Near Zotovskaia Canal on the Axis of the Reshotka River Canal, at the Water Tower of Khrustalnaia Station, on the Perm-Kungur Railroad

This photograph was taken in 1912 at Khrustal’naia Station on the main railroad line to the west of Ekaterinburg. The partially obscured wooden station building and attached water tower display the functional but attractive architectural style typical of the late 19th century. In the foreground is the small Zotov drainage canal, which runs into the Reshetka River. Only about 35 kilometers in length, the Reshetka for much of its path forms part of a channeled link between the Chusovaia and Iset’ Rivers. It empties into the Iset’ River, which flows eastward to Ekaterinburg. Visible in the background are tall birch and fir trees typical of the taiga forest in the wooded area around Khrustal’naia and the nearby Palkino region. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire in the early 20th century. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many parts of the empire. During this period he worked extensively in the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations and factories.

Pumping Station and Dam at Khrustalnaia Station

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Khrustalnaia Station on the Perm-Kungur Railroad

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

General View of the Village of Reshota from Lipovaia Hill

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

On the Dam of the Reservoir of the Chusovaia River (at the Confluence of the Reshotka River)

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Chusovaia River near the Hydrometric Station at the Confluence of the Reshotka River

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Hydrometric Station. Chusovaia River

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Hut of Settler Artemii, Nicknamed Kota, Who Has Lived at This Place More than 40 Years

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

In the Forest

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Village of Kamenka. General View

This view shows the village of Kamenka (in present-day Sverdlovsk Oblast), located where the small Kamenka River flows into the Chusovaya River. Founded in 1574 as one of the easternmost settlements belonging to the Stroganovs, Kamenka flourished in the 18th century with a water-powered sawmill that produced planks used for boat construction. In the center of the photograph is a log house in a traditional design, with a four-sloped wooden roof that covers living space in the front (with white window frames) and a barn in back. Sturdy pines cling to the top of the rocky bank on the right. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire in the early 20th century. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many parts of the empire. Prokudin-Gorskii made several trips to the Ural Mountains territory, where he photographed railroad installations and factories as well as picturesque locations. In 1912 he traveled along the Chusovaya River as part of a trip leading to western Siberia via the Kama-Tobolsk Waterway.