September 15, 2016

Anīs for Children, Volume 6, Issue 38, December 4, 1975

Kamkayāno anīs (Anīs for children) is a magazine for young readers in Afghanistan. Its parent publication, the newspaper Anīs (first published on May 6, 1927), was named after its first director, Muhyi al-Din Anis (died 1938 or 1939), one of the founders of journalism in Afghanistan. Anīs is also the word for “companion” in Arabic and Persian, so the title Kamkayāno anīs can be seen to contain a play on words denoting “the children’s companion.” Kamkayāno anīs began in the late 1960s. It was first published under a different title (though with the same meaning), Kūchnayāno anīs, under the direction of Tahir Paknahad. The magazine changed its name to Kamkayāno anīs in the early 1970s. At this time, it was a weekly publication that included articles, cartoons, stories, jokes, puzzles, and readers’ correspondence. A fair amount of the content was in the form of contributions by its young readers. The major part of the journal is in Persian, while each issue contained several items in Pushto as well. The early editorship of Kamkayāno anīs included such well-known journalistic figures as Shukriya Ra‘d (who also served as editor of the journal Zhvandūn). Articles published in the 1970s included occasional references to American culture and society, as can be seen, for example, in essays on farming practices in the United States and on children’s television programs. The magazine ceased publishing shortly after the invasion of Afghanistan by the Soviet Union in 1979. It was resurrected in 1990 under the editorship of Muhammad Mahdi Bashir.

Anīs for Children, Volume 6, Issue 39, December 11, 1975

Kamkayāno anīs (Anīs for children) is a magazine for young readers in Afghanistan. Its parent publication, the newspaper Anīs (first published on May 6, 1927), was named after its first director, Muhyi al-Din Anis (died 1938 or 1939), one of the founders of journalism in Afghanistan. Anīs is also the word for “companion” in Arabic and Persian, so the title Kamkayāno anīs can be seen to contain a play on words denoting “the children’s companion.” Kamkayāno anīs began in the late 1960s. It was first published under a different title (though with the same meaning), Kūchnayāno anīs, under the direction of Tahir Paknahad. The magazine changed its name to Kamkayāno anīs in the early 1970s. At this time, it was a weekly publication that included articles, cartoons, stories, jokes, puzzles, and readers’ correspondence. A fair amount of the content was in the form of contributions by its young readers. The major part of the journal is in Persian, while each issue contained several items in Pushto as well. The early editorship of Kamkayāno anīs included such well-known journalistic figures as Shukriya Ra‘d (who also served as editor of the journal Zhvandūn). Articles published in the 1970s included occasional references to American culture and society, as can be seen, for example, in essays on farming practices in the United States and on children’s television programs. The magazine ceased publishing shortly after the invasion of Afghanistan by the Soviet Union in 1979. It was resurrected in 1990 under the editorship of Muhammad Mahdi Bashir.

Anīs for Children, Volume 6, Issue 40, December 18, 1975

Kamkayāno anīs (Anīs for children) is a magazine for young readers in Afghanistan. Its parent publication, the newspaper Anīs (first published on May 6, 1927), was named after its first director, Muhyi al-Din Anis (died 1938 or 1939), one of the founders of journalism in Afghanistan. Anīs is also the word for “companion” in Arabic and Persian, so the title Kamkayāno anīs can be seen to contain a play on words denoting “the children’s companion.” Kamkayāno anīs began in the late 1960s. It was first published under a different title (though with the same meaning), Kūchnayāno anīs, under the direction of Tahir Paknahad. The magazine changed its name to Kamkayāno anīs in the early 1970s. At this time, it was a weekly publication that included articles, cartoons, stories, jokes, puzzles, and readers’ correspondence. A fair amount of the content was in the form of contributions by its young readers. The major part of the journal is in Persian, while each issue contained several items in Pushto as well. The early editorship of Kamkayāno anīs included such well-known journalistic figures as Shukriya Ra‘d (who also served as editor of the journal Zhvandūn). Articles published in the 1970s included occasional references to American culture and society, as can be seen, for example, in essays on farming practices in the United States and on children’s television programs. The magazine ceased publishing shortly after the invasion of Afghanistan by the Soviet Union in 1979. It was resurrected in 1990 under the editorship of Muhammad Mahdi Bashir.

Anīs for Children, Volume 6, Issue 41, December 25, 1975

Kamkayāno anīs (Anīs for children) is a magazine for young readers in Afghanistan. Its parent publication, the newspaper Anīs (first published on May 6, 1927), was named after its first director, Muhyi al-Din Anis (died 1938 or 1939), one of the founders of journalism in Afghanistan. Anīs is also the word for “companion” in Arabic and Persian, so the title Kamkayāno anīs can be seen to contain a play on words denoting “the children’s companion.” Kamkayāno anīs began in the late 1960s. It was first published under a different title (though with the same meaning), Kūchnayāno anīs, under the direction of Tahir Paknahad. The magazine changed its name to Kamkayāno anīs in the early 1970s. At this time, it was a weekly publication that included articles, cartoons, stories, jokes, puzzles, and readers’ correspondence. A fair amount of the content was in the form of contributions by its young readers. The major part of the journal is in Persian, while each issue contained several items in Pushto as well. The early editorship of Kamkayāno anīs included such well-known journalistic figures as Shukriya Ra‘d (who also served as editor of the journal Zhvandūn). Articles published in the 1970s included occasional references to American culture and society, as can be seen, for example, in essays on farming practices in the United States and on children’s television programs. The magazine ceased publishing shortly after the invasion of Afghanistan by the Soviet Union in 1979. It was resurrected in 1990 under the editorship of Muhammad Mahdi Bashir.

Anīs for Children, Volume 6, Issue 42, January 1, 1976

Kamkayāno anīs (Anīs for children) is a magazine for young readers in Afghanistan. Its parent publication, the newspaper Anīs (first published on May 6, 1927), was named after its first director, Muhyi al-Din Anis (died 1938 or 1939), one of the founders of journalism in Afghanistan. Anīs is also the word for “companion” in Arabic and Persian, so the title Kamkayāno anīs can be seen to contain a play on words denoting “the children’s companion.” Kamkayāno anīs began in the late 1960s. It was first published under a different title (though with the same meaning), Kūchnayāno anīs, under the direction of Tahir Paknahad. The magazine changed its name to Kamkayāno anīs in the early 1970s. At this time, it was a weekly publication that included articles, cartoons, stories, jokes, puzzles, and readers’ correspondence. A fair amount of the content was in the form of contributions by its young readers. The major part of the journal is in Persian, while each issue contained several items in Pushto as well. The early editorship of Kamkayāno anīs included such well-known journalistic figures as Shukriya Ra‘d (who also served as editor of the journal Zhvandūn). Articles published in the 1970s included occasional references to American culture and society, as can be seen, for example, in essays on farming practices in the United States and on children’s television programs. The magazine ceased publishing shortly after the invasion of Afghanistan by the Soviet Union in 1979. It was resurrected in 1990 under the editorship of Muhammad Mahdi Bashir.

Anīs for Children, Volume 7, Issue 43, January 8, 1976

Kamkayāno anīs (Anīs for children) is a magazine for young readers in Afghanistan. Its parent publication, the newspaper Anīs (first published on May 6, 1927), was named after its first director, Muhyi al-Din Anis (died 1938 or 1939), one of the founders of journalism in Afghanistan. Anīs is also the word for “companion” in Arabic and Persian, so the title Kamkayāno anīs can be seen to contain a play on words denoting “the children’s companion.” Kamkayāno anīs began in the late 1960s. It was first published under a different title (though with the same meaning), Kūchnayāno anīs, under the direction of Tahir Paknahad. The magazine changed its name to Kamkayāno anīs in the early 1970s. At this time, it was a weekly publication that included articles, cartoons, stories, jokes, puzzles, and readers’ correspondence. A fair amount of the content was in the form of contributions by its young readers. The major part of the journal is in Persian, while each issue contained several items in Pushto as well. The early editorship of Kamkayāno anīs included such well-known journalistic figures as Shukriya Ra‘d (who also served as editor of the journal Zhvandūn). Articles published in the 1970s included occasional references to American culture and society, as can be seen, for example, in essays on farming practices in the United States and on children’s television programs. The magazine ceased publishing shortly after the invasion of Afghanistan by the Soviet Union in 1979. It was resurrected in 1990 under the editorship of Muhammad Mahdi Bashir.

Anīs for Children, Volume 7, Issue 44, January 15, 1976

Kamkayāno anīs (Anīs for children) is a magazine for young readers in Afghanistan. Its parent publication, the newspaper Anīs (first published on May 6, 1927), was named after its first director, Muhyi al-Din Anis (died 1938 or 1939), one of the founders of journalism in Afghanistan. Anīs is also the word for “companion” in Arabic and Persian, so the title Kamkayāno anīs can be seen to contain a play on words denoting “the children’s companion.” Kamkayāno anīs began in the late 1960s. It was first published under a different title (though with the same meaning), Kūchnayāno anīs, under the direction of Tahir Paknahad. The magazine changed its name to Kamkayāno anīs in the early 1970s. At this time, it was a weekly publication that included articles, cartoons, stories, jokes, puzzles, and readers’ correspondence. A fair amount of the content was in the form of contributions by its young readers. The major part of the journal is in Persian, while each issue contained several items in Pushto as well. The early editorship of Kamkayāno anīs included such well-known journalistic figures as Shukriya Ra‘d (who also served as editor of the journal Zhvandūn). Articles published in the 1970s included occasional references to American culture and society, as can be seen, for example, in essays on farming practices in the United States and on children’s television programs. The magazine ceased publishing shortly after the invasion of Afghanistan by the Soviet Union in 1979. It was resurrected in 1990 under the editorship of Muhammad Mahdi Bashir.

Anīs for Children, Volume 7, Issue 45, January 22, 1976

Kamkayāno anīs (Anīs for children) is a magazine for young readers in Afghanistan. Its parent publication, the newspaper Anīs (first published on May 6, 1927), was named after its first director, Muhyi al-Din Anis (died 1938 or 1939), one of the founders of journalism in Afghanistan. Anīs is also the word for “companion” in Arabic and Persian, so the title Kamkayāno anīs can be seen to contain a play on words denoting “the children’s companion.” Kamkayāno anīs began in the late 1960s. It was first published under a different title (though with the same meaning), Kūchnayāno anīs, under the direction of Tahir Paknahad. The magazine changed its name to Kamkayāno anīs in the early 1970s. At this time, it was a weekly publication that included articles, cartoons, stories, jokes, puzzles, and readers’ correspondence. A fair amount of the content was in the form of contributions by its young readers. The major part of the journal is in Persian, while each issue contained several items in Pushto as well. The early editorship of Kamkayāno anīs included such well-known journalistic figures as Shukriya Ra‘d (who also served as editor of the journal Zhvandūn). Articles published in the 1970s included occasional references to American culture and society, as can be seen, for example, in essays on farming practices in the United States and on children’s television programs. The magazine ceased publishing shortly after the invasion of Afghanistan by the Soviet Union in 1979. It was resurrected in 1990 under the editorship of Muhammad Mahdi Bashir.

Kandahār, Volume 15, Number 5, August 1974

Kandahār was founded in 1960 as the monthly magazine of the Pushto vernacular in Kandahar Province. It was established within the structure of the Kandahar-based Tolo-e Afghan newspaper, with Mohammad Wali Zulmay as the first editor in chief. In an editorial note dated April 21, 1961, and entitled “With the Writers of Kandahār, the second editor in chief, Agha Mohammad Karzai, states that the objective of the magazine is “to represent the culture of Kandahar for the purposes of writing and enlightening people on the subjects of history, literature, economy, and language.” Issues published between 1961 and 1974 contain articles on such topics as “Contemporary Pushto Language and Pushto Identity,” “The Literature of China,” “Pushtonistan,” “Kandahar’s Forty Towers Castle,” “The Emergence of the Novel in Russian Literature,” “Abraham Lincoln,” “The Unending War in Vietnam,” and many others. What makes Kandahār interesting and important is its vernacular character. The magazine has been one of the major publications in Pushto produced and read in southern Afghanistan. It is a rich source of information about literary, historical, and political thinking in Afghanistan from the 1960s onwards, particularly in rural and provincial localities, and is especially valuable to scholars interested in Afghan history and culture. Kandahār averaged 30‒50 pages every month. It almost always had colorful front and back covers with illustrations to accompany the text of the articles. Contributors to the magazine were often local and nationalist literary intellectuals from Kandahar as well as from throughout Afghanistan. Kandahār has continued publication up to the present day, but its contents have changed over time in ways that reflect the social and political dynamics in the country.

Kandahār, Volume 15, Number 6, September 1974

Kandahār was founded in 1960 as the monthly magazine of the Pushto vernacular in Kandahar Province. It was established within the structure of the Kandahar-based Tolo-e Afghan newspaper, with Mohammad Wali Zulmay as the first editor in chief. In an editorial note dated April 21, 1961, and entitled “With the Writers of Kandahār, the second editor in chief, Agha Mohammad Karzai, states that the objective of the magazine is “to represent the culture of Kandahar for the purposes of writing and enlightening people on the subjects of history, literature, economy, and language.” Issues published between 1961 and 1974 contain articles on such topics as “Contemporary Pushto Language and Pushto Identity,” “The Literature of China,” “Pushtonistan,” “Kandahar’s Forty Towers Castle,” “The Emergence of the Novel in Russian Literature,” “Abraham Lincoln,” “The Unending War in Vietnam,” and many others. What makes Kandahār interesting and important is its vernacular character. The magazine has been one of the major publications in Pushto produced and read in southern Afghanistan. It is a rich source of information about literary, historical, and political thinking in Afghanistan from the 1960s onwards, particularly in rural and provincial localities, and is especially valuable to scholars interested in Afghan history and culture. Kandahār averaged 30‒50 pages every month. It almost always had colorful front and back covers with illustrations to accompany the text of the articles. Contributors to the magazine were often local and nationalist literary intellectuals from Kandahar as well as from throughout Afghanistan. Kandahār has continued publication up to the present day, but its contents have changed over time in ways that reflect the social and political dynamics in the country.