October 7, 2014

Conrad & Roberts Hardware & Cutlery, 123 North Third Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is his advertisement for the Conrad & Roberts Hardware & Cutlery store on the 200 block of North Third Street. It shows the storefront adorned with signage. The store interior is visible through the two open entrances. A clerk retrieves merchandise from a shelf for a patron and another serves a gentleman at a counter. Laborers move barrels and boxes from the open cellar. Above the cellar, a "Hardware" sign is displayed in front of the store window. At the upper windows, employees work and boxes, crates, and barrels are stacked. Also shown are crates and barrels (marked with illegible text) lining the sidewalk and partial views of adjacent buildings, including a part of the store sign on 125 North Third Street. Conrad and Roberts began operating from the address in 1845. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

S. Tobias, Importer & General Dealer in Wines, Liquors, Cordials and Syrups, Number 68, North Third Street, above Arch, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. His advertisement here shows the Tobias storefront adorned with signage on the 100 block of North Third Street. A patron enters one of the two open entryways at which a straw basket and wine cask are displayed across from a large cask-shaped sign, which reads "S. Tobias No. 68 Importer & Dealer in Wines Liquors Cordials and Syrups." At the other entryway, a laborer rolls a cask out the door near a worker entering the cellar. The backs of a patron and a clerk are visible in the rear of the store, in which shelves of liquor bottles, straw baskets, wine casks, and barrels are displayed on shelves, the floor, and the open display window. Other boxes, bottles, casks, and barrels are visible at the upper floor windows. Barrels and boxes, one marked "S. Tobias," line the sidewalk, near a street lamp in front of the store. There are partial views of the adjacent businesses and the signage adorning the storefronts of Charles M. Schott, dry goods (at number 66) and Scattergood & Whitall, druggists' glassware (at number 70). Tobias tenanted the site starting in 1845 and renamed his business Soloman Tobias & Son in 1847. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Wetherill's White Lead, Red Lead, Chemical Glass, Drug & Dye Stuff Store. Old Stand 65 North Front Street East Side, Three Doors South of Arch Street

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the storefront of Wetherill & Brother (John Price and Dr. William Wetherill) on Front Street above Market Street. Signs advertise the "Drug, Paint & Glass Store," proclaim the proprietors "Druggist & Color Men," and depict the store emblem of an American eagle with a shield atop a barrel, surrounded by apothecary packages and bordered by the text "Encourage your own Manufactory" and "65 Old Stand." Stacks of barrels flank the two open entryways in which the back of a clerk carrying a large box and two male patrons are visible. Decanters fill the display windows, and boxes, barrels, and glassware are stacked near the upper-floor windows. A clerk descends into the cellar across from a drayman, in the street, steadying his horse-drawn vehicle loaded with labeled packages. John Price and William Wetherill were the grandsons of Samuel Wetherill, the founder of the earliest white-lead factory in America. They assumed management of the business in 1837, with William handling purchases and John Price superintending the manufacturing branches. William assumed sole management of the firm following the death of John in 1853. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Charles Gilbert's Stove Manufactory, 249 North Second Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the Gilbert stove factory covered in signage in German and English on the 400 block of North Second Street. Patrons enter the storefront and a clerk, or possibly the proprietor, greets a patron at a second entrance. Stoves line the walls and are displayed at the entrances and in the shop windows. The appliances, of various styles, including a cooking stove with a tea kettle, also line the sidewalk. Laborers work at the upper-floor windows. The entrances are flanked by two stoves, atop which stand the figures of a man and a woman. The image shows partial views of the adjacent businesses, including P. McBride & Company, grocer (251) and Salon [sic] Walton (247), operated by Salem Walton. A signpost illustrated with a horse for the saloon bar, or tavern, stands in front of the building. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Lockwood and Smith, Importers and Dealers China, Glass and Queensware, 7 South Fourth Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is his advertisement for the Lockwood & Smith business at 7 South Fourth Street between Market and Chestnut Streets. A clerk greets a male patron at one of the open entryways. Shelves of plates, bowls, and pitchers line the walls of the store. In the display windows, more china, glass, and queensware (cream-colored earthenware), including tureens and pitchers, are on view. On the sidewalk, clerks handle a large hamper lying between large barrels and a second large hamper. Marked barrels read "China Withers & Stowers Cynthiana. KY. [Kentucky]" and "F. Cornog Phoenixville, Pa. [Pennsylvania]." Lockwood & Smith partnered at the address in 1845−46. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.

Moyer & Hazard, Successors of Alexander Fullerton, 174 Market Street, Fifth Door Above Fifth Street, Philadelphia. Elijah Bowen, Wholesale & Retail Hat & Cap Store, 176 Market Street, Philadelphia

William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is his advertisement for the adjacent businesses of wholesale druggists Charles Moyer and A. Fullerton Hazard (successors of Alexander Fullerton), and wholesale and retail hatter, Elijah Bowen. Both buildings are covered in signage. The "Alexander Fullerton drugs medicine & paints" signs on number 174 indicate the recent shift in ownership. A man stands in the left doorway of 174 directing a laborer who moves goods on a dolly. Another man emerges from the bulkhead, while a gentleman wearing a top hat enters the business through the door on the right. Decanters and other glassware fill the shop windows. Boxes and barrels labeled madder, indigo, turpentine, and so forth line the sidewalk. A man moves a box in the left door of Elijah Bowen's shop. Another laborer hammers the lid onto a wooden crate near the street. Top hats line the first-floor windowsills and are piled by open windows on the upper floors. A flag advertising the hat store flies from the attic dormer window. Moyer, Hazard, and Bowen operated at 174−76 Market Street from 1846 to 1854. Rease became active in his trade around 1844, and through the 1850s he mainly worked with printers Frederick Kuhl and Wagner & McGuigan in the production of advertising prints known for their portrayals of human details. Although Rease often collaborated with other lithographers, by 1850 he promoted in O'Brien's Business Directory his own establishment at 17 South Fifth Street, above Chestnut Street. In 1855 he relocated his establishment to the northeast corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets (after a circa 1853−55 partnership with Francis Schell), where in addition to advertising prints he produced certificates, views, maps, and maritime prints.