Central Africa: Naked Truths of Naked People

Charles Chaillé-Long (1842–1917) was an American from the state of Maryland who enlisted as a private in the Union Army in the Civil War, fought in the Battle of Gettysburg, and rose to the rank of captain. In 1870 he was one of the approximately 50 former Union and Confederate officers recruited to assist the khedive of Egypt in developing a national army. He became chief of staff to General Charles (“Chinese”) Gordon when Gordon was governor of Equatoria Province in Sudan. In that capacity, in April 1874 Chaillé-Long set out on a diplomatic mission to Mutesa, king of the Baganda tribe, thereby becoming the first American to visit Uganda. He went on to explore Lake Victoria and the Nile. Chaillé-Long returned to Khartoum in October 1875. He departed again in December to lead an expedition to the Makraka Niam-Niam (as he called Azande country), and the Nile-Congo watershed. Central Africa: Naked Truths of Naked People is Chaillé-Long’s account of his travels in Sudan and Uganda. The book is written in flamboyant prose and is full of self-praise for the author’s accomplishments. Chaillé-Long later returned to the United States, graduated from Columbia Law School in 1880, and practiced law in Alexandria, Egypt for two years. He became, in 1887–89, the U.S. consul general in Korea. He wrote numerous articles and travel books in both English and French.

Cathedral of the Nativity of Christ i.e. Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin. Suzdal

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Detail of the Western Wall in the Cathedral of the Nativity of Christ i.e. the Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin. Suzdal

The ancient town of Suzdal’ was a rich center of medieval Russian heritage. Finno-Ugric and Slavic peoples had long lived in the area before Prince Vladimir Monomakh of Kiev arrived at the turn of the 12th century with a new wave of settlers. The most important of the town’s many churches was the Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin, built in 1222–25 by Prince Yurii Vsevolovich on the site of an earlier church constructed around 1102. The structure was primarily made of light tufa, with limestone for the details. In 1445 the upper part of the cathedral collapsed. When rebuilt in 1528–30, the stone walls were lowered to the level of the arcade frieze, while the upper structure was rebuilt of brick. Seen in this 1912 view is part of the south facade, with a decorative arcade strip of limestone columns recessed into the wall surface. Also visible are two stone female masks. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire in the early 20th century. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many parts of the empire.

Eastern Wall of the Spaso-Evfimievskii Monastery. Suzdal

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Spaso-Evfimievskii Monastery. Second Gate in the Wall. Suzdal

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Entrance Gate of the Venerable Rizpolozhenskii Monastery. Suzdal

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Church of the Life-Giving Trinity, in the Venerable Monastery. Suzdal

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Tiles on the Outside Wall of the Cathedral of the Venerable Monastery. Suzdal

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Entrance Gate to the Trinity Church of the Venerable Monastery. Suzdal

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.

Sepulchre of the Saintly Evfrosiniia. The Venerable Monastery. Suzdal

At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.