Novgorod Province

This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Novgorod Province, located in the western part of the empire. Novgorod, situated on the Volkhov River, north of Lake Il’men’, was the administrative center of the province. Although Novgorod means "new city" in Russian, it is one of the oldest Russian cities, and was founded in the ninth century. The card indicates that the distance from Novgorod to St. Petersburg was 184½ versts, and from Novgorod to Moscow, 535¼ versts. A verst is a Russian measurement of distance, no longer used, equal to 1.0668 kilometers.

Nizhegorod Province

This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Nizhegorod Province, located in the western part of the empire. Nizhnii Novgorod, situated at the confluence of the Volga and Oka rivers, was the administrative center of the province. The city was founded in 1221, and became an important trade center between Russia and the East. The card indicates that the distance from Nizhnii Novgorod to St. Petersburg was 1,096¼ versts, and from Nizhnii Novgorod to Moscow, 443 versts. A verst is a Russian measurement of distance, no longer used, equal to 1.0668 kilometers.

Penza Province

This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Penza Province, located in the western part of the empire. Penza, the administrative center of the province, was founded in 1666 as a fortress, and is situated at the confluence of the Penza and Sura rivers. The card indicates that the distance from Penza to St. Petersburg was 1,419¾ versts, and from Penza to Moscow, 700 versts. A verst is a Russian measurement of distance, no longer used, equal to 1.0668 kilometers.

Tver Province

This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Tver Province, located in the western part of the empire. Tver', the administrative center of the province, is situated at the confluence of the Volga and Tvertsa rivers. Tver' was founded as a fortress in the late 12th century, and later became the center of the powerful principality of Tver’. The card indicates that the distance from Tver' to St. Petersburg was 558 versts, and from Tver' to Moscow, 161¾ versts. A verst is a Russian measurement of distance, no longer used, equal to 1.0668 kilometers.

Smolensk Province

This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Smolensk Province, located in the western part of the empire. Smolensk, the administrative center of the province, is situated on the Dnieper River. In the 9th century, Smolensk was a commercial center on the trade route between the Baltic Sea and the Byzantine Empire. The card indicates that the distance from Smolensk to St. Petersburg was 699½ versts, and from Smolensk to Moscow, 381½ versts. A verst is a Russian measurement of distance, no longer used, equal to 1.0668 kilometers.

Moscow Province

This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Moscow Province, located in the western part of the empire. The province was established by Peter the Great in 1708. Moscow, situated on the Moscow River, was the administrative center of the province, and is the capital of present-day Russia. The card indicates that the distance from Moscow to St. Petersburg was 719¾ versts. A verst is a Russian measurement of distance, no longer used, equal to 1.0668 kilometers.

Belostok Region

This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts the Belostok Region, located in the western part of the empire, bordering on Poland. Belostok was acquired by Russia from Prussia in 1807, under the terms of the Treaties of Tilsit. The city of Belostok (Białystok, in Polish) was the administrative center of the region, and is located in present-day Poland. The card indicates that the distance from Belostok to St. Petersburg was 1,065 versts, and from Belostok to Moscow, 1,108½ versts. A verst is a Russian measurement of distance, no longer used, equal to 1.0668 kilometers.

Bessarabia Province

This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts the Bessarabia Province, located in the southwestern part of the empire on territory annexed by Russia from the Ottoman Empire in 1812. Kishinev (Chişinău, in Romanian), was the administrative center of the province, and is the capital of present-day Moldova. The card indicates that the distance from Kishinev to St. Petersburg was 1,692½ versts, and from Kishinev to Moscow, 1,425¼ versts. A verst is a Russian measurement of distance, no longer used, equal to 1.0668 kilometers.

Simbir Province

This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Simbir Province, located in the western part of the empire. Simbirsk (present-day Ulianovsk), the administrative center of the province, is situated on the Volga River. It was founded in 1648, as a fortress to defend Russia's southern frontier. The card indicates that the distance from Simbirsk to St. Petersburg was 1,472½ versts, and from Simbirsk to Moscow, 753 versts. A verst is a Russian measurement of distance, no longer used, equal to 1.0668 kilometers.

Kazan Province

This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Kazan Province, located in the southwestern part of the empire. Kazan', situated on the Volga River, was the administrative center of the province. Kazan' was taken from the Golden Horde, the Mongol Khanate, by Ivan IV (“the Terrible”) in 1552. The card indicates that the distance from Kazan' to St. Petersburg was 1,541½ versts, and from Kazan' to Moscow, 821¾ versts. A verst is a Russian measurement of distance, no longer used, equal to 1.0668 kilometers.