October 2, 2012

Map of New Netherland, Virginia, and New England

Joan Vinckeboons (1617–70) was a Dutch cartographer and engraver born into a family of artists of Flemish origin. He was employed by the Dutch West India Company and for more than 30 years produced maps for use by Dutch mercantile and military shipping. He was a business partner of Joan Blaeu, one of the most important map and atlas publishers of the day. Vinckeboons drew a series of 200 manuscript maps that were used in the production of atlases, including Blaeu’s Atlas Maior. This pen-and-ink and watercolor map from around 1639 shows the northeast coast of the United States from New England to Virginia, including coastal features and other geographical entities. The colony of New Netherland was established by the Dutch in 1621, and over time was increasingly threatened by larger British colonies to the north and to the south. The British seized New Netherland in 1664, ending the Dutch colonial presence in North America. British and Dutch settlements and forts are shown, along with the names of Indian tribes. The map was once part of a manuscript atlas belonging to the Dutch firm of Gerard Hulst van Keulen, which published sea atlases and navigational handbooks for over two centuries. With the demise of the firm, the atlas was acquired and broken up by the Amsterdam book dealer Frederik Muller, who in 1887 sold 13 maps from the atlas attributed to Vinckeboons to the collector and bibliographer Henry Harrisse. This map is part of the Henry Harrisse Collection in the Library of Congress.

The North River in New Netherland

Joan Vinckeboons (1617–70) was a Dutch cartographer and engraver born into a family of artists of Flemish origin. He was employed by the Dutch West India Company and for more than 30 years produced maps for use by Dutch mercantile and military shipping. He was a business partner of Joan Blaeu, one of the most important map and atlas publishers of the day. Vinckeboons drew a series of 200 manuscript maps that were used in the production of atlases, including Blaeu’s Atlas Maior. This pen-and-ink and watercolor map from around 1639 shows the Hudson, or North River, as it was called by the Dutch, from Manhattan Island to present-day Albany, New York. The region was part of the colony of New Netherland, which was established by the Dutch in 1621 and ruled by them until it was seized by the British in 1664. Place-names, and the names of Native American tribes, such as the Mohicans, are given. Relief is shown pictorially, and depths shown by soundings. The map was once part of a manuscript atlas belonging to the Dutch firm of Gerard Hulst van Keulen, which published sea atlases and navigational handbooks for over two centuries. With the demise of the firm, the atlas was acquired and broken up by the Amsterdam book dealer Frederik Muller, who in 1887 sold 13 maps from the atlas attributed to Vinckeboons to the collector and bibliographer Henry Harrisse. The map is part of the Henry Harrisse Collection in the Library of Congress.

Map of the South River in New Netherland

Joan Vinckeboons (1617–70) was a Dutch cartographer and engraver born into a family of artists of Flemish origin. He was employed by the Dutch West India Company and for more than 30 years produced maps for use by Dutch mercantile and military shipping. He was a business partner of Joan Blaeu, one of the most important map and atlas publishers of the day. Vinckeboons drew a series of 200 manuscript maps that were used in the production of atlases, including Blaeu’s Atlas Maior. This pen-and-ink and watercolor map from around 1639 shows the South (Delaware) River, Delaware Bay, and the adjoining coasts. This region was part of the colony of New Netherland, which was established by the Dutch in 1621 and ruled by them until it was seized by the British in 1664. The map shows settlements and geographical features, with water depths in soundings. The text on the left side of the map contains a description of the Native American tribes living in the region. The map was once part of a manuscript atlas belonging to the Dutch firm of Gerard Hulst van Keulen, which published sea atlases and navigational handbooks for over two centuries. With the demise of the firm, the atlas was acquired and broken up by the Amsterdam book dealer Frederik Muller, who in 1887 sold 13 maps from the atlas attributed to Vinckeboons to the collector and bibliographer Henry Harrisse. This map is part of the Henry Harrisse Collection in the Library of Congress.

Map of the Peninsula of Florida

Joan Vinckeboons (1617–70) was a Dutch cartographer and engraver born into a family of artists of Flemish origin. He was employed by the Dutch West India Company and for more than 30 years produced maps for use by Dutch mercantile and military shipping. He was a business partner of Joan Blaeu, one of the most important map and atlas publishers of the day. Vinckeboons drew a series of 200 manuscript maps that were used in the production of atlases, including Blaeu’s Atlas Maior. This circa 1639 map of the peninsula of Florida, called "Cabo De La Florida," shows the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastlines, coastal features, navigational hazards, rhumb lines, and a pictorial representation of palm trees along the Atlantic Coast near Saint Augustine. Adjacent islands are shown, and water depths by soundings are given. Almost all geographic names are in Spanish. Three scales show distances in Dutch, Spanish, and English leagues. The map was once part of a manuscript atlas belonging to the Dutch firm of Gerard Hulst van Keulen, which published sea atlases and navigational handbooks for over two centuries. With the demise of the firm, the atlas was acquired and broken up by the Amsterdam book dealer Frederik Muller, who in 1887 sold 13 maps from the atlas attributed to Vinckeboons to the collector and bibliographer Henry Harrisse. This map is part of the Henry Harrisse Collection in the Library of Congress.

October 4, 2012

Variations of the Compass for the Year 1925

The annotation on this map reads, “Used in laying out route for flight from San Diego to St. Louis to New York to Paris, 1927” and is signed C.A. Lindbergh. The map bears the official stamp: “CORRECTED THROUGH NOTICE TO MARINERS NO 25 JUNE 19’26 HYDROGRAPHIC OFFICE NAVY DEPARTMENT.” Charles Lindbergh (1902–74) was the American aviator who made the first nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean on May 21–22, 1927. Because Lindbergh relied on the dead-reckoning method of navigation, this map would have been useful in determining the magnetic declination (the angular difference between magnetic north and true north).

Great Circle Sailing Chart of the North Atlantic Ocean

Charles Lindbergh (1902–74) was the American aviator who made the first nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean on May 21–22, 1927. This is the chart with the gnomonic projection that he referred to as the “nugget of gold” that he found in a shop in San Pedro, California, while preparing for his transatlantic flight. It was this chart that enabled Lindbergh to determine quickly and accurately the great circle latitudes and longitudes as he plotted his course. The annotation on the map reads, “Used in laying out Great Circle Course for New York to Paris flight. San Diego, Calif. 1927. C.A.L.” In his 1953 book, The Spirit of St. Louis, Lindbergh described his use of this map: “My navigating problems have begun to clarify. I found, printed on the charts I bought, ample instructions for laying out my great-circle route. With the instruments Hall loaned me, I drew a straight line between New York and Paris on the gnomonic projection. Then I transferred points from that line, at hundred-mile intervals, to the Mercator’s projection, and connected these points with straight lines. At each point, I mark down the distance from New York and the magnetic course to the next change in angle.”