16 results in English
Arabia
John Tallis and Company was a British mapmaking and publishing firm, founded by John Tallis (1817–76), which was active in London circa 1835−60. Tallis maps were known for their accurate information with numerous place-names and geographical details, as well as for the use of shaded areas to indicate topographical features. They are identifiable by the scrolling on the borders and the finely-drawn scenes inscribed on the margins of the maps, which John Tallis and his illustrators derived from travelogues and other written sources. John Rapkin (1815−76) was ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
Map of the Gold Regions of California
The California Gold Rush of 1849 was a major event that sparked interest around the world and spurred the long-term rise and development of San Francisco and the surrounding region. Previously a Spanish and Mexican outpost, California witnessed a huge influx of prospectors and settlers after the gold strikes at Sutter’s Mill in early 1848. This map shows the entire area of California, including the Baja (present-day Mexico), and highlights in bright yellow the gold-producing regions along several rivers. The map also lists the names of various mountains, bays ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Dahomey and the Dahomans: Being the Journals of Two Missions to the King of Dahomey, and Residence at His Capital, in the Year 1849 and 1850
Frederick E. Forbes was a British naval officer who, in 1849-50, undertook two missions to the court of the King of Dahomey in an unsuccessful attempt to convince him to end involvement in the slave trade. Dahomey was a warlike kingdom that arose most likely in the second quarter of the 17th century and came to dominate its neighbors through its army, which included both men and women and was based on strict military discipline. This two-volume work reproduces Forbes’ journal and his account of his conversations with King Gezo ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Forest. Anita Dying
This painting depicting Italian patriots during the wars of Italian independence is excerpted from a multi-scene, “moving” panorama that is more than 1.2 meters tall and 110 meters long. Giant paintings such as these were a popular form of entertainment in the 19th century. The panorama scroll would be unrolled slowly as a narrator described the action. In its entirety, this panorama chronicles the life and exploits of Giuseppe Garibaldi, the Italian freedom fighter. The work is attributed to John James Story (1827-1900), an artist from Nottingham, England, but ...
Contributed by Brown University Library
Portrait of Mauma Mollie
Mauma, a Partridge family slave, was transported to South Carolina on a slave ship from Africa. She came to Jefferson County, Florida with John and Eliza Partridge in the 1830s, and was Frances Weston Partridge’s nurse. Henry Edward Partridge recorded in his diary in 1873: “We buried either in 57 or 58 our faithful old ‘Mauma’ Mollie – her who had nursed nearly all of the children of the family; been a friend as well as faithful servant to my Mother; in whose cabin we had often eaten the homely ...
New Testament of Our Lord Jesus Christ
The noted educational reformer, grammarian, and priest Neofit Rilski (1793–1881) was the first to translate the New Testament into modern Bulgarian. Rilski’s translation was critical to religious education, as most Bulgarians could not understand the existing translations of the Bible into Church Slavic. Financed by the Protestant British and Foreign Bible Society and sanctioned by the head of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church, Ilarion, Metropolitan of Tŭrnovo, the translation was a milestone in the Bulgarian National Revival and in the efforts of Bulgarians to achieve religious autonomy from the ...
Map of Central America Including the States of Guatemala, Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica, the Territories of Belise and Mosquito, with Parts of Mexico, Yucatan and New Granada
John Baily was an Englishman who lived for many years in Central America. He was employed in 1837-38 by the government of Nicaragua to survey a potential canal route from the Caribbean Sea to the Pacific Ocean. This map, published in London in 1850, was accompanied by a book, Central America, published separately, which contained much of the detailed information that Baily gathered to make this map. The map shows four possible canal routes: one surveyed for the government of Costa Rica in 1848 by the Danish engineer Andres Oersted ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Central America; Describing Each of the States of Guatemala, Honduras, Salvador, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica
John Baily was an Englishman who lived for many years in Central America. He was employed in 1837–38 by the government of Nicaragua to survey a potential canal route from the Caribbean Sea to the Pacific Ocean. In 1850 Baily published this book and a separate map of Central America that showed four proposed routes for an isthmian canal. Central America begins with an introductory chapter on the geography, history, and economy of the region as a whole, followed by individual chapters devoted to Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Mosquito ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Charles Oakford's Hat and Cap Store, Wholesale and Retail, Number 104, Chestnut Street, Philadelphia
This print is an advertisement for the retail and wholesale hat store operated by Charles Oakford in Philadelphia. Oakford established his business in 1827, relocated to 104 Chestnut Street in 1843, where he began his wholesale trade in 1850, and operated from this address until 1852. The advertisement contains an exterior view of the store, surrounded by a decorative border comprised of hats and vignettes. The proprietor is seen standing behind the double-sided glass door of his establishment and displays of hats adorn the showcase windows of the store. The ...
Philadelphia, from the State House Steeple, North, East and South
This lithograph is by Leo von Elliot (1816−90) after a sketch by Joseph Thoma. Little is known about either of these artists. The panoramic view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century looks east toward the Delaware River, predominantly showing the area east of Fifth Street between Arch and South Streets from the State House (Independence Hall). It includes the Court House (later City Hall, 500 Chestnut Street) and the Philadelphia Library (the Library Company of Philadelphia, 105 South Fifth Street). Also seen are a flag flying on top of ...
Melloy & Ford, Wholesale Tin Ware Manufacturers
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the factory operated by John M. Melloy and Robert Ford at 291 Market Street (later renumbered 723). It promotes the "lowest rates," "quick sales & small profits," and "metallic roofing." The building’s many signs and product advertisements include a large scale model of a coffeepot and prominent displays of tinware in the shop window, on the shelves, and by the door. In front of ...
Potter & Carmichael, Oil Cloth Manufacturers. Warehouse, Number 135, North Third Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the busy factory complex on Second Street above the Reading Railroad (i.e., 135 North Third Street above Race Street). A "Franklin-ville, Oilcloth Works" sign tops the roof of the main factory building around which workers stretch cloth on long flat racks. Cloth is also stretched down the sides of buildings. Other men move a roll of carpet into a hatch, load materials into ...
T.I. Dyre, Jr., Bell & Brass Founder, Corner of Washington & Church Streets, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the Dyre foundry complex in South Philadelphia, including the "Black Lead Crucible Manufactory," "Brass & Bell Foundry," an office-like building, and a workshop with a stack spewing smoke. A gentleman enters the office as a laborer pushes a wheelbarrow on the sidewalk toward an alley, out of which a drayman leads his horse-drawn vehicle transporting a large bell. In the street, a crowded "Gray's ...
Porteus' Works. Pine Oil Camphine Distilled by Steam. Number 581, North Front Street. Philadelphia
This advertisement for the J.A. Porteus Chemical Works in Philadelphia depicts aspects of industry in mid-19th century America. The illustration at the top shows a view of the works, located at 581 North Front Street. Laborers load a horse-drawn wagon and a dray with barrels that are lined along the building. A couple walks past the factory, which is comprised of gable-roofed brick buildings of various heights. The illustration below is a cross-section view of an enormous distilling machine used in making the firm’s products, which included turpentine ...
S.F. Jacoby and Company. Importers and Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Marble in All Their Varieties. J.K. and M. Freedley Dealers in American Marble
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement contains a montage of three titled views showing the sites involved in the operations of the Jacoby and Freedley companies. The scenes are separated and surrounded by an ornate border, comprised of patriotic imagery on top, including an eagle clutching the American flag and shield near a bust of George Washington and the state seals of Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. Filigree, foliage, and tassels decorate the ...
Warnick & Leibrandt's Philadelphia Stove Works and Hollow-Ware Foundry. First Wharf above Noble Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows two views of the stove works and hollow-ware foundries owned and operated by Charles W. Warnick and Frederick Leibrandt. The upper scene depicts the stove works at Gunners Run (later the Aramingo Canal) and Franklin Avenue (later Girard Avenue). Viewed from the opposite bank of Gunner's Run, the scene shows laborers with horse-drawn carts and drays on the bank of the canal, in ...