General View of Makarovskoe Reservoir from the Northwest

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Chusovaia River in the Village of Makarovo

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

General View of the Village of Makarovo

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Washing Brown Iron Ore at the Shilovskii Mine Seven Versts from the Village of Makarovo

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Brown Iron Ore Excavated and Piled at the Same Mine

Originating in the southern Urals, the Chusovaya River flows some 590 kilometers to the northwest and empties into the Kama River near the city of Perm. The rocky, forested terrain along the Chusovaya is rich in minerals. Shown here is part of the laborious process for obtaining brown iron ore at the Shilov Mine, located seven kilometers from the village of Makareva on the Chusovaya in the vicinity of Ekaterinburg. The excavation site is in the foreground, and the rich iron-bearing rocks are piled in the center among pine and birch trees. The washed ore was transported to smelters via the river network. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire in the early 20th century. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire. During his work Prokudin-Gorskii made several trips to the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations and factories as well as picturesque locations. In 1912 he traveled along the Chusovaya River as part of an expedition leading to western Siberia via the Kama-Tobol Waterway.

Valley of the Iset River at the Village of Kolchedan

This photograph shows the Iset River valley near the village of Kolchedanskoe (Kolchedan), situated at the confluence of the small Kolchedanka River with the Iset near the boundary of contemporary Sverdlovsk and Kurgan Oblast. The village, whose name refers to an iron-bearing rock, was founded in 1650 as an outpost to defend the region from attack by Bashkirs, who were not subdued until the latter half of the 18th century. Visible here is a flood plain, with vegetable fields enclosed in wattle fences. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire in the early 20th century. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire. In 1912 Prokudin-Gorskii participated in an expedition along the Kama-Tobol Waterway together with members of the Imperial Russian Geographical Society. During the expedition he did extensive photography in the area of the Iset River. The Iset, 600 kilometers in length, originates northwest of Ekaterinburg, flows through that city, and proceeds east to the Tobol River.

Village of Kolchedan

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Iset River. The Village of Vodolazy Is in the Distance

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Village of Vodolazy, Five Versts from the Village of Kolchedan

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Reshotka River Next to the Village of Reshota on the Canal's Axis (View of the Opposite Side)

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.