December 14, 2012

Construction at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant, July 7, 1938

Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on July 7, 1938, shows the power plant building construction works. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance in Latvia as a symbol of state and national identity during the first period of the history of the independent Latvian state (1918–1940). Its completion marked the beginning of a unified statewide power system and of the Latvenergo group. The plant triggered rapid economic growth, resulted in the electrification of Latvia’s regions, and improved the welfare of the Latvian population. Kraucs took images of the work once or twice a week during the period of construction. The resulting collection of 1,736 glass plate photonegatives is the only known example in Europe of such a comprehensive photographic record of a large-scale building project. The collection was inscribed on the Latvian National Memory of the World Register in 2009.

Construction at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant Dam, September 16, 1938

Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on September 16, 1938, shows the blocks for concreting the supports of the new metal bridge over the river and ice cutters at the power plant dam. The perspective makes clear the massive scale of the project. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance in Latvia as a symbol of state and national identity during the first period of the history of the independent Latvian state (1918–1940). Its completion marked the beginning of a unified statewide power system and of the Latvenergo group. The plant triggered rapid economic growth, resulted in the electrification of Latvia’s regions, and improved the welfare of the Latvian population. Kraucs took images of the work once or twice a week during the period of construction. The resulting collection of 1,736 glass plate photonegatives is the only known example in Europe of such a comprehensive photographic record of a large-scale building project. The collection was inscribed on the Latvian National Memory of the World Register in 2009.

Floodgate Assembly at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant Dam, November 3, 1938

Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on November 3, 1938, shows the floodgate assembly at the power plant dam. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance in Latvia as a symbol of state and national identity during the first period of the history of the independent Latvian state (1918–1940). Its completion marked the beginning of a unified statewide power system and of the Latvenergo group. The plant triggered rapid economic growth, resulted in the electrification of Latvia’s regions, and improved the welfare of the Latvian population. Kraucs took images of the work once or twice a week during the period of construction. The resulting collection of 1,736 glass plate photonegatives is the only known example in Europe of such a comprehensive photographic record of a large-scale building project. The collection was inscribed on the Latvian National Memory of the World Register in 2009.

Dam Construction at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant, January 1937

Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken in January 1937, shows the dam gallery construction at the plant. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance in Latvia as a symbol of state and national identity during the first period of the history of the independent Latvian state (1918–1940). Its completion marked the beginning of a unified statewide power system and of the Latvenergo group. The plant triggered rapid economic growth, resulted in the electrification of Latvia’s regions, and improved the welfare of the Latvian population. Kraucs took images of the work once or twice a week during the period of construction. The resulting collection of 1,736 glass plate photonegatives is the only known example in Europe of such a comprehensive photographic record of a large-scale building project. The collection was inscribed on the Latvian National Memory of the World Register in 2009.

Construction Work on the Dam at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant, May 1937

Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken in May 1937, shows workers pouring concrete at the foundation of the power plant dam. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance in Latvia as a symbol of state and national identity during the first period of the history of the independent Latvian state (1918–1940). Its completion marked the beginning of a unified statewide power system and of the Latvenergo group. The plant triggered rapid economic growth, resulted in the electrification of Latvia’s regions, and improved the welfare of the Latvian population. Kraucs took images of the work once or twice a week during the period of construction. The resulting collection of 1,736 glass plate photonegatives is the only known example in Europe of such a comprehensive photographic record of a large-scale building project. The collection was inscribed on the Latvian National Memory of the World Register in 2009.

Construction Reinforcements at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant, July 1937

Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken in July 1937, shows the assembly of reinforcements at the power plant construction site. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance in Latvia as a symbol of state and national identity during the first period of the history of the independent Latvian state (1918–1940). Its completion marked the beginning of a unified statewide power system and of the Latvenergo group. The plant triggered rapid economic growth, resulted in the electrification of Latvia’s regions, and improved the welfare of the Latvian population. Kraucs took images of the work once or twice a week during the period of construction. The resulting collection of 1,736 glass plate photonegatives is the only known example in Europe of such a comprehensive photographic record of a large-scale building project. The collection was inscribed on the Latvian National Memory of the World Register in 2009.