Portable Atlas of the Hungarian Kingdom: New and Complete Representation of the Kingdom of Hungary in 60 Plates in Pocket Format

Description

Atlas Regni Hungariae Portatilis: Neue und vollständige Darstellung des Königreichs Ungarn (Portable atlas of the Hungarian kingdom: new and complete representation of the Kingdom of Hungary) is the first pocket-sized atlas of the Kingdom of Hungary. Its creator was a Slovak, Ján Matej Korabinský, who was born in Prešov in 1740 and died in Bratislava in 1811. Korabinský was a professor at several academic institutions, who taught theology, philosophy, and mathematics. The atlas contains copperplate maps of 58 counties, including those that constitute part of present-day Slovakia. All maps also contain the coats of arms of the counties. The scale is given in miles. On each map are shown free royal cities, bishoprics, villages, marketplaces, castles, ruins, estates, post offices, churches (Catholic, Protestant, Reformed, and Greek Orthodox), and nationalities, which are indicated with different markings. This was one of the first times that such specific markings for different nationalities, including Germans, Hungarians, Slovaks, Ruthenians, and Vlachs, were used in a geographical work published in the Austrian Empire. The atlas is in German, but where relevant, place-names are given in Hungarian, Slovak, or other languages as well as German. The last page of the atlas contains a register of the place-names in the atlas and a key to the geographic symbols used on the maps.

Date Created

Subject Date

Publication Information

Vienna

Title in Original Language

Atlas Regni Hungariae Portatilis: Neue und vollständige Darstellung des Königreichs Ungarn auf 60 Taflen im Taschenformat. Ein geographisches Noth- und Hülfsbüchlein

Type of Item

Physical Description

56 folios ; 14.5 x 21.5 centimeters

Last updated: August 18, 2014