October 26, 2012

University of Pennsylvania

This lithograph shows the twin buildings of the University of Pennsylvania, Medical Hall and College Hall, located on the west side of 9th Street between Market and Chestnut Streets in Philadelphia. The view includes a group of students gathered in a doorway, two women carrying parasols, and other pedestrians. Designed by Philadelphia architect William Strickland (1788–1854) and constructed in 1829–30, the buildings housed the university until its removal to West Philadelphia in the 1870s. Strickland was one of the first architects of the Greek Revival style in the United States, as well as a civil engineer and artist. The University of Pennsylvania was founded in 1740 and in 1765 established the first medical school in the American colonies. The illustration is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804–46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer, who arrived in Philadelphia from Paris in 1832. He produced paintings and prints of Philadelphia and other American cities, including Cincinnati, Saint Louis, and Davenport, Iowa. His works are important historical records of these cities before the era of large-scale industrialization and rapid urban growth.

Market Street, from Front Street

This lithograph shows the active, business-lined street containing the New Jersey Market terminus in Philadelphia, named after its central location to the ferries from New Jersey, the city's main provider of farm produce. Market shoppers, purveyors of goods, and pedestrians, including African Americans, stroll the streets and sidewalks and pack the market shed topped with a cupola and clock. Peddlers sell their goods from carts on Front Street. Built in 1822, the market operated twice weekly until the abolition of street markets in 1859. A bell on Front Street would ring to indicate the arrival of a boat of fresh produce. The illustration is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804–46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer, who arrived in Philadelphia from Paris in 1832. He produced paintings and prints of Philadelphia and other American cities, including Cincinnati, Saint Louis, and Davenport, Iowa. His works are important historical records of these cities before the era of large-scale industrialization and rapid urban growth.

View of the Department for White Children of the House of Refuge

This print depicts the buildings of the Department for White Children of the House of Refuge in Philadelphia, including the girls’ dormitories (first and second class), the girls’ work and sitting room, the officers’ rooms and main entrance, the boys’ dormitories, and the boys’ workshop. The lithograph is one of a pair of illustrations also printed on textile in 1858, as well as was used as the frontispiece to the Thirtieth Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the House of Refuge, the other being “View of the Department for Coloured Children of the House of Refuge.” Founded in 1828, the House of Refuge was the first institution in Pennsylvania charged with reforming and educating juveniles accused of delinquency and providing an alternative to prison. These buildings, located between Parrish and Brown Streets between 22nd and 24th Streets, opened in 1850.

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia

In the 1830s, a group of influential Philadelphians wanted to establish a rural cemetery that would be naturalistic, serene, and in genteel seclusion. They settled on Laurel Hill at 3822 Ridge Avenue, the former estate of merchant Joseph Sims, which had rocky bluffs and spectacular views and was about six kilometers from the city center. The cemetery was built in 1836–39 after the designs of Scottish-born architect and landscape designer John Notman. This view shows the main gate. A man on horseback rides past the cemetery, in which the Gothic-style funerary chapel is visible in the background. Countryside and trees dominate the foreground. The illustration is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804–46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer, who arrived in Philadelphia from Paris in 1832. He produced paintings and prints of Philadelphia and other American cities, including Cincinnati, Saint Louis, and Davenport, Iowa. His works are important historical records of these cities before the era of large-scale industrialization and rapid urban growth.

Manayunk near Philadelphia

This lithograph shows the textile village of Manayunk along the east bank of the Schuylkill River, northwest of Philadelphia. The townscape includes Joseph Ripka's cotton mills, which were erected in 1831 and 1835 and were part of one of the largest textile businesses in the United States at the time. In the background is Flat Rock Turnpike Bridge, a long covered bridge that stood from 1810 to 1850. Manayunk’s plentiful water supply and good transport links made it important in the nation’s industrial revolution. The village was incorporated into the city of Philadelphia in 1854. The illustration is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804–46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer, who arrived in Philadelphia from Paris in 1832. He produced paintings and prints of Philadelphia and other American cities, including Cincinnati, Saint Louis, and Davenport, Iowa. His works are important historical records of these cities before the era of large-scale industrialization and rapid urban growth.

Merchants' Exchange

This lithograph shows the view looking northeast from the intersection of Dock, Third, and Walnut Streets in Philadelphia to the Merchants' Exchange. Built between 1832 and 1833 to the designs of William Strickland (1788–1854), the exchange functioned as a commercial and financial hub and post office and was the first large central building in Philadelphia for the conduct of business. Men are seen walking around and horse-drawn omnibuses arrive at and are parked in front of the building. Light pedestrian traffic is visible in the street and at the corners, including near the office of the Saturday Courier. The print also shows streetcar tracks in the foreground and another omnibus passing Girard National Bank (formerly the First Bank of the United States) in the background. The illustration is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804–46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer, who arrived in Philadelphia from Paris in 1832. He produced paintings and prints of Philadelphia and other American cities, including Cincinnati, Saint Louis, and Davenport, Iowa. His works are important historical records of these cities before the era of large-scale industrialization and rapid urban growth.