Relation of what Occurred that was Most Remarkable in the Missions of the Fathers of the Society of Jesus in New France in the Years 1671 and 1672

Description

The Jesuit priest Claude Dablon (circa 1619‒97) came to Canada in the late summer of 1655, where he remained until his death. In addition to his work as a missionary, Dablon developed a keen interest in the geography of the interior of North America, still largely unknown to Europeans at that time. In 1669 he and Father Claude Allouez (1622‒89) undertook a journey around Lake Superior, which contributed to the earliest European mapping of the lake. Dablon was appointed superior of the Jesuit missions in New France 1671 and in that capacity wrote Relation de ce qui s'est passé de plus remarquable aux Missions des Pères de la Compagnie de Jésus, en la Nouvelle France, les années 1671 & 1672 (Relation of what occurred that was most remarkable in the missions of the fathers of the Society of Jesus in New France in the years 1671 and 1672). This was the last of the Relations to be published in the 17th century. Its contents include an account of a missionary journey to the Huron Country in 1671‒72, summaries of the activities of the seven Jesuit missions to the Iroquois, and an account of the discovery of a land route to Hudson Bay, made by order of Jean Talon, Intendant of New France, by one of Talon’s officers, Paul Denis de Saint Simon, and the Jesuit Charles Albanel. Presented here is the original edition, published in Paris in 1673. Like all of the Relations from 1633 onward, it was published by the press founded by Sébastien Cramoisy (1585‒1669), printer to the king, and carried on by his son Sébastien Mabre-Cramoisy.

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Publication Information

Sébastien Mabre-Cramoisy, Paris

Language

Title in Original Language

Relation de ce qui s'est passé de plus remarquable aux Missions des Pères de la Compagnie de Jésus, en la Nouvelle-France, les années 1671 & 1672

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264 pages

Last updated: November 20, 2015