November 16, 2017

Killed Seagull

This photograph is from a collection entitled “Timeless Chukotka,” which was created by Moscow photographer Aleksandr Vladimirovich Sorin (born 1965) and Novosibirsk journalist Artem Gotlib. In June and July of 2003, Sorin and Gotlib undertook an expedition to the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, the most northeasterly region of the Russian Federation. Chukotka is characterized by a low population density, an untouched and mostly mountainous natural landscape, and a harsh Arctic climate. About half of the region’s territory lies north of the Arctic Circle. Transportation by airplane is more efficient and more widespread than travel on the region’s few roads. Sorin and Gotlib initially planned to travel by barge along the Anadyr’ River, but the complications of transportation in Chukotka led them to alter their plans. Their eventual route took them from Anadyr’, the administrative center of the region, to the tundra settlement of Ust’-Belaya, and on to the settlements of Bukhta Provideniya, Sireniki, and Novoye Chaplino on the shores of the Bering Sea. Sorin and Gotlib concluded that conventional concepts of time and punctuality have little meaning in Chukotka, which explains the word “timeless” that they used in naming their collection. The photographs depict the daily lives of the people of Chukotka, as well as its settlements, coastlines, and natural landscapes. The collection was gathered for the Meeting of Frontiers digital library project in the early 2000s.

Hunting Birds

This photograph is from a collection entitled “Timeless Chukotka,” which was created by Moscow photographer Aleksandr Vladimirovich Sorin (born 1965) and Novosibirsk journalist Artem Gotlib. In June and July of 2003, Sorin and Gotlib undertook an expedition to the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, the most northeasterly region of the Russian Federation. Chukotka is characterized by a low population density, an untouched and mostly mountainous natural landscape, and a harsh Arctic climate. About half of the region’s territory lies north of the Arctic Circle. Transportation by airplane is more efficient and more widespread than travel on the region’s few roads. Sorin and Gotlib initially planned to travel by barge along the Anadyr’ River, but the complications of transportation in Chukotka led them to alter their plans. Their eventual route took them from Anadyr’, the administrative center of the region, to the tundra settlement of Ust’-Belaya, and on to the settlements of Bukhta Provideniya, Sireniki, and Novoye Chaplino on the shores of the Bering Sea. Sorin and Gotlib concluded that conventional concepts of time and punctuality have little meaning in Chukotka, which explains the word “timeless” that they used in naming their collection. The photographs depict the daily lives of the people of Chukotka, as well as its settlements, coastlines, and natural landscapes. The collection was gathered for the Meeting of Frontiers digital library project in the early 2000s.

Kaplik Cliff. Hunting Birds. Vasya

This photograph is from a collection entitled “Timeless Chukotka,” which was created by Moscow photographer Aleksandr Vladimirovich Sorin (born 1965) and Novosibirsk journalist Artem Gotlib. In June and July of 2003, Sorin and Gotlib undertook an expedition to the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, the most northeasterly region of the Russian Federation. Chukotka is characterized by a low population density, an untouched and mostly mountainous natural landscape, and a harsh Arctic climate. About half of the region’s territory lies north of the Arctic Circle. Transportation by airplane is more efficient and more widespread than travel on the region’s few roads. Sorin and Gotlib initially planned to travel by barge along the Anadyr’ River, but the complications of transportation in Chukotka led them to alter their plans. Their eventual route took them from Anadyr’, the administrative center of the region, to the tundra settlement of Ust’-Belaya, and on to the settlements of Bukhta Provideniya, Sireniki, and Novoye Chaplino on the shores of the Bering Sea. Sorin and Gotlib concluded that conventional concepts of time and punctuality have little meaning in Chukotka, which explains the word “timeless” that they used in naming their collection. The photographs depict the daily lives of the people of Chukotka, as well as its settlements, coastlines, and natural landscapes. The collection was gathered for the Meeting of Frontiers digital library project in the early 2000s.

Vasya and a Whale Vertebra

This photograph is from a collection entitled “Timeless Chukotka,” which was created by Moscow photographer Aleksandr Vladimirovich Sorin (born 1965) and Novosibirsk journalist Artem Gotlib. In June and July of 2003, Sorin and Gotlib undertook an expedition to the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, the most northeasterly region of the Russian Federation. Chukotka is characterized by a low population density, an untouched and mostly mountainous natural landscape, and a harsh Arctic climate. About half of the region’s territory lies north of the Arctic Circle. Transportation by airplane is more efficient and more widespread than travel on the region’s few roads. Sorin and Gotlib initially planned to travel by barge along the Anadyr’ River, but the complications of transportation in Chukotka led them to alter their plans. Their eventual route took them from Anadyr’, the administrative center of the region, to the tundra settlement of Ust’-Belaya, and on to the settlements of Bukhta Provideniya, Sireniki, and Novoye Chaplino on the shores of the Bering Sea. Sorin and Gotlib concluded that conventional concepts of time and punctuality have little meaning in Chukotka, which explains the word “timeless” that they used in naming their collection. The photographs depict the daily lives of the people of Chukotka, as well as its settlements, coastlines, and natural landscapes. The collection was gathered for the Meeting of Frontiers digital library project in the early 2000s.

Kaplik Cliff

This photograph is from a collection entitled “Timeless Chukotka,” which was created by Moscow photographer Aleksandr Vladimirovich Sorin (born 1965) and Novosibirsk journalist Artem Gotlib. In June and July of 2003, Sorin and Gotlib undertook an expedition to the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, the most northeasterly region of the Russian Federation. Chukotka is characterized by a low population density, an untouched and mostly mountainous natural landscape, and a harsh Arctic climate. About half of the region’s territory lies north of the Arctic Circle. Transportation by airplane is more efficient and more widespread than travel on the region’s few roads. Sorin and Gotlib initially planned to travel by barge along the Anadyr’ River, but the complications of transportation in Chukotka led them to alter their plans. Their eventual route took them from Anadyr’, the administrative center of the region, to the tundra settlement of Ust’-Belaya, and on to the settlements of Bukhta Provideniya, Sireniki, and Novoye Chaplino on the shores of the Bering Sea. Sorin and Gotlib concluded that conventional concepts of time and punctuality have little meaning in Chukotka, which explains the word “timeless” that they used in naming their collection. The photographs depict the daily lives of the people of Chukotka, as well as its settlements, coastlines, and natural landscapes. The collection was gathered for the Meeting of Frontiers digital library project in the early 2000s.

Woman with Traditional Face Tattooing

This photograph is from a collection entitled “Timeless Chukotka,” which was created by Moscow photographer Aleksandr Vladimirovich Sorin (born 1965) and Novosibirsk journalist Artem Gotlib. In June and July of 2003, Sorin and Gotlib undertook an expedition to the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, the most northeasterly region of the Russian Federation. Chukotka is characterized by a low population density, an untouched and mostly mountainous natural landscape, and a harsh Arctic climate. About half of the region’s territory lies north of the Arctic Circle. Transportation by airplane is more efficient and more widespread than travel on the region’s few roads. Sorin and Gotlib initially planned to travel by barge along the Anadyr’ River, but the complications of transportation in Chukotka led them to alter their plans. Their eventual route took them from Anadyr’, the administrative center of the region, to the tundra settlement of Ust’-Belaya, and on to the settlements of Bukhta Provideniya, Sireniki, and Novoye Chaplino on the shores of the Bering Sea. Sorin and Gotlib concluded that conventional concepts of time and punctuality have little meaning in Chukotka, which explains the word “timeless” that they used in naming their collection. The photographs depict the daily lives of the people of Chukotka, as well as its settlements, coastlines, and natural landscapes. The collection was gathered for the Meeting of Frontiers digital library project in the early 2000s.

Woman with Traditional Face Tattooing

This photograph is from a collection entitled “Timeless Chukotka,” which was created by Moscow photographer Aleksandr Vladimirovich Sorin (born 1965) and Novosibirsk journalist Artem Gotlib. In June and July of 2003, Sorin and Gotlib undertook an expedition to the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, the most northeasterly region of the Russian Federation. Chukotka is characterized by a low population density, an untouched and mostly mountainous natural landscape, and a harsh Arctic climate. About half of the region’s territory lies north of the Arctic Circle. Transportation by airplane is more efficient and more widespread than travel on the region’s few roads. Sorin and Gotlib initially planned to travel by barge along the Anadyr’ River, but the complications of transportation in Chukotka led them to alter their plans. Their eventual route took them from Anadyr’, the administrative center of the region, to the tundra settlement of Ust’-Belaya, and on to the settlements of Bukhta Provideniya, Sireniki, and Novoye Chaplino on the shores of the Bering Sea. Sorin and Gotlib concluded that conventional concepts of time and punctuality have little meaning in Chukotka, which explains the word “timeless” that they used in naming their collection. The photographs depict the daily lives of the people of Chukotka, as well as its settlements, coastlines, and natural landscapes. The collection was gathered for the Meeting of Frontiers digital library project in the early 2000s.

Head of a Caught Bearded Seal. Children. Shore of the Bering Sea

This photograph is from a collection entitled “Timeless Chukotka,” which was created by Moscow photographer Aleksandr Vladimirovich Sorin (born 1965) and Novosibirsk journalist Artem Gotlib. In June and July of 2003, Sorin and Gotlib undertook an expedition to the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, the most northeasterly region of the Russian Federation. Chukotka is characterized by a low population density, an untouched and mostly mountainous natural landscape, and a harsh Arctic climate. About half of the region’s territory lies north of the Arctic Circle. Transportation by airplane is more efficient and more widespread than travel on the region’s few roads. Sorin and Gotlib initially planned to travel by barge along the Anadyr’ River, but the complications of transportation in Chukotka led them to alter their plans. Their eventual route took them from Anadyr’, the administrative center of the region, to the tundra settlement of Ust’-Belaya, and on to the settlements of Bukhta Provideniya, Sireniki, and Novoye Chaplino on the shores of the Bering Sea. Sorin and Gotlib concluded that conventional concepts of time and punctuality have little meaning in Chukotka, which explains the word “timeless” that they used in naming their collection. The photographs depict the daily lives of the people of Chukotka, as well as its settlements, coastlines, and natural landscapes. The collection was gathered for the Meeting of Frontiers digital library project in the early 2000s.

Cutting Up a Bearded Seal

This photograph is from a collection entitled “Timeless Chukotka,” which was created by Moscow photographer Aleksandr Vladimirovich Sorin (born 1965) and Novosibirsk journalist Artem Gotlib. In June and July of 2003, Sorin and Gotlib undertook an expedition to the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, the most northeasterly region of the Russian Federation. Chukotka is characterized by a low population density, an untouched and mostly mountainous natural landscape, and a harsh Arctic climate. About half of the region’s territory lies north of the Arctic Circle. Transportation by airplane is more efficient and more widespread than travel on the region’s few roads. Sorin and Gotlib initially planned to travel by barge along the Anadyr’ River, but the complications of transportation in Chukotka led them to alter their plans. Their eventual route took them from Anadyr’, the administrative center of the region, to the tundra settlement of Ust’-Belaya, and on to the settlements of Bukhta Provideniya, Sireniki, and Novoye Chaplino on the shores of the Bering Sea. Sorin and Gotlib concluded that conventional concepts of time and punctuality have little meaning in Chukotka, which explains the word “timeless” that they used in naming their collection. The photographs depict the daily lives of the people of Chukotka, as well as its settlements, coastlines, and natural landscapes. The collection was gathered for the Meeting of Frontiers digital library project in the early 2000s.

Recreation on the Way to the Kaplik Cliff

This photograph is from a collection entitled “Timeless Chukotka,” which was created by Moscow photographer Aleksandr Vladimirovich Sorin (born 1965) and Novosibirsk journalist Artem Gotlib. In June and July of 2003, Sorin and Gotlib undertook an expedition to the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, the most northeasterly region of the Russian Federation. Chukotka is characterized by a low population density, an untouched and mostly mountainous natural landscape, and a harsh Arctic climate. About half of the region’s territory lies north of the Arctic Circle. Transportation by airplane is more efficient and more widespread than travel on the region’s few roads. Sorin and Gotlib initially planned to travel by barge along the Anadyr’ River, but the complications of transportation in Chukotka led them to alter their plans. Their eventual route took them from Anadyr’, the administrative center of the region, to the tundra settlement of Ust’-Belaya, and on to the settlements of Bukhta Provideniya, Sireniki, and Novoye Chaplino on the shores of the Bering Sea. Sorin and Gotlib concluded that conventional concepts of time and punctuality have little meaning in Chukotka, which explains the word “timeless” that they used in naming their collection. The photographs depict the daily lives of the people of Chukotka, as well as its settlements, coastlines, and natural landscapes. The collection was gathered for the Meeting of Frontiers digital library project in the early 2000s.