17 results in English
Costa Rica - from Official and Other Sources
This 1903 map of Costa Rica was published by the International Bureau of the American Republics (instituted in 1910 as the Pan American Union), an agency established in 1890 in Washington D.C., by resolution of the International Conference of American States. The bureau issued handbooks, maps, and a monthly bulletin for disseminating information relating to the promotion of trade among the countries of the Americas.  The map shows physical features, such as rivers, lakes and mountains, international and provincial borders, and the routes of steamship lines from the port ...
El Salvador - from Official and Other Sources
This 1903 map of El Salvador was published by the International Bureau of the American Republics (instituted in 1910 as the Pan American Union), an agency established in 1890 in Washington D.C., by resolution of the International Conference of American States. The bureau issued handbooks, maps, and a monthly bulletin for disseminating information relating to the promotion of trade among the countries of the Americas. The map shows the capital city of San Salvador; the capitals of departments and other important cities; international and departmental borders; submarine cables, telegraph ...
Telegram from Orville Wright in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, to His Father Announcing Four Successful Flights, 1903 December 17
At approximately 10:35 in the morning on December 17, 1903, Orville Wright made the first powered, controlled, and sustained flight of a heavier-than-air machine. The flight lasted 12 seconds and covered 120 feet (37 meters). Orville and his brother Wilbur made three more flights that day, the longest of which covered 852 feet (260 meters) in 59 seconds. With this telegram, sent from Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, in the late afternoon of the same day, Orville informed their father of the achievement. The text reads: “Success four flights this ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Topsy-Turvy Land: Arabia Pictured for Children
Samuel Zwemer (1867–1952) was an American missionary who became known as the “Apostle to Islam” for his strenuous if not always successful evangelization efforts in Islamic countries. He attended Hope College in Holland, Michigan, and the New Brunswick Seminary in New Jersey. In 1889 he and a classmate founded the American Arabian Mission, which later received sponsorship from the Reformed Church. The next year he departed for the Arabian Peninsula. In 1896 he met and married Amy Wilkes (died 1937), an Australian fellow missionary and nurse. The Zwemers spent ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Germany and Its Colonies: Travels through the Empire and Its Overseas Possessions, with the Collaboration of Arthur Achleitner, Johannes Biernatzki, et al.
This 538-page work with its 1,367 illustrations reflects German national pride in the early 20th century, a period of rapid economic growth and scientific and cultural achievement in the German Empire. Most of the book deals with Germany proper, which at that time included Alsace-Lorraine, conquered from France in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71. A concluding chapter is devoted to Germany’s overseas empire, which had grown rapidly since the achievement of national unity in 1871. Germany’s colonies included Togo, Cameroon, German South-West Africa (present-day Namibia), German East ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Making the Beautiful Inlaid Pearlwork of the Orient, Damascus, Syria
This early-20th century photograph, taken in Damascus by William H. Rau, depicts men, women, and children in a crowded workshop making what Rau described as “inlaid pearlwork” furniture. The workshops of Damascus were famed for this intricate craft, which features geometrical designs of alternating pieces of mother of pearl and polished wood. Rau was an American photographer best known for his images of railroads and American landscapes. He first traveled to the Near East in 1882 for a six-month journey with publisher Edward L. Wilson.
Contributed by Library of Congress
King Bihuazin [i.e. Béhanzin] of Dahomey, and His Two Wives [Standing on Porch]: French Government Prisoner in Martinique, Fort de France
This photograph was taken in Fort de France on the French island of Martinique around 1902. It shows the former King Béhanzin (1844-1906) of Dahomey (present-day Benin), who was banished to the Caribbean territory in 1894. The Kingdom of Dahomey, with its capital at Abomey, was founded in the 17th century. French colonial expansion into west Africa in the late 19th century and French efforts to suppress the slave trade led to conflict between France and the kingdom. In 1892, the kingdom was defeated in a war with France and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
India
This early-20th century map shows the British Empire in India, a complex political structure that was made up of provinces directly ruled by Britain and the Native--or Princely--States, which were ruled indirectly through Indian sovereigns subject to British suzerainty. Also shown on the map are the French and Portuguese enclaves, the independent states of Nepal and Bhutan, and the island of Ceylon (present-day Sri Lanka), which was under British rule but not part of the Indian Empire. India became independent in 1947, but was partitioned into the states of India ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
East African Official for Germany, Formerly a Sultan, Tanganyika, Africa
This photograph of an official in Tanganyika (present-day Tanzania) is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Emigrants [i.e. Immigrants] Landing at Ellis Island
Ellis Island was the gateway to American life for millions of immigrants from 1892 to 1954. This film, shot by prolific filmmaker, writer, producer, and director Alfred C. Abadie, was a production of Thomas A. Edison’s Edison Manufacturing Company. It was listed in a contemporary company catalog under the title “Emigrants Landing at Ellis Island” with the description: “Shows a large open barge loaded with people of every nationality, who have just arrived from Europe, disembarking at Ellis Island, N.Y.” The film opens with a view of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Somaliland Expedition. Colonel Plunkett's Disaster. Trapped. The Fight to the Death - near Gumbura
This pencil drawing and watercolor was created by Melton Prior (1845–1910) in British Somaliland (the northern part of present-day Somalia) in 1903. Prior had been sent by the Illustrated London News to cover a small conflict that had erupted between the British authorities and Mohammed bin Abdulla Hassan (circa 1856–1920), the “Mad Mullah” of Somaliland. On April 17, a small British force of some 230 British and Sikh troops, at left in the image, was surrounded by about 14,000 Somalis charging from all directions and completely destroyed ...
Contributed by Brown University Library
Homestead, Pennsylvania, 1902
This panoramic map shows Homestead, Pennsylvania, as it appeared in 1902. Homestead was the site of a major steel mill owned by Andrew Carnegie and of a bloody strike in 1892 resulting from a dispute between the Carnegie Steel Company and the steelworkers union. The index at the bottom indicates points of interest, including the steel works and other major industrial facilities, railroad stations, schools, churches, and the city’s Carnegie Library. The number and variety of houses of worship—a synagogue and churches for Presbyterian, Baptist, Lutheran, Polish Catholic ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1902
This panoramic map shows Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as it appeared in 1902. The numbered index at the bottom indicates points of interest, including major railroad stations, the post office, Fort Pitt blockhouse, the courthouse, and the Frick, Carnegie, and Park buildings. With its elevated view, the map shows the growth of the city along the banks of Monongahela and Allegheny Rivers, which meet at Pittsburgh to form the Ohio River. The panoramic map was a cartographic form popularly used to depict U.S. and Canadian cities and towns in the late ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
First Flight, December 17, 1903
This photograph shows the first powered, controlled, and sustained flight of a heavier-than-air machine, which took place in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, at approximately 10:35 in the morning on December 17, 1903. The flight lasted 12 seconds and covered 120 feet (37 meters). The photo shows Orville Wright at the controls, lying prone on the lower wing with hips in the cradle which operated the wing-warping mechanism. Wilbur Wright is running alongside to balance the machine and has just released his hold on the forward upright of the right ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Main Mosque (1902-03), North Facade, Perm', Russia
This view of the main mosque (Sobornaia mechet') in Perm' was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Situated on the middle reaches of the Kama River, Perm’ is a city of many ethnic groups and faiths. The Tatar community is among the oldest, and at the beginning of the 20th century, it participated in a religious and cultural renaissance among Tatars in the Russian Empire. As a result of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Who is the Murderer?
Panchkori Dey (also seen as Babu Panch Kori Dey, 1873–1945) was a Bengali writer of detective fiction, best known for two of his characters: Arindam Bosu, a dhoti-wearing detective working in India and Europe, and Jumelia, a cunning and wicked criminal. Dey was influenced by 19th-century European writers of criminal romances, such as Wilkie Collins and Emile Gaboriau. Hatyakari Ke? (Who is the murderer?) was first published in Bengali in about 1903; the edition presented here is a later Urdu translation. The plot revolves around a father who ...
Uganda’s Katikiro in England
Uganda’s Katikiro in England is the official account of the visit of the katikiro (prime minister) of Buganda, Apolo Kagwa (circa 1864–1927), in 1902 to participate in the coronation of King Edward VII, who ascended to the British throne following the death of his mother, Queen Victoria, in early 1901. The grandson of a Ugandan chief, Apolo served as a page in the court of King Mutesa I of Buganda (reigned, 1856–84) and became a Christian at a young age. He rose to become chief storekeeper and ...