmill was renamed Bryan Fox & Son. Heiss was born in Philadelphia in 1823. He exhibited at the Artists' Fund Society 1840−43 and was also known as a portrait painter. He worked closely with Thomas Wagner and James McGuigan’s lithography studio from 1847 until 1855, when he opened his own establishment at 213 North Second Street. From then until the early 1860s, he mainly lithographed and published views of fire-fighting engines for local volunteer companies. Heiss published The Illustrated National Alphabet illustrated with lithographs in 1865. He left lithography in 1868 and established an artists’ materials emporium at 25 North 11th Street, which he operated until about 1885.