Suzdal. the Cathedral of the Nativity of Christ i.e. the Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Riazan. The Trubezh River and the Cathedral of Christ's Nativity

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Riazan. Assumption Cathedral from the East

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Detail of a Wall in the Assumption Cathedral. Riazan

The ancient city of Ryazan is first mentioned in chronicles in 1096. This 1912 view shows the lower part of the south facade of the main Cathedral of the Dormition, located in the city’s Kremlin (fortress). A rebuilding of the cathedral, one of the largest 17th-century Russian churches, was completed in 1699 by the architect Yakov Bukhvostov. Over 40 meters high, with extensive window space, the structure is balanced on Bukhvostov's system of cellar vaults that also support a terrace used by the photographer to capture this image. The red brick facades are framed with carved limestone columns, pediments, and window surrounds in a florid style typical for this period. Close examination shows that the limestone carving has been emphasized in white on a deep blue background. Visible on the right is part of the Cathedral of Archangel Michael. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire in the early 20th century. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many parts of the empire.

Riazan. Monastery of Our Savior from the Northwest

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Entrance into the Monastery of Our Savior. Riazan

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Riazan. The Church of Archangel Michael, Formerly Belonging to the Grand Duke, Next to Assumption Cathedral

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Former Mansion of the Grand Dukes, Today the Archbishop's House. Riazan

The ancient city of Riazan is first mentioned in chronicles in 1096. Riazan became the center of a principality that existed from the early 12th century to the beginning of the 16th century. After its destruction in 1237 by the Mongol khan Baty, Riazan arose at another location, 60 kilometers from its original site. This 1912 view shows the building popularly known as the Grand Ducal Palace. At the top of the main facade is a medallion depicting the 14th-century Prince Oleg. The structure in fact was built only in 1653–55 for Archbishop Misail, and could not have been associated with Oleg. (The medallion was effaced during the Soviet period.) The main facade of the archbishop’s palace was completed in 1692 with elements of baroque decoration. The structure itself was expanded in the latter 17th and 18th centuries. Visible on the right is part of the Cathedral of Archangel Michael, constructed in the 1470s. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire in the early 20th century. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many parts of the empire.

Riazan. Cathedral of Saints. Boris and Gleb

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

General View of the Golutvinskii Monastery for Men, from the West. Cathedral of the Venerable Sergii Radonezhskii. Kolomna

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.