Treaty between the Republic of Colombia and the United States of America for the Settlement of Their Differences Arising from the Events That Took Place in the Isthmus of Panama in November 1903, Signed in Bogota on April 6, 1914

Description

Tratado entre la Républica de Colombia y los Estados Unidos de América para el areglo de sus diferencias provenientes de los ancontecimientos realizados en el Istmo de Panamá en noviembre de 1903, soscrito en Bogotá el 6 de Abril de 1914 (Treaty between the Republic of Colombia and the United States of America for the settlement of their differences arising from the events that took place in the Isthmus of Panama in November 1903, signed in Bogota on April 6, 1914) is an official publication of the government of Colombia concerning the understandings reached between Colombia and the United States regarding the establishment in 1903 of the independent state of Panama. On January 22, 1903, Colombia and the United States signed a treaty that gave the United States the right to build a canal across the Isthmus of Panama, at that time part of Colombia. Public opinion in Colombia regarded the financial terms of the treaty as unsatisfactory and objected to the way in which the agreement impinged upon Colombian sovereignty. On August 12, 1903, the Colombian Senate voted unanimously against ratification. The United States eventually was able to build the canal by encouraging the breakaway from Colombia of the province of Panama to create a newly independent Republic of Panama. It then concluded, on November 18 of the same year, a treaty with Panama on essentially the same terms as the earlier treaty with Colombia. Colombia subsequently sought redress for the wrongs it had been done, but it was rebuffed by the Republican administrations of Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft. When Woodrow Wilson, a Democrat, became president in 1913, he sought a new start with the Colombians. In the agreement presented here, concluded by the Wilson administration with the government of Colombia, the United States expressed “sincere regret” for the events of 1903 and agreed to pay Colombia $25 million in compensation. Roosevelt was still a formidable force in American politics, however, and he successfully rallied opposition to the treaty in the Senate on the grounds that no admission of American guilt should be made. Not until 1921 and the Harding administration was a settlement with Colombia reached. The United States agreed to pay the $25 million, but the reference to “sincere regret” was dropped.

Date Created

Subject Date

Publication Information

National Press, Bogota

Language

Title in Original Language

Tratado entre la República de Colombia y los Estados Unidos de América para el areglo de sus diferencias provenientes de los ancontecimientos realizados en el Istmo de Panamá en noviembre de 1903, soscrito en Bogotá el 6 de Abril de 1914

Type of Item

Physical Description

168 pages ; 29 centimeters

Notes

  • Bound with: Tratados, convenciones y acuerdos aprobados por el Congreso nacional de 1913

References

  1. Thomas A. Bailey, A Diplomatic History of the American People, third edition (New York: Appleton-Century Crofts, 1946).

Last updated: July 12, 2017