January 30, 2012

Russian Railroad Troop Transport and Soldiers Crashing through Ice

The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. This print forms part of the series, Rokoku seibatsu senshō shōwa (The expeditionary war against Russia: tales of laughter). The illustrator is Utagawa Kokunimasa, also known as Baidō Bōsai or Utagawa Kunimasa V (1874–1944). The satirical writer Honekawa Dojin (pseudonym of Nishimori Takeki, 1862–1913) supplied each illustration with an accompanying humorous description. The series mocked the Russians for their perceived military weakness, conceit, and cowardice. The text has puns throughout that play on Chinese characters that indicate negative meanings, such as death and suffering, or names of battle locations. Here two Japanese muse that it was not only the strength of the Japanese army that won battles, but the recklessness of the Russians who had built a railway on Lake Baikal. After seeing a train sink, they consider rescuing the drowning soldiers, but the Russians are “too fearful of Japan to raise their heads, and too helpless to reach out their arms.”

Russian Businessman Talking to Two Workmen Attempting to Repair a Damaged Russian Battleship

The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. This print forms part of the series, Rokoku seibatsu senshō shōwa (The expeditionary war against Russia: tales of laughter). The illustrator is Utagawa Kokunimasa, also known as Baidō Bōsai or Utagawa Kunimasa V (1874–1944). The satirical writer Honekawa Dojin (pseudonym of Nishimori Takeki, 1862–1913) supplied each illustration with an accompanying humorous description. The series mocked the Russians for their perceived military weakness, conceit, and cowardice. The text has puns throughout that play on Chinese characters that indicate negative meanings, such as death and suffering, or names of battle locations. In this print, carpenters fixing a Russian navy ship complain that despite their efforts, the ships will be sunk anyway by the Japanese. At that very moment they are surprised by the sound of cannon shot.

Caricature of Russian Army Showing Russian Officer with Troops in Formation

The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. This print forms part of the series, Rokoku seibatsu senshō shōwa (The expeditionary war against Russia: tales of laughter). The illustrator is Utagawa Kokunimasa, also known as Baidō Bōsai or Utagawa Kunimasa V (1874–1944). The satirical writer Honekawa Dojin (pseudonym of Nishimori Takeki, 1862–1913) supplied each illustration with an accompanying humorous description. The series mocked the Russians for their perceived military weakness, conceit, and cowardice. Here the Russian soldiers are depicted as starving, with their lines of supply cut off by the Japanese. When the commander admonishes them for being so weak, they reply that they would be grateful if the Japanese attacked. That would allow them to “eat foam” (become flustered) and “eat bullets” (to be shot at), expressions that convey the panic, confusion, and desperate hunger of the Russians.

Russian Doctor and Nurse Attending to a Man with a Russian Battleship for a Head Lying in Bed

The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. This print forms part of the series, Rokoku seibatsu senshō shōwa (The expeditionary war against Russia: tales of laughter). The illustrator is Utagawa Kokunimasa, also known as Baidō Bōsai or Utagawa Kunimasa V (1874–1944). The satirical writer Honekawa Dojin (pseudonym of Nishimori Takeki, 1862–1913) supplied each illustration with an accompanying humorous description. The series mocked the Russians for their perceived military weakness, conceit, and cowardice. The text is littered with puns that play on Chinese characters that indicate negative meaning, such as death and suffering, or names of battle locations. In this print published in 1904, a Russian navy ship is sick in bed, suffering the effects of many battles with the Japanese, in which the Russians had no hope of victory.

Pressure from a Heavy Hand

The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847–1915) contributed this farcical single-sheet print to the series, Nihon banzai hyakusen hyakushō (Long live Japan: 100 victories, 100 laughs). Kiyochika, known for producing woodblock prints using Western painting methods, had been under the brief tutelage of Charles Wirgman (1832–91), an English cartoonist for the Illustrated London News. Kiyochika also became a full-time political cartoonist for a Japanese magazine in 1882–93. The satirical writer Honekawa Dojin (pseudonym of Nishimori Takeki, 1862–1913) supplied each illustration with an accompanying humorous description. The series mocked the Russians for their perceived military weakness, conceit, and cowardice. This print depicts the large hand of the Japanese army crushing Port Arthur, a strategic warm-water port on the Liaodong Peninsula of Manchuria (present-day China), on July 25, 1904.

The Crying Sounds of a Telegram

The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847–1915) contributed this farcical single-sheet print to the series, Nihon banzai hyakusen hyakushō (Long live Japan: 100 victories, 100 laughs). Kiyochika, known for producing woodblock prints using Western painting methods, had been under the brief tutelage of Charles Wirgman (1832–91), an English cartoonist for the Illustrated London News. Kiyochika also became a full-time political cartoonist for a Japanese magazine in 1882–93. The satirical writer Honekawa Dojin (pseudonym of Nishimori Takeki, 1862–1913) supplied each illustration with an accompanying humorous description. The series mocked the Russians for their perceived military weakness, conceit, and cowardice. In this print, a Russian couple, possibly the tsar and tsarina, receive a telegram and expect it to be full of victorious news. They shed tears of chagrin after finding out about the successive victories of the Japanese army.